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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: October ::
Mac.; Merchant; Urania; Running; Accents
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1093.  Wednesday, 29 October 1997.

[1]     From:   Matthew J. Clark <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Oct 1997 11:46:07 -0400 (AST)
        Subj:   Re: Macbeth / Children

[2]     From:   Louis C Swilley <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Oct 1997 17:10:25 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1084  Re: Gay Merchant

[3]     From:   Robert E. Bjork <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Oct 1997 12:02:17 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1081  Re: Mary Wroth's Urania

[4]     From:   Abigail Quart <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Oct 1997 00:39:04 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1086  Enter Running

[5]     From:   Rosalind King <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Oct 1997 11:43:25 GMT0BST
        Subj:   Re: Accents


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew J. Clark <
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Date:           Tuesday, 28 Oct 1997 11:46:07 -0400 (AST)
Subject:        Re: Macbeth / Children

I agree with the thread of comments about the child-centred theme in
Macbeth. As seen in others of Shakespeare's plays, this theme of
heredity and inheritance, and innocent children seems to be continued. I
saw a version of Macbeth, perhaps one done by the BBC, and remember the
scene with Lady Macduff and the Macduff children. They did seem to have
grown up quite a bit in such a short time, and the focus was put on
their innocence and goodness and lack of any of the conceit or bile so
characteristic among the adults in the play. It is hard to believe that
all of these pitiful people were once such innocent people. Is
Shakespeare using these innocent children as a reminder that evn the
most evil and ambitious man was once a trusting, loving child? OR is he
simply using them to show the intense evil of some characters in the
play?

They are certainly an interesting theme, and much more could be said. I
hope it will.

Matthew J. Clark
University of King's College, Halifax

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis C Swilley <
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Date:           Tuesday, 28 Oct 1997 17:10:25 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 8.1084  Re: Gay Merchant
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1084  Re: Gay Merchant

Concerning Troy Swartz's observation:

> Antonio's melancholy and
> eventual disgust for Portia is easily understandable-Antonio's upset
> because he's going to lose a lover (as many people do).

Antonio's disgust must be relatively short-lived.  At the end of the
play, Antonio, having earlier pledged his life to Shylock for Bassanio's
loan, he now pledges his soul to Portia to guarantee Bassanio's fidelity
to her.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert E. Bjork <
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Date:           Tuesday, 28 Oct 1997 12:02:17 -0700 (MST)
Subject: 8.1081  Re: Mary Wroth's Urania
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1081  Re: Mary Wroth's Urania

Dear Colleagues:  "Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies," which does
publish
Wroth's _Urania_ moved a year ago to the Arizona Center for Medieval and
Renaissance Studies under my direction.  The most recent catalogue is on
line at the website listed below (add "/MRTS"), and you may order books
from Cornell University Press Services, Box 6525, Ithaca, NY 14851; fax
800 688-2877. Orders outside North America are handled by Plymbidge
Distributors, Plymouth, UK.

Vol. 2 of the Urania, by the way, is in preparation.

With best wishes,
Robert E. Bjork
Director, ACMRS (Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies)
ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY
TEMPE AZ  85287-2301
602/965-5900
FAX 602/965-1681
ACMRS Home Page: http://www.asu.edu/clas/acmrs

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Oct 1997 00:39:04 -0500
Subject: 8.1086  Enter Running
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1086  Enter Running

Yeoww! Syd Kasten's information on breath sent me running to my favorite
hotbed of innuendo and subtext, Measure II ii.

From Lucio's "He's coming, I perceive't" to Angelo's "What's this?
What's this?" the meter gets undependable, erratic. Angelo's lines
become strangled and abrupt.

His aside, "She speaks,  and tis / Such sense that my sense breeds with
it" scans perfectly. But when he speaks the end of the line aloud to
Isabella, "Fare you well" something is wrong. It isn't iambic and it
makes the line too long.

Also, Angelo has now turned away from Isabella. We know because
Shakespeare makes her request Angelo to turn back: "Gentle, my lord,
turn back." and "Hark how I'll bribe you; good my lord, turn back."
(Isabella doesn't seem to be having trouble with iambic pentameter.)

Now, it's pretty obvious what sense is breeding. After Angelo hurries
Isabella out of the room, he looks down and asks:

"What's this? What's this? Is this her fault or mine?
The tempter or the tempted, who sins most?
Ha, not she. Nor doth she tempt; but it is I
That, lying by the violet in the sun,
Do as the carrion does, not as the flow'r,
Corrupt with virtuous season..."

The violet was the flower of lust from its association with
Venus/Aphrodite. What carrion does in the sun is swell.

But, not in contradiction but maybe further proof, I was checking lines
for meter when I realized that in Angelo's "when prayers cross" prayers
is the two syllable pray-ers unless you pronounce "hours" as a
two-syllable word.

Ang: (Aside) Amen:
        For I am that way going to temptation,
        Where prayers cross.

Isa:                            At what hour tomorrow
        Shall I attend your lordship?

A few lines earlier, in Isabella's "but with true prayers" prayers is
one syllable.

My slang dictionary says "cross" meant "copulate" in the 1700s for sure,
and maybe earlier.

"Where pray-ers cross" may have a whole other meaning than "cross
purposes" which is its usual gloss.

Can anybody give me more information on this? Usage and pronunciation of
"prayer" and/or any early citing of "cross" as "copulate?"

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rosalind King <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Oct 1997 11:43:25 GMT0BST
Subject:        Re: Accents;

To my mind the only thing that matters is that the accent should be
authentic to the actor - there's nothing worse than one that travels
round the world in the course of a single speech to end in some
mid-Atlantic puddle.  More important than any particular accent - and
there's no reason why the production as a whole shouldn't contain a
variety of accents provided they're each consistent with themselves - is
pace, shape and clarity. It needs to be *interesting* to *listen* to.

Best wishes
Rosalind
 

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