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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: September ::
Many Queries
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0980.  Tuesday, 30 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Jodi Clark <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Sep 1997 17:48:15 +0200 (IST)
        Subj:   Re: High School Curriculums

[2]     From:   Eduardo del Rio <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Sep 1997 12:51:23 -0500
        Subj:   CUNY Announcement

[3]     From:   Patricia Palermo <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Sep 1997 14:05:08 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Itilpa and Shalum

[4]     From:   Carl Fortunato <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Sep 97 22:40:00 -0400
        Subj:   Malvolio

[5]     From:   Jung Jimmy <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Sep 1997  0:06 -0500
        Subj:   Laughing and Crying, you know it's the same release

[6]     From:   Hiroyuki Todokoro <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Sep 1997 18:20:33 +0900
        Subj:   merry or weary?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jodi Clark <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 1997 17:48:15 +0200 (IST)
Subject:        Re: High School Curriculums

Greetings.  I am currently student teaching at a high school which
actually has a drama program.  So, I am looking to try to do some scene
work with Shakespeare, as they have had little to no exposure to it,
excepting in English class.  Right now, their grasp on the language is
minimal, at best.  They have that very typical disdain for that "old
stuff" instilled, I imagine by very boring English classes.  The only
thing they have read for me so far is Hamlet's "To be, or not to be. .
." speech.  But they even had a hard time with that.  Does anyone have
some curriculum materials they would be willing to share, or lesson plan
ideas that they have used to great success?  I will probably only have
two weeks to work on this, with 5 class sessions.  I would really like
the students to work on a scene and present it in performance in class
at the end of the unit.  Each class period is about 50 minutes.  Also,
which plays would you recommend using?

Thank you very much in advance.

Most Sincerely,
Jodi Clark
Emerson College

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eduardo del Rio <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 1997 12:51:23 -0500
Subject:        CUNY Announcement

I just noticed that in CUNY's announcement for fall events it says
Renaissance _and_ Early Modern. Is there some significance  to this?
i.e. is this a way out of the "dilemma"-to use both terms? I'm curious
to hear if anyone else is resorting to this as a way of placating both
camps?

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Palermo <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 1997 14:05:08 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Itilpa and Shalum

The epilogue to an obscure 18C play alludes to a lovesick couple named
Itilpa and Shalum who lived in "days of old."  I have checked all the
usual sources but have come up empty.  Does anyone recognize the
allusion?

Private responses are probably best--

Many thanks,
P. Palermo

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[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carl Fortunato <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 97 22:40:00 -0400
Subject:        Malvolio

I just finished directing my first play: William Shakespeare's *Twelfth
Night*, wherein I also played Feste and my wife played Olivia.  The
production was not bad, in my opinion (although there were many things I
would like to do over again:).)  We did 2 shows in Central Park and 3 in
a small 50-seat theatre on Broadway.  The ones in the Park were the
better ones (a *lot* more energy), but it was almost like doing two
different plays, which I wasn't ready for.

One thing that bothered me.  After the last show (in the theatre) an
audience member told me that she felt *so sorry* for Malvolio during the
imprisonment scene.  This was not my intention!  I very much wanted to
keep Malvolio from casting a pall over the play, I very much wanted to
avoid *any* feeling that he was a tragic figure, and I wanted the scenes
to be almost *purely* comic, with the sole exception of his appearance
at the end of Act V, when it would be okay to feel sorry for him.

I *think* I avoided this in the park, where we had his "prison" the
underside of a picnic table, on which he bumped his head a few times.
But in the theatre, we just placed him in a blue spot (no actual walls)
with a blindfold, and I'm afraid that it might have made it too dark an
atmosphere.

Has anybody seen any productions where Malvolio's imprisonment was *in
no way* tragic, and if so, how was it pulled off?

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jung Jimmy <
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Date:           Tuesday, 30 Sep 1997  0:06 -0500
Subject:        Laughing and Crying, you know it's the same release.

I was wondering if anyone had suggestions on criticism focused on how
Shakespeare handled the same material in a Comedy versus a
Tragedy/History.

This notion is undeveloped but the followng examples came to mind:

Return of soldiers in Macbeth versus Much Ado
Infidelity in Othello versus Merry Wives
Overthrown ruler in Tempest or As You Like It versus the Richards and
Henrys
What's the difference between Iago and Don John

There must be better examples, or perhaps more subtle ones, (Viola's
duel with Aguecheek compared with Hal and Hotspur? is Lady Macbeth just
a Shrew gone over board?)

I was originally thinking in terms of stories or plot elements that go
in different directions because one is tragic and the other comic, but
I'll take any thoughts or suggestions at this point.

[6]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hiroyuki Todokoro <
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Date:           Tuesday, 30 Sep 1997 18:20:33 +0900
Subject:        merry or weary?

In the Folio version of AYL, Rosalind says on arriving at the Forest of
Arden,

   O Jupiter, how merry are my spirits!

I can't find any flaw in the text, but almost all the editors emended
'merry' following Theobald into 'weary' without any plausible reason.
For example, The New Penguin says, 'Rosalind can hardly be pretending to
be merry, to encourage Celia...' in its note (p.157). Really? Is it so
unnatural that Rosalind should counterfeit to be merry to encourage
Celia? Rosalind herself says soon after that

   I could find in my heart to disgrace my man's apparel, and to cry
like a woman, but I must    comfort the weaker vessel...'

She says 'I could' (in subjunctive mood), so, if she really complains of
her weariness, as many editors wanted to act, then she is quite
illogical, isn't she?  Here she behaves as Ganymede (Jupiter's page),
and she tries to be brave.  She says her spirits are merry, in spite of
the facet that her spirits ARE weary, but isn't that what the brave do?

What's your opinion?

Cheers,
from todok whose spirits are merry!
 

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