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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
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S H A K S P E R
Shakespeare Electronic Conference
Member Biographies - Volume 59

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*Walker, Jarrett <
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Jarrett Walker completed his Ph. D. in Drama and Humanities at Stanford
University in 1996 and his B.A from Pomona College in 1980.  His article
"Voiceless Bodies and Bodiless Voices: The Drama of Human Perception in
Coriolanus" appeared in Shakespeare Quarterly, Summer 1992.
His 1996 dissertation, "The Phenomena of Tragedy," works in the
tradition of Kenneth Burke and Elaine Scarry to understand the dualities
of body and voice, singularity and plurality in the theatre event.  The
study argues that Coriolanus is an especially fertile source for
understanding these concepts, because it presents them in a particularly
radical form.  The study concludes by developing the ideas of
instrumental interest and orificial interest as the fundamental elements
of audience attention.
His directing credits include numerous productions at both universities,
including the rarely-produced Shakespeare-Fletcher collaboration The Two
Noble Kinsmen.  He has also served as an Assistant Director at Berkeley
(now California) Shakespeare Festival.
His parallel interests include city planning.  He has written several
essays on urban design and is active in efforts to conceive the
post-automotive city.

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*Brestoff, Richard <
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I am a Phi Beta Kappa graduate (1972) of the University of California at
Berkeley's Dramatic Art department. I also hold a Master of Fine Arts
degree in Acting from NYU's School of the Arts (1975). I currently teach
in the Seattle area at Seattle Central Community College, North Seattle
Community College, Bellevue Community College, the University of
Washington and at my own studio. I am the author of two books which are:
THE CAMERA SMART ACTOR and THE GREAT ACTING TEACHERS AND THEIR METHODS,
both published by Smith and Kraus. One of my current projects is
adapting Shakespeare to the screen. I am shooting many scenes from
Shakespeare's plays in Classic continuity style (masters, two-shots,
over-the-shoulders and close-ups) to see how actors can meet the size of
the material and still remain believable. My main interest lies in
examining and extending performance traditions in order to illuminate
the living breathing, thinking, passionate characters that Shakespeare
created.

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*Dujardin, Gwynn Anne <
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Gwynn Dujardin received her BA in English from Georgetown University
(1989) and is currently a doctoral candidate in the English Department
at Northwestern University.  Her dissertation is on the relationship of
voice and hearing to "spectacle" and vision in early modern English
drama (esp.  Shakespeare, Jonson, Webster), and takes as its departure
the debate among playwrights as to whether they'd "have you wise . . .
by your ears [or] by your eyes" (Jonson, Staple of News). In addition to
early modern drama and theater studies, areas of interest include
contemporary film theory and feminist and gender studies.

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*Holmes, Jennifer <
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My name is Jennifer Holmes.  I will be a freshman this fall at Earlham
College in Richmond, IN.  I have been interested in Shakespeare for
several years, particularly The Tempest, on which I did three papers
this past year, and King Lear.

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*Conway, Helen <
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The first thing I feel I should tell you is that I am one of those
people who reads magazines from back to front... Rightly or wrongly I'm
going to link this urge directly to the urge I have now to write this
biography in the same manner. At this moment I am in Singapore. I can
hear oriental music, I know to be Chinese... saturate the air. It can't
quite seem to make it's mind up as to weather it is: (A) Sounds from the
Mongolian mountains. (B) A supermarket version of "The Hills are
Alive.." I am here to see my mother but also to make some money!! In
October I commence my final year of actor training in the tornado like
safety of East 15 Acting School in England. I can not wait to return.
Although this long holiday is helping me lay some strong foundations for
times to come.  My ambition is to work with the Royal Shakespeare
Company. I know I have the strength as an actor and it excites me
immensely to imagine myself fulfilling this goal. So this summer I'm
doing what I can to paint a "Shakespeare landscape", within my mind. I'm
trying to collate information for an essay about Shakespeare's women.
Whilst reading all I can.( If you could only here this music now!)Four
years ago I had my own theater company. I managed to fund raise and tour
a very successful play which I wrote. What else can I say? This doesn't
really feel like a biography!! I've always loved to act. When I was a
child I used to get quite emotional when I went to see a film. It was as
if I was home sick. I got involved in all sorts of things at school.
However, for years I lost a whole heep of belief in myself and lost my
way.  I knew that if I didn't turn it around and follow my dream I'd
always have regrets. So after some profound moments of contemplation and
a U.F. O. sighting....(Just kidding...About the U.F.O ...I mean...) I
got myself to drama school. It's where I am meant to be without a shadow
of a doubt.. You know when you meet some one who is doing exactly what
they are meant to be doing. How lit up they are...Well finally I am one
of those people... I hope I always will be ..

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*Richards, Tim <
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Tim Richards is an actor/director and a teacher of English as a Foreign
Language.  He recently spent three years working in Egypt and Poland,
and is now teaching foreign students at Curtin University of Technology
in Perth, Western Australia.  He lives in Fremantle, Perth's historic
port.  He recently appeared in a production of 'Macbeth', jointly
produced at the University of Western Australia by the
Grads/Undergraduate Dramatic Societies.  The production took place in
the New Fortune Theatre, an open-air theatre built on Elizabethan lines,
reputedly the only such in the Southern Hemisphere.  The production was
a full-text, traditional treatment with a large cast and used
choreographed swordfights before the opening scene and during the play.
It was well received by the audience in its three-week run.  Tim set up
a website for the play which is now functioning as a page of 'Macbeth'
links, at http://www.iinet.net.au/~parallax/macbeth.html .

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*Browne, Herschel <
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Although for many years employed as a computing professional, I received
a Master of Arts degree in English history from American University in
1985. During my studies, I had the honor of being a registered reader at
the Folger Library here in Washington, and was able to make use of its
treasures in my research. My principal periodic concentration was the
era of the industrial revolution (approximately 1760-1820), but my
studies included fairly extensive work in the Tudor-Stuart period as
well. Methodologically, I was (and am) especially interested in the use
of literary evidence within the historical discipline, which is, of
course, fraught with many dangers and pitfalls, but which can offer
surprising rewards as well.

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*Bleich, Matthew L. <
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I'm an English major and an undergraduate at Columbia University. My
interests in Shakespeare largely center on the streaks of
self-referentialism and the metaphor of theatre as life that appear
throughout his dramatic works.

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*Jung, Hae-Ryong <
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I am interested in studying Shakespeare as our contemporary, especially
what he means to us, Koreans.

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*Lee, Michelle <
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I graduated from the University of Michigan with a B.A. in Communication
in 1993 and have worked at Gale Research, a publishing company of mostly
reference books, for the past two years.  Although I am not a
Shakespearean scholar, I am very interested in Shakespeare and his
works.  I am especially interested in gender studies.

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*Peters, Raymond I.  <
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As a member of the adjunct faculty, I teach courses in business
communication at the University of Delaware. I also work as a writer,
editor, and consultant; most of my clients are in high-tech businesses.
I have not written anything scholarly about Shakespeare since graduate
school, but, with age and experience, my enthusiasm for his works
continues to grow.

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*Gretzinger, Matthew" <
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My name is Matthew Gretzinger.  I am a twenty-six year old recent
graduate of the University of Toledo with a BA in Theatre (Performance)
and a BA in English (Literature) with a concentration on Shakespeare.
I'm currently in the process of applying (& searching for) graduate
schools.  At this point I'm not certain whether I'll want an MFA in
Directing, or whether I'll prefer the PhD track so that I can one day
teach.  "The end crowns all..."  This summer I directed King Lear at the
Centre Theatre at the University of Toledo.  My previous directing
credits include Hamlet, Waiting for Godot, & Richard III in the Studio
Theatre, and Oleanna for the Toledo Experimental Shakespeare Company,
which I co-founded with Roark Littlefield.  I'm also an actor, and have
appeared as Banquo in Macbeth, as Claudius in Hamlet, as Higgins in
Pymalion and as Sir Thomas More in A Man for All Seasons.  I have a
dedicated and disciplined interest in learning anything and everything
about William Shakespeare, from reading the apocrypha to conflating
Quarto & Folio texts into potential playscripts.  My long-term goal is
to direct Shakespeare professionally.

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*Grill, Hayley <
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My name is Hayley Grill and I am an aspiring writer with a passion for
Shakespeare.  I received my BA in writing from SUNY Potsdam.  In order
to complete this degree, I wrote an undergraduate thesis.  My thesis
focised on women in Shakespeare in relation to the times in which
Shakespeare wrote.  Many poeple assume that he was sexist and his female
characters were weak.  My paper discussed this issue and disputed it.  I
focused on Kate, Juliet, Ophelia, Gertrude, and Anne.  I focused on
their strength and survival skills.  I would be happy to post it and am
seeking to submit it for publication.  The lenght is approximately 35
typed pages.  I hope that this mailing list will give me new ideas,
engage me in interesting conversation, and present me with further
writing opportunities.

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*Baker, Laurence R.  <
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I teach high school English at Mercy High School in Farmington Hills,
Michigan.  For several years I have taught a junior/senior elective
course in "Shakespeare" (English 135).  For instance, in the '97-'98
school year I will be teaching three semesters of the course.  I have a
B.A. and M.A. from the University of Michigan.

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*Quart, Abigail <
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My best friend was Joseph Papp's assistant. When he would direct,
occasionally she also became his production assistant. Then she would
insist I read the play so she would have someone with whom to argue it.
But I don't just read, I dig. Haven't been able to stop. My viewpoint is
a poet's. And a playwright's. I know that poetic and dramatic logic are
different, and Shakespeare used both with a breadth of mind that takes
my breath away. Last week I began tugging at 'temple martlet' (Macbeth,
I vi), pulling books off shelves all around me until (obvious amateur?)
I knew that a martlet was the house martin, known for dwelling in
salubrious environments, and a heraldic emblem. Whose shield is
emblazoned with martlets? Most prominently, the Catholic Arundels, loyal
supporters of Mary, Queen of Scots, English traitors. So: another nod to
James from the mouth of Banquo, his reputed ancestor, by way of 'temple
martlet.' And under the tribute, the warning that this fine dwelling
holds traitors.  Unnecessary for the dramatic logic, haunting in the
poetic. Is cooing all evening over two words in Macbeth sufficient for
your list?  If I'm wrong about 'temple martlet,' there's no one nearby
with interest enough to correct me, or argue the point. Failing
published papers, would a short play produced at the Quaigh Theater do?
Unforced Accord is a two-character examination of the day of King
Hamlet's murder, the events leading to it, and the emotional reactions
of Claudius and Gertrude, he to his crime, she to her sudden widowhood.
Or a sonnet analyzing Desdemona? I am a source of information for so
many New York performances of Shakespeare's plays.

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*Cole, Carol A.  <
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My name is Carol Cole, and I am an editorial assistant at Michigan State
University for The Historian, a quarterly professional historical
journal.  I recently finished a B.A. in English, 21 years after earning
my first degree in social work.  I am just beginning work on a master's
in English here at MSU.  I am primarily interested in medieval studies,
but I also like Shakespeare very much.  The medieval academic discussion
lists I subscribe to have been very informative; I look forward to
learning as much from SHAKSPER.

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*Bibb, Matthew <
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My name is Matt Bibb, and I am an actor and director in Los Angeles.
For several years now I have been affiliated with the UCLA Shakespeare
Reading and Performance Group. I have a B.A. in English from UCLA, and
my particular areas of study are Shakespeare in performance (including
the rather interesting problems of updating and modernization) and the
theatrical concerns raised by Elizabethan/Jacobean theater in large.

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* Koinm, Jr., Albert J. <
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Ph.D. in 1968 from the University of Texas at Austin.  My dissertation
was on the subject of seventeenth-century literature and science, and
that subject continues to be my major research interest.  I have also
been interested in currents in theology in the sixteenth and seventeenth
centuries, particularly in relation to Spenser.  While I have been
guilty of only a few papers and essays on Shakespeare, I have the
opportunity to teach an average of four courses on Shakespeare,
sophomore to graduate-level, during most years.  (Is that a tough life,
or what?)

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*Amtower, Laurel <
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My name is Laurel Amtower, and I am an Assistant Professor of English
and Comparative Literature at San Diego State University, where I
specialize in medieval literature.  I primarily teach courses on Chaucer
and other fourteenth-century authors, Arthurian Literature, and
Anglo-Saxon literature, but as well I regularly teach a course on early
British literature through Shakespeare. At the moment my research
interests focus on the reading practices of late medieval culture.

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*Wolfe, Cora Lee <
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I am a retired English teacher who acquired over the 35 years of
teaching a profound respect for the bard.  I produced as a senior class
play several of the plays over the years (I took the liberty to edit
them quite liberally, I'm afraid) and found that students really like
reciting Shakespeare.I will miss discussing him with my students and so
would like to participate in your forum.

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* Kim, Sangbum <
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I am studying in Dept of Communication at Yonsei University located in
Seoul, Korea Basically, my major is rhetoric but I am also very
interested Shakespeare's work, because  he made a great effort to
communication between writer and reader, speaker and listener with
success.  I plan to write my post-graduate thesis on this subject.  So,
I'd like to share useful information with others interested in
Shakespeare.

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*Watson, Ben <
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My name is Ben Watson, I am a high school senior, currently in the
application process for Brigham Young University, which I will probably
attend this winter.  I am 17 years old, born in Japan, son of a military
family.  My mother got me interested in Shakespeare with Kenneth
Branaugh's movie Henry V, and I have read a little Shakespeare, seen a
few movies, and studied him joyously in advanced English classes.

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*Habicht, Werner <
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Werner Habicht, Professor emeritus, Department of English, University of
Wuerzburg. - Postal address: Institut fuer Englische Philologie,
Universit

 

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