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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
Re: BBC Distribution; Renaissance Literature Course
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0896.  Friday, 5 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Jason Rosenbaum <
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        Date:   Thursday, 4 Sep 1997 12:00:11 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0893  BBC Distribution

[2]     From:   Pat Dolan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 4 Sep 1997 09:50:51 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0891  Re: Renaissance Literature Course


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jason Rosenbaum <
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Date:           Thursday, 4 Sep 1997 12:00:11 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0893  BBC Distribution
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0893  BBC Distribution

Many of the BBC produced Shakespeare programs are available on video
from the shop at the International Shakespeare Globe Centre.  You have
the PAL/NTSC conversion problem, but anyone with a multi-system machine
would be fine.  For more info, call the ISGC exhibition office at
011-44-171-902-1500.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pat Dolan <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 4 Sep 1997 09:50:51 -0700
Subject: 8.0891  Re: Renaissance Literature Course
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0891  Re: Renaissance Literature Course

I too would like to see the what people do with the Renaissance course,
either the European Renaissance course or English.

Since this is a Shakespeare list, let me pose a problem. Many of my
Renaissance students will take the Shakespeare course as well, so I'm
reluctant to spend many weeks on Shakespeare when so many other writers
get neglected.  I figure they'll get the canonical figure elsewhere. On
the other hand, the course concerns the Renaissance, so it strikes me as
false to ignore/slight him, especially if I want the class to talk about
how the Renaissance/early modern period has been constructed by later
writers. I'm wondering how you think about this and what you do.
 

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