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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
Re: Web Crit; PAL; Spinoffs; Locations
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0932.  Tuesday, 16 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Mary Jane Miller <
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        Date:   Monday, 15 Sep 1997 14:46:17 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Criticism on the Web

[2]     From:   Stephen Orgel <
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        Date:   Monday, 15 Sep 1997 09:13:01 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0927  Re: Ian McKellen *Macbeth*

[3]     From:   Joanne Rochester <
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        Date:   Monday, 15 Sep 1997 12:42:31 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0931  Re: CHARACTR BIBLIO and SPINOFF BIBLIO

[4]     From:   Michele Marrapodi <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Sep 1997 11:07:50 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0919  Play Locations


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Jane Miller <
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Date:           Monday, 15 Sep 1997 14:46:17 -0400
Subject:        Re: Criticism on the Web

Mike Sirofchuck  makes a point about the opportunities on the web to
plagiarise information or whole essays. I don't think I participated in
the discussion of plagiarism last year  so would like to share a
strategy I have used since before word processing was common . I expect
students to hand in rough notes and at least two drafts of an essay. As
far as I know it is not possible to buy the raw research and it is very
difficult indeed (and not worth it) to try to fake rough notes and
earlier drafts.  Students with computer note books are told to print
their rough notes and those with access to  word processors (their own
or in computer labs) are told to print every draft. As far as I can see,
this strategy  works against all but the 'friend' who supplies both
essay and notes.

I agree that forceful cautions about the web as source - plus supplying
samples of good sites - is now part of teaching Shakespeare.

Mary Jane Miller,
Director of Dramatic Literature, Drama in Education  and Theatre Studies
Dept. of Film Studies, Dramatic and Visual Arts,
Brock University

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen Orgel <
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Date:           Monday, 15 Sep 1997 09:13:01 -0700
Subject: 8.0927  Re: Ian McKellen *Macbeth*
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0927  Re: Ian McKellen *Macbeth*

Re Bernice Kliman's question about universal VCRs, I believe the only
one available in the US that plays both PAL and NTSC (and Secam, which
only the French use) is made by AIWA; the new model, HV-MX1, which we
got this year, is really excellent, though pricy: lists at $699. This
is, however, significantly better than the previous model-the European
tapes look quite beautiful. Alternatively, many photo-processing places
will convert tapes from PAL to NTSC, and this isn't at all expensive.

Cheers,
S. Orgel

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joanne Rochester <
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Date:           Monday, 15 Sep 1997 12:42:31 -0500
Subject: 8.0931  Re: CHARACTR BIBLIO and SPINOFF BIBLIO
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0931  Re: CHARACTR BIBLIO and SPINOFF BIBLIO

> May I add one very peculiar example of "fictional biography" to Prof.
> Habichts elaborate list:
>
> Terry Pratchett, Wyrd Sisters (1989).
>
> Here a dwarf named Hwel appears, who has unmistakable features of the
> Bard himself, writing for a theatre company in Ankh-Morpork, the
> discworlds capital, while they are building a theatre appropriately
> called "The Dysk". The have a young actor in their company who bears
> resemblance to Hamlet and Henry V, since his father was killed in
> circumstances reminiscent of _Macbeth_.

This is not an instance of fictional biography, but it is a spinoff of
sorts.

Terry Pratchett also makes reference to _Midsummer Night's Dream_ in his
_Lords and Ladies_ (wherein the Diskworld is invaded by elves). A group
of Ramtops villagers (rude mechanicals, in the fullest sense of the
term) put on an unnamed "entertainment" which contains a number of
references to asses heads, walls, and bottoms.  It is performed in
celebration of the wedding of King Verance III to Magrat Garlack, local
witch, and is instrumental in opening the portal between the Diskworld
and the realm of the Elves.

Pratchett does this to a number of authors, so Shakespearians should not
feel particularly offended.

joanne rochester

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michele Marrapodi <
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Date:           Tuesday, 16 Sep 1997 11:07:50 +0200
Subject: 8.0919  Play Locations
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0919  Play Locations

> Have been trying to find work recently on the significance of "place" in
> early modern drama.  I know, for example, that Italy was considered the
> home of all things nefarious and naughty, but was wondering if we could
> be more specific.  Would there be any reasons why a play would be set
> in, say, Florence rather than Venice, Naples rather than Bologna?

One reason (indeed more than one) for the dramatic use of Italian
locations or for stage topography in general may be found in
_Shakespeare's Italy: Functions of Italian Locations in Renaissance
Drama_, ed. Michele Marrapodi, A. J. Hoenselaars, Marcello Cappuzzo and
Lino Falzon Santucci (Manchester: M. U. P., 1993). A revised paperback
edition of this volume is scheduled for October 1997.

Michele Marrapodi
University of Palermo
 

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