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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
Re: Two Questions; Pronunciation
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0975.  Tuesday, 30 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Sep 1997 11:36:35 +0000 (HELP)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0974   Two Questions

[2]     From:   Harry Hill <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Sep 1997 15:23:49 +0000 (HELP)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0971  Re: Pronunciation of "th"

[3]     From:   Eric Armstrong <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Sep 1997 12:55:19 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0974   Two Questions

[4]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Sep 1997 14:13:43 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0971  Re: Pronunciation of "th"

[5]     From:   Peter L Groves <
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        Date:   Tuesdayy, 30 Sep 1997 18:07:14 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0974   Two Questions


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 1997 11:36:35 +0000 (HELP)
Subject: 8.0974   Two Questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0974   Two Questions

Unstressed final pentameter [feminine/weak ending] means lying?  Not
necessarily, but lying to oneself I'd agree. Look at Lear's opening
statement on the division of powers and all its weak endings, like *Land
of Hope and Glory* being played on a honky-tonk.

        Harry Hill

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 1997 15:23:49 +0000 (HELP)
Subject: 8.0971  Re: Pronunciation of "th"
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0971  Re: Pronunciation of "th"

The always bright Andrew Walker White is right about Highland
pronunciation, although I think perhaps he is-rightly again-more
impressed by the *diction*, which renders all consonants and all the
subtle variations in vowel pattern audible. But I'm uncertain which
particular Highland accent would rhyme `move' with ' love.

        Harry Hill

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eric Armstrong <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 1997 12:55:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0974   Two Questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0974   Two Questions

Early Pronunciation: A Way with Words by Gert Ronberg has a good section
on pronunciation, and uses a variety of Elizabethan and Renaissance
texts to prove its point.

Eric Armstrong

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 1997 14:13:43 -0400
Subject: 8.0971  Re: Pronunciation of "th"
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0971  Re: Pronunciation of "th"

Well, there goes one of my pet theories shot down by a few simple
historical acts!  Thanks for the information.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter L Groves <
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Date:           Tuesdayy, 30 Sep 1997 18:07:14 +0000
Subject: 8.0974   Two Questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0974   Two Questions

> I have two requests. (1) Can someone please direct me to a good book on
> early modern pronunciation?

Fausto Cercignani, <Sh.'s Works and Elizabethan Pronunciation> (Oxford:
OUP, 1981)

> (2) Has anyone heard the following? Several of my students
> have told me that they have been taught the following: a line of poetry
> (iambic pentameter) ending on an unstressed syllable suggests that the
> speaker/persona is lying.

Intriguing nonsense.

Peter Groves, Monash.
 

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