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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: August ::
Re: JC at the first Globe; Hamlet, Gertrude and Freud
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0836.  Monday, 11 August 1997.

[1]     From:   Peter Nockolds <
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        Date:   Sunday, 10 Aug 1997 20:09:28 +0100 (BST)
        Subj:   JC at the first Globe

[2]     From:   JoAnna Koskinen <
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        Date:   Sunday, 10 Aug 1997 12:33:42 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0832  Re: Hamlet, Gertrude and Freud


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Nockolds <
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Date:           Sunday, 10 Aug 1997 20:09:28 +0100 (BST)
Subject:        JC at the first Globe.

Does anyone else suspect a link between the name Polonius and the
content of final speech?

Polonius states that as Caesar, Brutus killed him.  His last speech in
this role begins 'I am as constant as the Northern Star...' and is
concerned with the supposed immovability of this star. When he has
finished he is assassinated.  The North Star of course indicated the
North Pole and the 'Pole' and 'Polonius' show a clear similarity.

Caesar likens himself to the Pole Star and the multitude to the other
stars.  He states that he, Caesar, is different because he doesn't move
like the multitude. He is mistaken. The Pole Star moves.  Like all the
other stars it describes a circle around the true pole.  If mariners
failed to adjust for this movement they might find themselves a hundred
miles out on their latitude.  The English natural philosopher Thomas
Harriot, a contemporary of Shakespeare, prepared detailed tables of the
motion of the Pole Star.

Is there irony in this speech?  Has Caesar failed to recognise his
common humanity?

Nautically-minded members of the audience might have thought as much,
helped by the fact that during the 1590's there was a senior justice in
the admiralty court named Dr. Julius Caesar. (I think he was chief
justice in this court in 1599 but I don't have the relevant reference to
hand).

Peter Nockolds
Richmond, Surrey, UK.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           JoAnna Koskinen <
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Date:           Sunday, 10 Aug 1997 12:33:42 -0700
Subject: 8.0832  Re: Hamlet, Gertrude and Freud
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0832  Re: Hamlet, Gertrude and Freud

Thanks to all for directing me in my research.

JoAnna
 

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