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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
Re: Helena's Entrance
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0941.  Monday, 22 September 1997.

[1]     From:   David M Richman <
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        Date:   Friday, 19 Sep 1997 12:10:07 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0938  Q: Helena's Entrance

[2]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Friday, 19 Sep 1997 16:34:17 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0939  Re: Helena


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <
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Date:           Friday, 19 Sep 1997 12:10:07 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0938  Q: Helena's Entrance
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0938  Q: Helena's Entrance

"My legs are longer though to run away."  (Quoting from memory).  We
staged Helena as always running; always in pursuit, or pursued.  For her
first entrance, she was running in pursuit of Demetrius. (She didn't
know where he was.  Hermia's line stopped her.  There are, of course,
myriad ways to stage this entrance. Good luck. David Richman

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Friday, 19 Sep 1997 16:34:17 -0400
Subject: 8.0939  Re: Helena
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0939  Re: Helena

Roger Gross writes:

>There isn't enough textual info to compel any choice we might make.  My
>choice has always (in 3 productions) been to assume that Helena was
>looking for Hermia (or perhaps just looking for a good place to cry)
>when she stumbles upon Hermia and Lysander in the midst of a bit of
>coochie-coo.  She does an abrupt about face, hoping to escape without
>being seen.  But she fails.

In Q, though not in F, Helena enters with Egeus, Hermia, Lysander, and
Demetrius in the play's first scene (TLN 24).  No exit is marked-which
isn't that unusual.  So she may exit almost anytime and then return.
But is it possible that she lurks around the borders of the scene until
she is spotted by Lysander and greeted by Hermia (TLN 190-192)?  Perhaps
she is leaving the scene when she is stopped.

Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

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