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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
Re: Ophelia; Pronunciation of "th"; Macbeth Witches
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0966.  Friday, 26 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Louis C Swilley <
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        Date:   Thursday, 25 Sep 1997 11:06:28 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0958   Re: Ophelia

[2]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Thursday, 25 Sep 1997 17:11:38 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0956  Re: Pronunciation of  "th"

[3]     From:   Thad Q. Alexander <
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        Date:   Thursday, 25 Sep 1997 07:57:44 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0959  Q: Macbeth Witches


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis C Swilley <
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Date:           Thursday, 25 Sep 1997 11:06:28 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 8.0958   Re: Ophelia
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0958   Re: Ophelia

> But we might also look at it from dramatic perspective.  As our Welsh
> Harrier never tires of reminding us, Ophelia is a complicated figure of
> speech, not a person, and need not be accounted for by anything in
> particular outside the text.  If that figure becomes more moving and
> pertinent by singing lewd songs the songs need no other explanation.
>
> Dave Evett

I agree.  My question should not have concerned the *source* of her
songs (although your explanation of that was certainly sound), but the
*fact* of them:  what does it say of her character - and of the play -
that she should have these at hand and use them in her madness?

L. Swilley

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Thursday, 25 Sep 1997 17:11:38 -0400
Subject: 8.0956  Re: Pronunciation of  "th"
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0956  Re: Pronunciation of  "th"

Since we apparently have moved on more generally to Shakespeare's
pronunciation, I wonder about the use of "th" in such words as "murther"
and "burthen" where the "th" is usually a "d."  Was "th" always a
digraph in 16th-17th century printing? Or was it sometimes pronounced as
a "t" followed by an almost voiceless "h"?

I haven't done my homework on this, but I happened to be gazing at TLN
530 of T&C ("importlesse burthen") just before reading this posting, and
the question was on my mind.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thad Q. Alexander <
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Date:           Thursday, 25 Sep 1997 07:57:44 -0700
Subject: 8.0959  Q: Macbeth Witches
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0959  Q: Macbeth Witches

> We are producing MACBETH for our 38th season of free Shakespeare in
> Louisville, Kentucky --- I am interested in research materials regarding
> the witches --- I do have Garry Wills' excellent book WITCHES & JESUITS
> --- I have also been recommended Deborah Willis' book MALEVOLENT
> NURTURE: Witch-Hunting & Maternal Power in Early Modern England
>
> Please forward your resource suggestions to my e-mail address ---
> 
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T.A.: Curt Tofteland and others. Please either send me a copy of this
research list or post it on the list server.  Good luck and wish I could
attend your production.

Thank you
Thad Q. Alexander
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