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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
Re: WT Film
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0892.  Wednesday, 4 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Tanya Gough <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 2 Sep 1997 09:47:31 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0886  Re: WT Film

[2]     From:   David Lindley <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 2 Sep 1997 15:27:39 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0886  Re: WT Film

[3]     From:   Karen Krebser <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 02 Sep 1997 10:02:50 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0886 _A Midwinter's Tale_ (was: Re: WT Film)


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <
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Date:           Tuesday, 2 Sep 1997 09:47:31 -0400
Subject: 8.0886  Re: WT Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0886  Re: WT Film

Peter Holland (and Bill Gelber) write:
> There was another film version of *A Winter's Tale* apart from the BBC
> version and the Japanese one that Stephen Orgel mentioned: in 1967 a
> version staged by Frank Dunlop was filmed and given limited theatre
> release in England with Laurence Harvey as Leontes and (unless my
>memory is playing interesting tricks) Jane Asher as Perdita. The best thing
> about it was a brilliant Autolycus from Jim Dale. I have no idea where a
> copy could be found.

It doesn't look like the '68 Winter's Tale is still in print, but I've
been making inquiries.  You are right that Jane Asher played Perdita,
with Diana Churchill (Paulina) and Alan Foss rounding out the cast.  If
anyone knows where a copy can be acquired (new or used), please contact
me off list.

Tanya Gough
Poor Yorick CD & Video Emporium

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <
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Date:           Tuesday, 2 Sep 1997 15:27:39 GMT
Subject: 8.0886  Re: WT Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0886  Re: WT Film

This talk of WT films has reminded me that somewhere in the dark
backward and abysm of time as a young teenager I saw a production of
this play on British TV (i.e. in the very late fifties, very early
sixties).  Or am I imagining things?

David Lindley
University of Leeds

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Krebser <
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Date:           Tuesday, 02 Sep 1997 10:02:50 -0700
Subject: 8.0886 _A Midwinter's Tale_ (was: Re: WT Film)
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0886 _A Midwinter's Tale_ (was: Re: WT Film)

> I had forgotten about MIDWINTER's TALE.I thought it was a production
> probably the result of too many beers at the local pub one
> night...thought it was poorly filmed and written though I had truly
> looked forward to seeing it I was very disappointed.

Oh, dear! I thought it was wonderful, hilarious (Ophelia's pratfall down
a set of marble steps!), well-written, and well-thought-out.  But of
course tastes differ.

One thing a person might try: rent both Branagh's _A Midwinter's Tale_
and _Hamlet_ at the same time, and then watch them both back to back,
_Midwinter_ first. It's as if Branagh is giving his audience a view into
what it's like to be writing, directing, producing, and starring in a
production of _Hamlet_, from a "backstage" perspective; and *then*
seeing a full-blown, glorious production from the perspective of a
"regular" audience, only perhaps with some knowledge or understanding of
what effort went into the production, and what may have gone on behind
the scenes that we the audience never get to see. Quite cool.

And it was delightful to see Michael Maloney ("Laertes" and "the
Dauphin" in Branagh's _Hamlet_ and _Henry V_, respectively) do so well
in a comic/romantic lead role. I hadn't ever seen him smile before, and
he makes a great "good guy."

Karen Krebser
 

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