Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
THE TEMPEST: an opera on NPR and WWW
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0936.  Wednesday, 17 September 1997.

From:           Mark Shulgasser <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Sep 1997 21:41:49 -0500
Subject:        THE TEMPEST: an opera on NPR and WWW

The Dallas Opera's production of Lee Hoiby's THE TEMPEST will be
broadcast on NPR World of Opera on September 20, 1997 at 1:30 pm EST,
and simultaneously, the libretto will be posted on G. Schirmer's web
site. The web address is:

                http://www. schirmer. com/Tempest

The libretto is up now, and will stay up through December.

Both G. Schirmer and World of Opera are excited about this experiment.
World of Opera thinks it may be a good thing to do for all their
broadcasts. G. Schirmer has some trepidations over copyright issues but
feels that the possibilities for promoting the opera were overridingly
important. Moreover, it would seem the publisher's duty to provide the
libretto in conjunction with any hearing of the work, when possible.

Unfortunately, different local stations may broadcast the performance
any time during the two week period following the feed. However most
stations that carry will broadcast at feed-time,  the same time as the
live Metropolitan Opera broadcasts which World of Opera replaces in
off-season.

Many of the larger NPR stations are apparently happy to give opera a
breather when the Met season ends. Nevertheless, NPR World of Opera has
a large listenership all over the country.

For further info feel free to  contact me MARK SHULGASSER, librettist
<
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >

THE TEMPEST

music by LEE HOIBY

libretto  after  Shakespeare  by  Mark  Shulgasser

Dallas Opera  came  up  with a winner in Lee Hoiby's mysteriously
neglected 1986 The Tempest.   .   .  a  beautifully written modern
masterpiece  .  .  .  Caliban's Act II "Be not afeard" may be the most
beautiful aria written into an opera for nearly fifty years.

OPERA NEWS (1996)

Most of the principle roles have arias that are full of character and
even haunting.  There are extended moments of uncommon poignancy . . .
and so many other moments are superbly singable and downright beautiful.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR

Hoiby has fitted the work with advanced tonal harmonies, fascinating
timbres, effective recitative and silken lyricism. His expressive range
is complete, and from the tempestuous orchestral prelude to the
transcending lyricism of Caliban's aria, "Be not afeard", his music
continually heightens and colors the story. L'OPERA (Italy)

Hoiby's unabashedly extravagant spectacle attests to the composer's
passion for the genre and courage to preserve its cherished traditions.
OPERA NEWS (1986)

Where others have failed, Hoiby has suceeded. DES MOINES REGISTER

A 3 1/2 hour evening at the theatre  both memorable and all-too-short.
OPERA CANADA

. . . a lushly melodious, dramatically cogent setting of Shakespeare's
lyric fantasy, a work of style and substance that ought, if there is any
sense at all to the byzantine world of opera companies, to enter the
repertoire and remain there. KANSAS CITY STAR

The music began with orchestral sounds redolent of Das Rheingold and
contained many moments when the influence of Richard Strauss was
apparent. Even so the music was melodically, harmonically and musically
pure Hoiby. OPERA (London)

Mr. Hoiby writes as beautifully for three female voices as Richard
Strauss (a major influence throughout) does in "Der Rosenkavalier".

WALL STREET JOURNAL

The real star of the show is Hoiby's music, always beautifully and
colorfully orchestrated around a constant flow of melody.

FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM

The prelude to the opera is ... worthy of joining the renowned musical
storms of Verdi and Rossini. . . . .The masque for Miranda's wedding is
of such glowing warmth and power that it is often performed separately
from the opera. NOTES

The obvious complaint against Hoiby's music is his seemingly blissful
refusal to acknowledge the very existence of musical Modernism. NEW YORK
TIMES

published by G. Schirmer, Inc.
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.