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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
Re: Pronunciation of Petruchio
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0956.  Thursday, 25 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Robert M Zimmer <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Sep 1997 15:46:14 +0100 (BST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0947 Q: Pronunciation of Petruchio

[2]     From:   Dale Coye <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Sep 1997 22:27:51 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0951  Re: Pronunciation of Petruchio


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert M Zimmer <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Sep 1997 15:46:14 +0100 (BST)
Subject: 8.0947 Q: Pronunciation of Petruchio
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0947 Q: Pronunciation of Petruchio

For a thought-provoking and very funny discussion of the pronunciation
of "Petruchio"  see Random Cloud's "Shakespeare Babel" in a forthcoming
collection of essays *Reading Readings: Essays on Shakespeare Editing in
the Eighteenth Century* edited by Joanna Gondris and soon to be
published by Associated University Presses for Fairleigh Dickinson
University Press.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Coye <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Sep 1997 22:27:51 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0951  Re: Pronunciation of Petruchio
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0951  Re: Pronunciation of Petruchio

For my forthcoming book "Pronouncing Shakespeare's Words: A Guide from A
to Zounds" (Greenwood) I surveyed professors of Shakespeare from the UK,
Canada, and the US as well as some actors in order to ascertain what
practitioners are actually using today (so we don't have to go back to
Furness and Daniel Jones). The results show that in all three countries
the /k/ pronunciation is favored over the /ch/ by a 2 to one ratio.
However, there can be little doubt, I think, that Shakespeare meant to
indicate /ch/ as in match, for the reasons others have given. The
publishers of the folios and quartos knew that most people in the 17th
century would not be familiar with the orthography of Italian and would
read ch as the sound of match.  My survey also showed that Borachio is
almost always /ch/, but a few profs make it /k/- erroneously.  If only
we hadn't all read Pinnochio we wouldn't be in this mess.

Dale Coye
Dept. of Eng.
The College of New Jersey
 

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