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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
Qs: Devils and Witches; Tmp Opera; Changling Video
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0942.  Monday, 22 September 1997.

[1]     From:   John Cox <
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        Date:   Saturday, 20 Sep 1997 10:51:18 -0400
        Subj:   Devils and Witches

[2]     From:   Stephen Orgel <
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        Date:   Sunday, 21 Sep 1997 22:05:02 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0936  THE TEMPEST: an opera on NPR and WWW

[3]     From:   Peter L Groves <
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        Date:   Monday, 22 Sep 1997 18:28:09 +0000
        Subj:   <Changeling> Video


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Cox <
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Date:           Saturday, 20 Sep 1997 10:51:18 -0400
Subject:        Devils and Witches

On a posting to PERFORM four years ago, Meg Twycross did some thinking
out loud about witches in early English drama.  She could not think of
any before the 1590s.

Continuing her thoughts, I wonder if that makes Shakespeare's Joan la
Pucelle the first witch on the English stage.  Can anyone verify that?
If Joan is the first, then she is doubly striking because of her
explicit pact with devils.  Keith Thomas points out that witchcraft was
identified in the popular mind with *maleficium*, i.e., mischief to
neighbors, not with a pact with the devil, which was a continental
notion and did not enter the English legal and judicial record until
after the act of 1604.  If Thomas is right, then Joan is quite an
innovation-not only the first witch on the English stage but also the
first English witch of any kind who is associated with the continental
idea of a pact with the devil.

As I've mentioned before, I'm writing a history of devils on the English
stage, so this kind of detail is important to me, and I'd be grateful
for any response.

Thanks in advance,
John Cox

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen Orgel <
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Date:           Sunday, 21 Sep 1997 22:05:02 -0700
Subject: 8.0936  THE TEMPEST: an opera on NPR and WWW
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0936  THE TEMPEST: an opera on NPR and WWW

Pure frustration: there are two NPR stations in the San Francisco area,
but neither is classical-music-friendly, the Berkeley station is too
flaky to bother with an opera of The Tempest, and the Sacramento
station, which broadcasts the Met, didn't do the Dallas Tempest this
weekend-anyway, it doesn't come in clearly enough way down here. (We get
our Met broadcasts on a commercial station.) SO: did anyone tape Hoiby's
Tempest who would be willing to copy it for me, or loan it to me to make
a copy of? I hasten to assure Mark Shulgasser that I have no commercial
intentions whatever; I just want to hear the piece.

Eagerly awaiting, etc.
S. Orgel

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter L Groves <
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Date:           Monday, 22 Sep 1997 18:28:09 +0000
Subject:        <Changeling> Video

I realise this query isn't strictly Shakespearean, but SHAKSPER  seems
like the best place to ask.  About 20-25 years ago there was  a splendid
version of <The Changeling> shown on British TV (ITV, I think), with
Helen Mirren as Beatrice-Joanna and Stanley Baker as DeFlores.  Does
anybody have any idea whether this is available on video (and if so,
where)?

Peter Groves, Monash University
 

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