Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
Re: McKellen Mac; New Globe; Spinoffs; Web Crit
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0937.  Thursday, 18 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Terry Craig <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Sep 1997 09:10:16 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Ian McKellen Macbeth

[2]     From:   Franklin J. Hildy <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Sep 1997 18:13:07 -0400
        Subj:   New Globe

[3]     From:   Matthew Gretzinger <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Sep 1997 10:41:07 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0935  Re: Spinoffs

[4]     From:   Ron Ward <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 18 Sep 1997 21:29:59 +1200 (NZST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0916  Re: Criticism on the Web


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terry Craig <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Sep 1997 09:10:16 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Ian McKellen Macbeth

Anyone interested in the Ian McKellen *Macbeth* might try The
Continental Shop in Santa Monica. Their catalog lists the film at $39.90
and I believe it's ready to play on American video systems (NTSC).

Address and Phone:

  The Continental Shop
  1619 Wilshire Boulevard
  Santa Monica, CA  90403

  (310)-453-8655

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Franklin J. Hildy <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Sep 1997 18:13:07 -0400
Subject:        New Globe

It seems that many of us saw the same production at the new Globe this
summer. For those of you who could not make it over there, do check out
"Henry V at the Globe" which will be broadcast on PBS on Nov 5th as part
of the Great Performances series.

Let me add my voice to those who have noted that Mark Rylance did not
direct the shows done at the Globe and is not directly responsible for
their short comings.  He did select the directors but his choices were
rather limited for a variety of reasons.  Like many of you on the list I
was more impressed with the theatre than the productions this summer
(enjoyed Henry V very much, found Winter's Tale embarrassing) but as one
of those who worked on this project for the last 13 years I must say
this was only to be expected. William Poel and Nugent Monck, the two men
who blazed the trail in rediscovering Elizabethan staging conventions
early in this century, always said they worked with armatures because
professional actors were too set in their ways to be able to quickly
adapt to the demands of this very different approach to performance.  We
saw this in the workshop season of 1995,  in the prologue season last
year, and in the shows this summer.  But the more experienced the actors
get with this space the better they are at using it and I understand
from those who saw the productions in the final week of the run that
they were much better by that time than they had been in June.

Ironically there are probably a lot more actors in America who would
understand how to use the Globe than there are in England but the real
problem is the directors who still think in terms of proscenium arch
theatre and TV frames and still refuse to allow anyone to help them with
understanding the special qualities of that dynamic building.  If you
saw Damon and Pythias last year you know how successful a show can be
when the director(Gaynor Macfarlane) consulted with someone who had a
solid understanding of the building-in this case Rosalind King, who had
been part of the 1995 Workshop Season.  I hope Ms Macfarlane will be
invited back again.  By contrast, the director of Two Gents last year
and the director of  Winter's Tale this year were not receptive to
assistance from those who understood the building and chose rather to
embark on  self indulgent rehearsal techniques that did not serve the
actors in preparing them to take the stage in this building.   They did
their actors a disservice and I hope they will not be asked to work at
the Globe again. The director of Henry V, Richard Olivier, did make an
honest effort to understand the unique characteristics of the Globe and
while I did not agree with his interpretation of the play there was
clearly a keen intelligence at work in this production.  Olivier seems
to have understood that this was a laboratory that needed to be
experimented with, not just another theatre like the Barbican or Drury
Lane. I hope he will be back in the future.

Modern designers are also a problem in this space.  They are not use to
factoring the decoration of a theatre when they conceive of their
design.  Henry V designer, Jenny Tiramani seems to really understand the
nature of the work being attempted at the Globe and she is Mark
Rylance's great find for the company.  They designer for Winter's Tale,
on the other hand,  just didn't get it.  He knew what the building would
look like but seem to have had no clue as to how that would impact his
design.  It would have looked great at the Barbican Pit but at the Globe
it just looked silly-one friend commented that the designer thought this
was "Leontes,Prince of Tires," but you had to see all the steel belted
radials on stage to get the joke.

All those involved are learning and the more they learn the better they
will get at using this stage-this was always the plan of the project.
Globe performances are very different form those in the West End but I
like the experience of going to the Globe and would not miss it.
Standing seems to be the best way to experience these shows and for
those who do not like the benches may I suggest the Gentlemen's
Rooms-there are chairs there.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew Gretzinger <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Sep 1997 10:41:07 -0400
Subject: 8.0935  Re: Spinoffs
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0935  Re: Spinoffs

>In _Good Omens_, by Pratchett and Neil Gaiman, reference is made to the
>rare "lost quartos" of Shakespeare, the three plays never reissued in
>folio and now lost to scholars:  _The Comedie of Robin Hoode, or, The
>Forest of Sherwoode_, _The Trapping of the Mouse_, and _Gold Diggers of
>1589_.

In reference to Gaiman, I'd like to add _The Tempest_ issue of Sandman
Comics, and an issue of the series "The Doll's House," in which
Shakespeare figures briefly as a character "who'd bargain, like Kit's
Faustus," for the "boon" of being able to write well.  There's also _A
Midsummer Night's Dream_, in which Oberon, Titania and the fairies watch
a performance of the play in which (I think) W. S. himself takes a part.

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Ward <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 18 Sep 1997 21:29:59 +1200 (NZST)
Subject: 8.0916  Re: Criticism on the Web
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0916  Re: Criticism on the Web

 Billy Houck says
>
>What we need to do is teach our students to know crap when they read it.

That requires thinking about. The expression is too loose to be sure
whether his intention is to tell student what crap is and make sure they
follow his guide lines. The faculty of good taste can not be taught. It
is a part of an adult awareness, but can be covered over by rubbish
acquired in many ways. So in a way you need to unlearn bad habits not
learn new ones.  That is an alternative view anyway.
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.