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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
Re: Criticism on the Web
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0926.  Monday, 15 September 1997.

[1]     From:   William Williams <
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        Date:   Friday, 12 Sep 1997 09:58:54 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0916  Re: Criticism on the Web

[2]     From:   Valerie White <
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        Date:   Friday, 12 Sep 1997 02:12:53 -0800
        Subj:   Re: Plagiarism and the WWW

[3]     From:   R. G. Siemens <
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        Date:   Saturday, 13 Sep 1997 09:52:50 -0600
        Subj:   Re: Criticism on the Web // EMLS


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Williams <
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Date:           Friday, 12 Sep 1997 09:58:54 -0500
Subject: 8.0916  Re: Criticism on the Web
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0916  Re: Criticism on the Web

This is an interesting, and unavoidable, thread.  The Web is there;
students will/do use it; the quality of stuff on it varies widely.  Some
means must be found, and found quickly, to tag material according to its
"refereedness" so that users, ALL users, can know what they are
getting.  This could be done in such a way as not to thwart free
expression-a sort of truth in packaging regulation.  Currently what we
have in Shakespeare, and almost all else, is a rather undigested lump.
The must be a problem that the physical scientists have confront and
probably dealt with.  How have they done it.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Valerie White <
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 >
Date:           Friday, 12 Sep 1997 02:12:53 -0800
Subject:        Re: Plagiarism and the WWW

Another way to combat plagiarism and the net is through conversation
with the student author. Many teachers/professors are incorporating an
oral grade with their essay/research paper assignments in which the
instructor and student author converse about the topic of the paper.
This type of interaction should clear up suspicions of plagiarism. Of
course on the high school level at least, this could create a time
constraint.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           R. G. Siemens <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 13 Sep 1997 09:52:50 -0600
Subject:        Re: Criticism on the Web // EMLS

This thread has been quite interesting, particularly (for me) because of
the ways in which distinction is being drawn between differing 'levels'
(if we wish to call them that) of exchange and interchange, and the
positive spirit of shared knowledge that informs the desire to make
one's work public in this way.

As editor of one of the resources that has been mentioned several times
in the exchange, however, I hesitate to comment overly much, except to
encourage those interested in such matters to browse the files at EMLS.
Below, I have attached a list of what appears in our 'journal' section
(that containing refereed materials); in addition to it, those who visit
our site will find a wide range of materials in our Interactive EMLS
section.

As well, and as suggested in a posting some weeks earlier by Joanne
Woolway, I should note that EMLS will be moving servers; the move will
take place in the next few weeks, but EMLS will, throughout this period
of transition, be able to be accessed via our PURL, at:

        http://purl.oclc.org/emls/emlshome.html

Once the move is completed, we'll post another announcement, and will
also publish our 3.2 (September 1997) issue.

As always, we are interested in considering materials for our refereed
publication, and for inclusion in our Interactive EMLS section.

With best wishes,
Ray Siemens

------ EMLS, Full Listing of Contents, 1995-7 ------

 * Regular Series:

             + Volume 1: 1.1 (April 1995) | 1.2 (August 1995) | 1.3
(December 1995)
             + Volume 2: 2.1 (April 1996) | 2.2 (August 1996) | 2.3
(December 1996)
             + Volume 3: 3.1 (May 1997)

   * Special Issue Series:

             o Number 1: New Scholarship from Old Renaissance
               Dictionaries: Applications of the Early Modern English
               Dictionaries Database. Ian Lancashire and Michael Best,
               eds. (April 1997).

     -----------------------------------------------------------------

                    Articles (Alphabetical, by Author)

        * Best, Michael, University of Victoria, BC. From Book to
          Screen: A Window on Renaissance Electronic Texts. [EMLS 1.2]
        * Best, Michael, University of Victoria, and Ian Lancashire,
          University of Toronto. New Scholarship from Old Renaissance
          Dictionaries Applications of the Early Modern English
          Dictionaries Database. Editorial Preface. [EMLS Special
          Issue 1]
        * Buick, Stephen, University of Toronto. "That purpose which
          is plain and easy to be understood": Using the Computer
          Database of Early Modern English Dictionaries to Resolve
          Problems in a Critical Edition of The Second Tome of
          Homilies (1563). [EMLS Special Issue 1]
        * Carlson, David R., University of Ottawa. Skelton and
          Barclay, Medieval and Modern. [EMLS 1.1]
        * Catt, Mark, University of Toronto. Renaissance Dictionaries
          and Shakespeare's Language: A Study of Word-meaning in
          Troilus and Cressida. [EMLS Special Issue 1]
        * Davidson, Mary Catherine, University of Toronto. Did
          Shakespeare Consciously Use Archaic English? [EMLS Special
          Issue 1]
        * Doerksen, Daniel W., University of New Brunswick. Milton and
          the Jacobean Church of England. [EMLS 1.1]
        * Downs-Gamble, Margaret, Virginia Tech. New Pleasures Prove:
          Evidence of Dialectical Disputatio in Early Modern
          Manuscript Culture. [EMLS 2.2]
        * Godshalk, W.L., University of Cincinnati. The Texts of
          Troilus and Cressida. [EMLS 1.2]
        * Graham, Jean E., College of New Jersey. "Ay me": Selfishness
          and Empathy in "Lycidas." [EMLS 2.3]
        * Hagen, Tanya, University of Toronto. An English Renaissance
          Understanding of the Word "Tragedy," 1587-1616. [EMLS
          Special Issue 1]
        * Hale, John K., University of Otago. England as Israel in
          Milton's Writings. [EMLS 2.2]
        * Hopkins, Lisa, Sheffield Hallam University. "And shall I
          die, and this unconquered?": Marlowe's Inverted Colonialism.
          [EMLS 2.2]
        * Lancashire, Ian, University of Toronto. Understanding
          Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus and the EMEDD. [EMLS Special
          Issue 1]
        * Lancashire, Ian, University of Toronto, and Michael Best,
          University of Victoria. New Scholarship from Old Renaissance
          Dictionaries Applications of the Early Modern English
          Dictionaries Database. Editorial Preface. [EMLS Special
          Issue 1]
        * Lucking, David, University of Lecce, Italy. "The price of
          one fair word": Negotiating Names in Coriolanus. [EMLS 2.1]
        * MacIntyre, Jean, University of Alberta. Production Resources
          at the Whitefriars Playhouse, 1609-1612. [EMLS 2.3]
        * Martin, Randall, University of New Brunswick. Isabella
          Whitney's " Lamentation upon the death of William
          Gruffith.". [EMLS 3.1].
        * O'Brien, Robert Viking, California State University, Chico.
          The Madness of Syracusan Antipholus. [EMLS 2.1]
        * Powers-Beck, Jeffrey, East Tennessee State University. 'Not
          Onely a Pastour, but a Lawyer also': George Herbert's Vision
          of Stuart Magistracy. [EMLS 1.2]
        * Razovsky, Helaine, Northwestern State University. Popular
          Hermeneutics: Monstrous Children in English Renaissance
          Broadside Ballads. [EMLS 2.3]
        * Roebuck, Graham, McMaster University. "This innocent worke":
          Adam and Eve, John Smith, William Wood and the North
          American Plantations. [EMLS 1.1]
        * Roth-Schwartz, Emma. "Colon and Semi-Colon in Donne's Prose
          Letters: Practice and Principle. [EMLS 3.1]
        * Schneider, Ben Ross, Jr., Lawrence University. King Lear in
          its Own Time: The Difference that Death Makes. [EMLS 1.1]
        * Sohmer, Steve. 12 June 1599: Opening Day at Shakespeare's
          Globe. [EMLS 3.1]
        * Sohmer, Steve. Certain Speculations on Hamlet, the Calendar,
          and Martin Luther. [EMLS 2.1]
        * van den Berg, Sara, University of Washington, Seattle.
          Marking his Place: Ben Jonson's Punctuation. [EMLS 1.3]
        * Vinovich, J. Michael, University of Toronto. Protocols of
          Reading: Milton and Biography. [EMLS 1.3]
        * Warren, Jonathan, University of Toronto. Reflections of an
          Electronic Scribe: Two Renaissance Dictionaries and Their
          Implicit Philosophies of Language. [EMLS Special Issue 1]
        * Williams, Andrew P., North Carolina Central University.
          Shifting Signs: Increase Mather and the Comets of 1680 and
          1682. [EMLS 1.3]
        * Winson, Patricia, University of Toronto. "A Double Spirit of
          Teaching": What Shakespeare's Teachers Teach Us. [EMLS
          Special Issue 1]
        * Yachnin, Paul, University of British Columbia. Personations:
          The Taming of the Shrew and the Limits of Theoretical
          Criticism. [EMLS 2.1]

                               Bibliography

        * Lakowski, Romuald Ian. A Bibliography of Thomas More's
          Utopia. [EMLS 1.2]

                      Notes (Alphabetical, by Author)

        * Flannagan, Roy, Ohio University. Reflections on Milton and
          Ariosto. [EMLS 2.3]
        * Hale, John K., University of Otago, NZ. Milton and the Sexy
          Seals: A Peephole into the Horton Years. [EMLS 1.3]
        * Kahan, Jeffrey, Ambroise Par

 

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