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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
Re: Adaptations and Spoof
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0968.  Monday, 29 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Nick Clary <
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        Date:   Friday, 26 Sep 1997 11:14:37 -0400
        Subj:   Adaptations

[2]     From:   Skip Nicholson <
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        Date:   Friday, 26 Sep 1997 17:29:22 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0964  Re: Adaptations

[3]     From:   Richard A Burt <
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        Date:   Saturday, 27 Sep 1997 15:01:16 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Austin Powers R & J Spoof

[4]     From:   Andrew Walker White <
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        Date:   Saturday, 27 Sep 1997 22:40:44 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0964 Re: Adaptations


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nick Clary <
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Date:           Friday, 26 Sep 1997 11:14:37 -0400
Subject:        Adaptations

In the fall of 1991, The Tokyo Globe Company brought three plays to
London  I was fortunate enough to see the Kabuki version of Hamlet at
the Mermaid Theatre.  It was quite impressive indeed. Casting included
the doubling of Claudius and the Ghost, which is not entirely
unprecedented, but also the tripling of Hamlet, Ophelia, and Fortinbras,
for which I know no precedent.  The program notes provided a brief
history of Kabuki, which "got its start in 1603 when a foxy little nun
by the name of Okuni left her life of nunnery at Izumo Grand Shrine
behind and went to the big city of Kyoto with a group of like-minded
fellow nuns to become a star of the riverbed."  Interesting indeed.

The company offered a modern version of King Lear as well as a Kyogen
version of Falstaff (The Braggart Samurai).  Unfortunately, I did not
see these other two productions.

Nick Clary

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Nicholson <
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Date:           Friday, 26 Sep 1997 17:29:22 -0700
Subject: 8.0964  Re: Adaptations
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0964  Re: Adaptations

Hanagumi Shibai, a Tokyo "neo-Kabuki" company, does a stunning "Arashi
nochi Hare" (Sunshine after the Storm-it's _The Tempest_). Fans of
historical parallel will enjoy knowing that this group returns to many
of the original conventions of Kabuki (16th century), including the
all-male cast.

Skip Nicholson
South Pasadena (CA) HS

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A Burt <
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Date:           Saturday, 27 Sep 1997 15:01:16 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Austin Powers R & J Spoof

In case anyone's interested, here's a spoof of the balcony scene with
Jenny McCarthy as Juliet and Mike Meyers as Romeo in the film comedy
_Austin Powers_.

Cheers,
Richard

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <
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Date:           Saturday, 27 Sep 1997 22:40:44 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0964 Re: Adaptations
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0964 Re: Adaptations

There was a fine lecture last year at the University of Illinois, given
by Andrew Gurr's counterpart at the Tokyo Globe.  He went into some
detail about adaptations of The Tempest for Bunraku puppet theatre.

The first thing that has to happen, apparently, is that the cast is cut
down to a handful of characters-it takes a crew of three men to handle
one puppet, so imagine what it would look like with the usual cast of
12-15!  The Prospero character was given a puppet head which was
familiar to Japanese audiences as an exile from the Tales of Heiki
(Heiki-biwa, for the initiated).  Other central characters were
similarly drawn from other Japanese legends; the story line,
understandably, underwent quite a few changes.

Andy White
Arlington, VA
 

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