1997

Re: Beatles' Video

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0902.  Monday, 8 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Billy Houck <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 5 Sep 1997 11:53:40 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0895  Q: Beatles Video

[2]     From:   Kenneth S. Rothwell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 5 Sep 1997 14:44:14 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0895  Q: Beatles Video

[3]     From:   Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, September 8, 1997
        Subj:   Beatles' Video


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Billy Houck <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 5 Sep 1997 11:53:40 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0895  Q: Beatles Video
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0895  Q: Beatles Video

It was called THE BEATLES LTD. or THE BEATLES, LIMITED. It was very
silly with lots of giggling girls, as I recall.

-Billy Houck

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth S. Rothwell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 5 Sep 1997 14:44:14 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0895  Q: Beatles Video
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0895  Q: Beatles Video

Dear Kevin Lawrence, I screened the Beatles episode from MND at the
NFTVA
in London last October. The videocassette that I used had eight
Shakespeare spoofs spliced in to it, all of them under the rubric of
"You've got to give em Shakespeare every time," BBC, 1974, but one was
sub-labeled "BBC TV Presents Hancock on Stage," and yet another noted
some connection with the Monty Python show that I never got straight.
The Beatles' section of 7 minutes duration was the third skit. I think
McCartney was Pyramus and Lennon, Thisby but I'm only guessing. They
play out the wall routine to the utter delight of the studio audience
who are shown in reaction shots. Then Lion appears and says, "If I was
really a lion I wouldn't be making all the money I am today, would I?"
Wonderful mugging all the way. You can book viewing time at the BFI at
the going rate, which is fairly daunting.

Speaking of a comment by another colleague about the availability of WT
on 16mm at the BBC, unless things have changed drastically in the last
few years, I wouldn't hold my breath. The BBC, I was told, exists to
transmit not to preserve. Happily into spinoffs, Ken Rothwell

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, September 8, 1997
Subject:        Beatles' Video

I recall seeing the Beatles' Pyramus and Thisby on US television.  The
details, alias, I cannot bring to mind, but I do remember the Wall bit
was quite funny.

Re: Ophelia and Claudius

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0901.  Monday, 8 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Richard Bovard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 05 Sep 1997 09:08:46 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0897  Qs: Ophelia and Claudius

[2]     From:   Richard Regan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 6 Sep 1997 00:01:53 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re:  SHK 8.0897  Qs: Ophelia and Claudius

[3]     From:   Cora Lee Wolfe <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 06 Sep 1997 06:45:35 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0897  Qs: Ophelia and Claudius

[4]     From:   Andrew Walker White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 6 Sep 1997 12:37:12 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0897 Qs: Ophelia and Claudius


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Bovard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 05 Sep 1997 09:08:46 -0500
Subject: 8.0897  Qs: Ophelia and Claudius
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0897  Qs: Ophelia and Claudius

Perhaps poor Yorick, she knew him well?  The clowns and jesters in
Shakespeare's works sing many a base tune.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Regan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 6 Sep 1997 00:01:53 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0897  Qs: Ophelia and Claudius
Comment:        Re:  SHK 8.0897  Qs: Ophelia and Claudius

Perhaps Ophelia heard the bawdy songs from the servants, and so many
times that they were in effect rehearsed in her mind.

Richard Regan
Fairfield University

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cora Lee Wolfe <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 06 Sep 1997 06:45:35 -0600
Subject: 8.0897  Qs: Ophelia and Claudius
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0897  Qs: Ophelia and Claudius

I cared for an Alzheimer's patient who before her infirmity seemed not
to understand anything of the vulgar, but who in her dementia could make
me believe that in some former life she must have been as absolutely
debauched and degraded slut.  I have no trouble believing that somewhere
in the medulla oblingata are stored songs and images that surface when
our super ego is no longer functioning..

Cora Lee Wolfe

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 6 Sep 1997 12:37:12 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0897 Qs: Ophelia and Claudius
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0897 Qs: Ophelia and Claudius

With regard to the first question, I can offer two pet theories:  one to
do with facts of childhood, the other to do with the nature of Ophelia's
madness.

As children, it is safe to say that we all relish eavesdropping on the
conversations and parties of adults.  When songs are sung, especially
ones of questionable content, we fully enjoy memorizing them, even if we
haven't got the faintest notion what they're really about-all we know is
that they are scandalous, and hence great fun to sing.  For those who
prefer Ophelia to remain true to herself, and hence an innocent, this
explains how she could have picked up such an obscene lyric.  Parties,
even before the ascendance of Claudius, would have taken a very raunchy
turn, and the Danish royal family was notorious for thoroughly debauched
parties long before the arrival of King James and his Danish Queen.
Having a child or two within earshot of the festivities more than
accounts for Ophelia's knowledge of grown-up songs.

As for why she sings it when she does, it seems to me that in her
distraction, it is the voice of Claudius, and her association of him
with these wild parties where dirty songs are sung with great spirit,
that prompts her.  Her visual and audio stimuli in these scenes are
complex, and the voice of a rowdy could certainly
trigger-involuntarily-a song of that nature, which she would certainly
_never_ sing in front of an adult if she were in her right mind.

"As for your intent on going back to Wittenburg"-one way of handling
this, which seems to work on stage, is to treat this as news Claudius
has received from Gertrude.  It is really Gertrude who wants Hamlet to
stay nearby, anxious as she is for his forgiveness for marrying so
soon.  There's no need for Claudius to hesitate here; he's been told
about the back-to-school plan, and for his own selfish reasons will not
allow Hamlet to leave the castle.  Hamlet, for his own part, can dart a
glance of betrayal towards his mother, as if he had intended to leave
quietly.  His assent, in this instance, can be very sarcastic and
bitter, since his mom has accused him of faking sorrow, and has also
barred his path back to Wittenburg.

Mere possibilities, but an example of how fertile these lines can be.

Andy White
Arlington, VA

Call for Papers: ISSEI

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0899.  Monday, 8 September 1997.

From:           Daniel Meyer-Dinkgrafe <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 05 Sep 1997 13:24:33 +0100
Subject:        Call for Papers: ISSEI

At the Sixth Conference of the International Society for the Study of
European Ideas (ISSEI), to be held at Haifa University, Israel, 16 - 21
August 1998, I will be offering two workshops.

Colleagues wishing to present a paper in one (or both) of them should
send a one-page abstract to me by January 1, 1998

WORKSHOP 1

Theatre and Consciousness: The Psychology of Performance.

Despite current emphasis on the importance of the body for theatre
performance, consciousness, although more elusive and intangible, is at
least as important for any performance to take place and be successful.
The actor's presence is at the centre of Eugenio Barba's theatre
anthropology, referring to the third organ of the body of the theatre as
"the irrational and secret temperature which renders our actions
incandescent". It is "our personal destiny. If we don't have it, no one
can teach it to us". Barba's description suggests an altered,
non-ordinary state of consciousness, which is an appropriate concept to
describe Grotowski's concept of translumination, in which the mind-body
split is overcome. On more traditional levels of understanding is the
issue of the actor's emotional involvement with the feelings the
character is supposed to be experiencing.  Diderot suggested that the
actor should maintain a distance from those emotions, should not get
involved, should keenly observe behaviour and reproduce its outward
manifestations on stage during performance.  Stanislavsky, on the other
hand, clearly advocates the actor's emotional involvement, but requires
the actor to simultaneously watch over those emotions. A kind of dual
consciousness is thus at the centre of Stanislavsky's ideas. The ancient
Indian treatise on drama and theatre, the Natyashastra appears to be
contradictory on the issue of the actor's emotional involvement: in one
passage it first states that the actor needs full concentration,
suggesting involvement, and a few lines later advises that the actor
playing an angry character should not be angry him/herself, or that an
actor playing a character who has to weep should not feel sad
him/herself. The way we understand consciousness as such will be
essential to the understanding of the relationship between theatre and
consciousness.

These are only a few issues the workshop could raise. Topics are not
limited to traditional theatre: contributions from music, dance and
performance art are also strongly invited.

WORKSHOP 2

Privileged Moments in European Literature

Not limited to drama, but extending to prose fiction and poetry, this
workshop focuses on experiences of altered states of consciousness, peak
experiences, mystic experiences or privileged moments in European
literature. Are they expressions of wishful thinking, are they metaphors
for something else,, which we have to discover in the reading process.
If they can be argued to have  a literal truth-value or near
truth-value, as Malekin and Yarrow have recently suggested (Peter
Malekin and Ralph Yarrow, *Consciousness, Literature and Theatre. Theory
and Beyond*, Basingstoke/New York: MacMillan/St. Martin's Press, 1997),
this has important implications for literary criticism!

Dr. Daniel Meyer-Dinkgrafe
Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies
University of Wales Aberystwyth
1 Laura Place, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion SY23 2AU, UK
Tel. ++44 1970 622835 Fax ++44 1970 622831 email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Fritz Leiber

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0900.  Monday, 8 September 1997.

[1]     From:   Fran Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 05 Sep 97 09:51:35 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0895  Q: Fritz Leiber

[2]     From:   Martin Jukovsky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 6 Sep 1997 00:28:54 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: Fritz Leiber


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 05 Sep 97 09:51:35 EDT
Subject: 8.0895  Q: Fritz Leiber
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0895  Q: Fritz Leiber

Re: Alan Young's query about Fritz Lieber's Hamlet: I give an account of
the production in my article, "Hamlet in the Thirties," Theatre Survey
26 (1985): 63-79. Hope that helps!

Fran T.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Jukovsky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 6 Sep 1997 00:28:54 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re: Fritz Leiber

Fritz Leiber's son was Fritz Leiber, Jr., the noted science fiction and
fantasy author, who died in 1992.  However, the grandson, Justin Leiber,
is a science fiction author who is alive and a professor of philosophy
at the University of Houston (according to the 1993 edition of THE
ENCYCLOPEDIA OF SCIENCE FICTION).  He might be able to help you with
your query.

Mr. William Shakespeare has moved

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0898.  Friday, 5 September 1997.

From:           Terry Gray <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 04 Sep 1997 17:16:41 -0700
Subject:        Mr. William Shakespeare has moved

I am pleased to announce a new edition of the Internet site "Mr. William
Shakespeare and the Internet" and, more importantly, announce that it
has moved to a new web address at:

http://daphne.palomar.edu/shakespeare/

I would appreciate getting comments-off-list-on the performance of the
new server.

Those of you who also use the site "How To Search The Web" may note that
it has also moved to:

http://daphne.palomar.edu/tgsearch/

Please update your links and bookmarks.

Terry Gray - Palomar College Library
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
http://daphne.palomar.edu/shakespeare/

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.