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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: October ::
Re: ACTER MM; Vision in Macbeth
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1058.  Tuesday, 21 October 1997.

[1]     From:   David Skeele <
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        Date:   Monday, 20 Oct 1997 11:50:19 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1053  ACTER F97 *Measure* Tour

[2]     From:   Stuart Manger <
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        Date:   Monday, 20 Oct 1997 18:46:57 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1051  Q: Vision in Macbeth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Skeele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 20 Oct 1997 11:50:19 -0400
Subject: 8.1053  ACTER F97 *Measure* Tour
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1053  ACTER F97 *Measure* Tour

After having had the excellent fortune of being able to bring ACTER to
our campus last semester, I am keenly interested in hearing any reviews
of the current production, MEASURE FOR MEASURE.  Have any SHAKSPEReans
seen it?

David Skeele
Slippery Rock University

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stuart Manger <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 20 Oct 1997 18:46:57 +0100
Subject: 8.1051  Q: Vision in Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1051  Q: Vision in Macbeth

A sequence of body politic as well as body human dysfunctions: the
disintegration of the usually integrated functions of eye, hand,
disjoined from a moral function / discriminating / judgemental mind
functions - this seems to feature even more heavily in the imagery.
Schizoid in some senses, tragic heroes do not want to 'see' the
consequences of actions they know to be immoral, YET they also crave
certainty about the future, even wishing to control the passage of time
itself. cf. Faustus? Lear? Hamlet in that wonderfully quiet interlude
with Horatio before the very final scene of the play?

Interesting addendum: Prospero has complete control over all these means
and renounces them - astonishing? Or what! Or is Shak reaching out for a
new moral dimension? perhaps an attempt to resolve the unresolvable in
the tragic / romance worlds? Just a thought.
 

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