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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
Re: Adaptations
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0978.  Tuesday, 30 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Tanya Gough <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Sep 1997 11:05:15 -0400
        Subj:   Japanese Adaptations

[2]     From:   John W. Mahon <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Sep 1997 18:00:27 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0968  Re: Adaptations and Spoof

[3]     From:   Werner Habicht <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Sep 97 19:54 MET DST
        Subj:   SHK 8.0960 Adaptations

[4]     From:   Jerry Bangham <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Sep 1997 20:05:36 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0968  Re: Adaptations - Caesar Trilogy


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 1997 11:05:15 -0400
Subject:        Japanese Adaptations

On the topic of Japanese adaptations of Shakespeare, there is an
independent troupe in Nagoya which specializes in "Rock-Kabuki" - a
modernized theatrical technique which employs modern slapstick, pop
culture references and rock music, integrated with traditional Kabuki
movement.  As far as I know, they are the only troupe in Japan to
perform Kabuki in this manner (they are also radical in their use of
female performers).  I've seen Merchant of Venice performed this way.
I've also heard tell of a Butoh version of Macbeth.  Of course, Akira
Kurosawa's films "Throne of Blood" and "Ran" spring to mind, as well.

Tanya Gough

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John W. Mahon <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 1997 18:00:27 +0000
Subject: 8.0968  Re: Adaptations and Spoof
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0968  Re: Adaptations and Spoof

There is a slip, surely, in Nick Clary's communication of 26 Sept about
Adaptations.  He refers to a Kabuki version of HAMLET in which there is
tripling of the roles of Hamlet, Ophelia, and Fortinbras.  Since Hamlet
and Ophelia engage in at least two conversations, one of them, of
course, "private," how can these roles be played by the same performer?

Puzzled in New Rochelle,
John Mahon

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Werner Habicht <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 97 19:54 MET DST
Subject: Adaptations
Comment:        SHK 8.0960 Adaptations

An adaptation of The Tempest that originated and was performed in Papua
New Guinea, entitled "Tawarina: Island of Spirits", is described (in
English) by its author, Rosalie Everest, in *Shakespeare Jahrbuch*,
1993, p.323-328. The play makes use of material (fairy tale, magic,
etc.) current in its area.

Werner Habicht

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jerry Bangham <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 1997 20:05:36 -0400
Subject: 8.0968  Re: Adaptations - Caesar Trilogy
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0968  Re: Adaptations - Caesar Trilogy

There was a brief note in the August 18th Theatre Record which mentions
the "Julius Caesar Trilogy" at the Riverside 3, a suburban London
theatre, 16-19 July.

A production was a joint effort of the Theatre du Sygne & Haiyu-Za
Theatre Companies. The trilogy comes from Julius Caesar, Antony &
Cleopatra and Life of Julius Caesar by Plutarch.

The Theatre Record reprints British theatre reviews, but there were
evidently no reviews of this production.
 

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