Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: October ::
Qs: Macbeth / Children; Shakespeare Editions
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1072.  Sunday, 26 October 1997.

[1]     From:   Stuart Manger <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 24 Oct 1997 21:30:04 +0100
        Subj:   Macbeth / Children as icons

[2]     From:   Ron Ward <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 27 Oct 1997 10:28:24 +1300 (NZDT)
        Subj:   Re: Shakespeare Editions


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stuart Manger <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 24 Oct 1997 21:30:04 +0100
Subject:        Macbeth / Children as icons

I am about to teach a unit on Macbeth and in both reading, and seeing
the Polanski film (again!!), I am struck by the almost eerie, haunting
presence of children, child apparitions, child images, child substitutes
- and almost all of them are BOYS. Indeed, are there any girls
mentioned, except in disparaging terms as the likely mother for wimps
and cowards. The children are victims, witnesses, and sons. BUT many of
them are on the most amazingly steep learning curve. e.g. lady Macduff's
son: starts scene as innocent, vulnerable, playful, perky even cheeky,
but by the end he has learnt about honour, recognised the need to be
'the man' of the house and defend his mother, and in one final awful
moment, realises his own mortality and the reality of death.  In one
scene, he is on stage for about three minutes at most, but I can think
of few scenes of such swift and brutal education and poignancy.  Other
children are bloodied, have their brains bashed out, warn Macbeth, are
untimely ripped, chased and attacked, frightened into escape. I do not
think it is my imagination that Shak seems obsessed in a quiet way with
the fragility of life, and the fragility of boys - of whom in those days
so much was expected - seems to be uppermost in his mind? To bring forth
men children is M's ultimate accolade to his wife, and yet more boys are
chopped down in this play than in almost any other play I can think of.

Stuart Manger

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Ward <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 27 Oct 1997 10:28:24 +1300 (NZDT)
Subject:        Re: Shakespeare Editions

A bit of a tall order this. are there any comprehensive lists of
Shakespeare editions? I am particularly interested in dating a 19th
century edition in my possession. Although well presented with embossed
leather bindings it is undated. Here is the description: The title page
states The Complete Works of William Shakespeare; including the whole of
his Plays, Sonnets and other Poems: With explanatory and critical notes
and a carefully compiled Biography of Shakespeare, Illustrated with
Beautiful Chromo Engravings designed expressly for this edition;
published by John G. Murdoch 41 Castle Street, Holborn, London , printed
by McGready, Thomson & Niven.  (Glasgow, Melbourne, Dunedin). The
engravings appear to have been done by Kronheim & Co.London, and are
also labelled Ent.at Sta. Hall.  It is bound in full leather Gold
embossed with cover scenes from MV, Macbeth, Two Gentlemen of Verona and
Winters Tale.  Any help appreciated.

Ron Ward
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.