1997

CSF Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0921.  Friday, 12 September 1997.

From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 13:43:43 -0400
Subject:        CSF Hamlet

The Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival's <italic>Hamlet</italic> will open
on September 18 at the Aronoff Center in downtown Cincinnati, with Marni
Penning playing the title role as a woman.  The decision to play Hamlet
as a woman leads inevitably to a series of changes in the script; e.g.,
Lord Hamlet becomes Lady Hamlet; he becomes she, but the major changes
are extra-textual.  Hamlet's relationship with Ophelia is a lesbian
relationship, a fact that bothers the royal family and court, and
Hamlet's relationship with Horatio is obviously heterosexual.  Penning's
Hamlet is, indeed,  bisexual.

The production is set in a fantasy Denmark in the 1990s.  The soldiers
carry 20th century weapons, and Hamlet conceals a Beretta under her
black jacket.  The swords are brought in by the visiting players, and
Hamlet gets hers directly from the player king.  Polonius is shot rather
than stabbed-though Hamlet is carrying a sword while she blows him away.

There is some strategic doubling.  William Sweeney plays the ghost of
King Hamlet, the player king, Fortinbras's captain, and the
gravedigger.  The doubling is obvious-and I get the impression that the
ghost of the dead king is continually returning in different guises.
The gravedigger disappears into his own grave-and reappears no more (in
this production).

Of course, the sex and gender changes are going to make this production
controversial-even outside of Cincinnati (possibly the most conservative
city in the US).  As one publicity agent asked, "Is Cincinnati ready for
this?"  My answer is:  Yes.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

P.S.  I'm dramaturge for the show, so I'm not a disinterested
commentator.  I think it's a daring and strong interpretation of the
script.

Re: Casting Suggestion for Shrew

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0920.  Friday, 12 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Richard J. Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 06:05:48 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0915  Re: Casting Suggestion for Shrew

[2]     From:   Richard A. Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 18:32:23 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0915  Re: Casting Suggestion for Shrew


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J. Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 06:05:48 -0700
Subject: 8.0915  Re: Casting Suggestion for Shrew
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0915  Re: Casting Suggestion for Shrew

As for Shrews, you might check out my new web page.

http://www.orednet.org/~rkennedy

Any comments or suggestions are welcome.

Kennedy

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A. Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 18:32:23 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0915  Re: Casting Suggestion for Shrew
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0915  Re: Casting Suggestion for Shrew

Does anyone know of a production of _The Taming of the Shrew_ (or
adaptation) in which Kate is played as lesbian, Petruchio her boy toy?

Best,
Richard

Re: Ian McKellen *Macbeth*

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0918.  Friday, 12 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 09:23:40 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0911  Ian McKellen *Macbeth*

[2]     From:   Ron Moyer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 9:05:32 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 8.0911  Ian McKellen *Macbeth*

[3]     From:   Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 08:36:49 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0911 Ian McKellen *Macbeth*

[4]     From:   Scott Crozier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Fridayy, 12 Sep 1997 08:59:48 +1100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0911  Ian McKellen *Macbeth*

[5]     From:   Joanne Walen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 18:42:07 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0911  Ian McKellen *Macbeth*


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 09:23:40 -0400
Subject: 8.0911  Ian McKellen *Macbeth*
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0911  Ian McKellen *Macbeth*

I haven't seen the full video text of Macbeth with McKellen and Dench
anywhere, although it may be available in PAL format.  However, we do
stock a fantastic CD-ROM in the Voyager series, which includes the full
text, accompanied by the complete audio from the RSC production Ms.
Kilman mentions.  The package is a lovely resource - the text is glossed
with "hot" terminology (click on the phrases and a definition appears);
click anywhere on the text and the audio picks up immediately at that
point (or indicates that the chosen section was cut from the
production); click on the character list and get a complete list which
includes the total number of lines spoken in the play and an index of
first lines; there are introductory essays, film clips from Orson
Welles, Polanski and Kurosawa, a picture gallery, maps of Scotland, and
two scenes presented as "Karaoke Shakespeare," wherein you can chose the
part of Macbeth or Lady Macbeth and read the text with either McKellen
or Dench.  I never get tired of it.  Suggested list price is over $65
Canadian.  We sell it through our website for $49.99 Canadian plus
shipping.

Tanya Gough

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Moyer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 9:05:32 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 8.0911  Ian McKellen *Macbeth*
Comment:        RE: SHK 8.0911  Ian McKellen *Macbeth*

Bernice,

Films for the Humanities and Sciences distributes the video of Trevor
Nunn's production of _Macbeth_ with McKellen, Dench, Rees, McDiarmid, et
al.  The FFH video is listed at $89.95; its catalog number is BAY1251.
FFH can be contacted at 800-257-5126 or 609-275-1400; FAX: 609-275-3767;
E-Mail: <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.;WWW: <http://www.films.com> (whew!).  FFH
also distributes the Nunn-McKellen _Othello_ (at $159), among other
vids.

Ron Moyer

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 08:36:49 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 8.0911 Ian McKellen *Macbeth*
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0911 Ian McKellen *Macbeth*

To Bernice Kliman: The 1979 RSC/Trevor Nunn production of *Macbeth* to
which you refer is available from The Writing Company (800-421-4246;
800-944-5432; order # FHM214V-K7; 2 VHS vc's; $149).  Because our campus
library has it in its holdings, I've been able to require it as
outside-class viewing in my undergrad S tragedies course since 1991 with
considerable success.  It's quite provocative.

Best,
Lynn

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Crozier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Fridayy, 12 Sep 1997 08:59:48 +1100
Subject: 8.0911  Ian McKellen *Macbeth*
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0911  Ian McKellen *Macbeth*

Bernice Kliman asks about the wonderful Judy Dench, Ian McKellan Macbeth
from the RSC directed by Trevor Nunn ?? It is available from  Thames
International, Academy Television, 104 Kirkstall Road, Leeds, LS3 1JS
Phone 0532 461528.

It is the best Macbeth on video I know although it does lack the
atmosphere of the original production in The Other Place, the camera
work is sensitive to the fell of the production.

Regards,
Scott Crozier

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joanne Walen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 18:42:07 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0911  Ian McKellen *Macbeth*
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0911  Ian McKellen *Macbeth*

In the 1997 Writing Company (1-800-421-4246; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.;
http://WritingCo.com/Shakespeare) catalog the '79 Trevor Nunn RCS
production with McKellen and Dench is listed at $149.

The '96 Films for the Humanities catalog lists the same video for
$89.95. They can be reached at 1-800-257-5126.

If you can run the British video system, the RSC has the tape available
for #10.99, or about $18-19.

Good luck,
Joanne
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Play Locations

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0919.  Friday, 12 September 1997.

From:           Gareth Euridge <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 09:16:32 -0400
Subject:        Play Locations

Not directly a Shakespeare question, but . . .

Have been trying to find work recently on the significance of "place" in
early modern drama.  I know, for example, that Italy was considered the
home of all things nefarious and naughty, but was wondering if we could
be more specific.  Would there be any reasons why a play would be set
in, say, Florence rather than Venice, Naples rather than Bologna?  Most
particularly, I am wondering about Massinger's _The Unnatural Combat_,
set in Marseilles.  Would this have meant anything particular to an
early mod English audience, or would it have simply signified generic
French-ness?  And what did that mean?  And how was French-ness
constructed differently than Italian-ness, or Spanish-ness?

I have had little luck so far, so would be very grateful for any help.
Please respond directly to me, or, if this thread should live, well . .
.

Gareth M. Euridge
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
http://www.denison.edu/~euridge

Re: Scene for 1 m, 1 f

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0917.  Friday, 12 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Lawrence Manley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 09:54:40 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f

[2]     From:   Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 10:17:23 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0915  Re: Casting Suggestion

[3]     From:   Roger Gross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 12:47:13 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f

[4]     From:   Thomas Berger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 14:27:43 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0914 Scene for 1 m, 1f

[5]     From:   Michael Friedman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 14:35:52 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f

[6]     From:   Matthew Bibb <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 97 10:41:29 PST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f

[7]     From:   Douglas Abel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 16:11:25 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f

[8]     From:   Keith Ghormley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 17:51:52 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lawrence Manley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 09:54:40 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f

In response to Shaula Evans' query about scenes 1m, 1f 40-somethings,
what about
MADO 4.1.255-336 (maybe a bit on the short side)
MM 2.4
Henry V, 5.2.100ff

I would guess these are all pretty difficult-they involve a lot of
subtext.  Now my question for the list, Which of these would be most
challenging, which least?

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 10:17:23 -0400
Subject: 8.0915  Re: Casting Suggestion
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0915  Re: Casting Suggestion

Much Ado, IV i, Beatrice and Benedick.

Richard III, I ii, Richard and Anne courtship.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Gross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 12:47:13 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f

Shaula Evans needs a good duet.

Take a good look at the amazing Beatrice/Benedick scene toward the end
of MUCH ADO, 4.1.  I think its one of the very best duets in
Shakespeare.  It is funny and profoundly sad, filled with tension and
decision.  Layer upon layer of subtext.

But you'll need good actors.

Roger Gross
U. of Arkansas

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas Berger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 14:27:43 EDT
Subject: 8.0914 Scene for 1 m, 1f
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0914 Scene for 1 m, 1f

Why don't you put those 40 year olds to good use and have them do the
first meeting of Romeo and Juliet, those sonnets that they toss back and
forth.  See if it "works" (ah, show biz!) for 40 year olds.  I hope it
might.

Best, tom berger

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Friedman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 14:35:52 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f

Shaula,

A likely candidate might be the "Kill Claudio" scene between Beatrice
and Benedick at the end of 4.1 in *Much Ado About Nothing*, which is
often performed as a set piece.

Michael Friedman
University of Scranton

[6]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew Bibb <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 97 10:41:29 PST
Subject: 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f

Two possible scenes come to mind, as I've been involved in productions
of both of the following, and can attest to their power apart from the
play as a whole:

Isabella and Angelo, _Measure for Measure_, Act 2, Scene 2 and Act 2,
Scene 4. If you think your actress can pull off the portrayal of a
novitiate (She is usually played as much younger than "early 40s") these
scenes can be extraordinarily powerful.

Richard and Elizabeth, _Richard III_, Act IV, Scene 4. From "Stay,
Madam; I must speak a word with you," to "Relenting fool, and shallow,
changing woman!"

These scenes share a sense of psychological warfare, gender and sexual
conflict, power corrupting the weak (although neither of these women is
as weak as their tormentors imagine)...in other words, all sorts of
juicy stuff for actors to enjoy. They also have the added benefit of
being a little less well-known than the usual "Macbeth and Lady Macbeth"
scenes that are performed so often.

     Matt Bibb
     UCLA Shakespeare Reading and Performance Group

[7]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas Abel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 16:11:25 -0600
Subject: 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f

The long scene between Richard and Elizabeth and Richard III, Act IV,
Scene 1v, ll. 197-431.  Dynamite if done well.

[8]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Keith Ghormley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 1997 17:51:52 -0500
Subject: 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0914  Scene for 1 m, 1f

Henry V, V.ii
Richard III, I.ii

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