1997

Conference on Editorial Problems

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0822.  Wednesday, 6 August 1997.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 05 Aug 1997 09:40:06 -0400
Subject:        Conference on Editorial Problems

[Editor's Note: This noticed was posted on the REED List. -HMC]

CONFERENCE NOTICE AND REGISTRATION INFORMATION

**COMPUTING THE EDITION**
Problems in editing for the electronic medium

The Thirty Third Annual Conference on Editorial Problems
7-9 November 1997
University College, University of Toronto

http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/cep/
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

INVITED SPEAKERS

Julia Flanders (Brown)
Data or Wisdom? Electronic editing, empiricism and the quantification of
knowledge

John Lavagnino (Brown)
Access

Jerome McGann (Virginia)
The contradictory imperatives of eye and mind

Peter Robinson (De Montfort)
The Canterbury Tales project and other electronic editions: where next?

Peter Shillingsburg (Mississippi)
The dank cellar of electronic texts

Michael Sperberg-McQueen (Illinois at Chicago)
Why you should not teach your edition to swim

Kathryn Sutherland (Oxford)
The real presence of texts

PANELISTS  (University of Toronto)

Alex Jones  ancient science
Andrew Hughes musicology
Ian Lancashire (chair) English Renaissance literature
Keren Rice linguistics
Gary Shawver medieval studies
Jens Wollesen art history
Russon Wooldridge lexicography

The objective of the 1997 Conference on Editorial Problems is to examine
the practice of editing as it is shaped by the electonic medium, and to
explore the practiccality of the opportunities and the problems that
come from their implementation. Many believe that the future of
scholarly editing, if not specialized academic publishing generally,
lies with the electronic medium. This Conference will take stock of
major developments to date, examining critically, and from the problems
that have arisen, adumbrating the nature of scholarly editing for the
electronic medium. It will ask What are the desirable features of an
electronic edition? How is the medium affecting our conception of
editing and of the nature of text? How may we may refurbish our old
wisdom and  skills for this new medium?

The Conference will consist of papers from seven invited speakers,
followed by a panel of scholars representing a wide variety of
disciplinary perspectives at Toronto. The resulting volume will be
published in print and electronic forms  by the University of Toronto
Press. The imitative use of the computer to assist in producing an
edition for print may now be taken for granted.  The concerns of this
Conference lie, rather, in the  taken for granted. The concerns of this
Conference lie, rather, in the ext= raensions of computting beyond a
mirror-image of what we have always been abe to do.  Thus its subject
consists of the practical and theoretical problmes arising from new
kinds of processing and analysis the rapid  interactivity between editor
or reader and the data; and the plethora of choices in what an
electronic scholarly edition might be or do. Recent achievements and
current projects dispel any doubt that the dividends of computing the
edition are great, but they also show that these dividends have
far-reaching and disturbing consequences.  It is not simply that the
choices we face are difficult, or even that the most positive and
seemingly least problematic dividends challenge old ideas. The creative
disturbance to our status quo originates in the objectification of
editorial practice that computerization entails in the perceptual shift
to a view of source material as data.  Furthermore, the digital gift of
including so much more in an edition than was formerly possible means a
rethinking of what we consider to be data, what processes constitute
editing, indeed what we mean by "scholarly" and others.

Convenors
Willard McCarty  King's College London
Fred Unwalla  Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, Toronto

Conference Coordinator
Jennifer Forbes University of Toronto


LOCATION

The Conference will take place at University College in the University
of Toronto.

Travel information and a detailed map will be sent with the conference
fee receipt.

Internet Access
All attendees will be offered access to the Internet, from which they
may reach their regular e-mail accounts as well as browse the web.
Computers with on-line access will be made available at Robarts Library
and at other locations on campus.

ACCOMMODATION

All hotels detailed here will have rooms available during the
conference.  For all hotels the cut-off date for guaranteed reservations
at the conference price is 7 October 1997 (i.e. one month before the
start of the conference.  When making their reservations, all guests are
asked to quote the conference name, "The Conference on Editorial
Problems" to qualify for the conference rate. Conference rates cannot be
guaranteed on days other than 7-9 November, though all hotels will try
to be accomodating.  Any special arrangements (non-smoking rooms,
whellchair accesible rooms, etc.,  must be made directly with the hotel
concerned. People wishing to stay later or arrive earlier will have to
make their own arrangements with the particular hotel.  It is bext to
make reservations early to ensure requirements are met. All hotel rates
are in Canadian funds and do not include taxes (the taxes on hotel rooms
are the Goods and Service Tax at 7% and the Provincial Sales Tax at
5%).   Many hotels have penalties for cancellations, early departures
etc.  Please check all charges, potential penalites and other conditions
with the hotel prior to booking.

List of Hotels
Quality Hotel Midtown
280 Bloor St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 1V8
phone: (416) 968-0010 fax:  (416) 968-7765
Toll free reservations:  1-800-228-5151
$72 plus taxes (1 person) $84 plus taxes (2 people)

Venture Inn Toronto Yorkville
89 Avenue Rd, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5R 2G3
phone: (416) 964-1220 fax: (416) 964-8692
Toll free reservations: 1-800-387-3933
$75 plus taxes for singles or doubles

Park Plaza Hotel
4 Avenue Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5R 2E8
phone: (416) 924-5471 fax: (416) 924-4933
Toll free reservations: 1-800-977-4197
$149.00 plus taxes for singles or doubles

Hotel Inter-Continental Toronto
220 Bloor St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 1T8
phone: (416) 960-5200 fax: (416) 324-5920
Toll free reservations: 1-800-267-0010
$165.00 singles, $185.00 doubles plus taxes

Each guest must make his or her own reservations directly with the hotel
and is responsible for any and all hotel charges and special
arrangements. Please quote "Conference on Editorial Problems" when
booking. For all hotels the cut-off date for guaranteed reservations at
the conference price is October 7, 1997.

REGISTRATION FORM

Name:

Institution:

Address:




Email:

Tel:

Fax:


REGISTRATION FEE

[      ] Full (includes papers, reception, banquet &  Saturday lunch:$90
[      ] Partial  (excludes reception & banquet): $70
[      ] Student (with Saturday lunch):$40
[      ] Student (papers only):$30
Students wishing to attend the Friday reception and the  banquet must
pay for Full registration

I require a vegetarian (ovo-lacto) menu  [      ] (please tick)

Canadian or US currency only. Cheques or money orders should be made
payable to the 'Conference on Editorial Problems'.

Please note that no refunds will be awarded to cancellations received
after 7 October 1997. Prior to that date a service charge of $15 will be
levied on all
cancellations.

Numbers are limited to 100 for the conference so early registration is
advised. The conference fee can be paid in advance with this form or
on-site, but a $35 surcharge will be required for all on-site
registrations.

Please return this form along with your registration fee to:

Jennifer Forbes,
CEP97,
PIMS,
University of Toronto,
59 Queens Park Crescent East,
Toronto, Ontario,
M5S 2C3 CANADA

Re: JC at the First Globe

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0821.  Wednesday, 6 August 1997.

[1]     From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 05 Aug 1997 13:44:41 -0600
        Subj:   JC at the First Globe

[2]     From:   Peter Nockolds <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 6 Aug 1997 11:16:05 +0100 (BST)
        Subj:   'JC' at the Globe


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 05 Aug 1997 13:44:41 -0600
Subject:        JC at the First Globe

John Drakakis wrote

> There is a brief account of a Globe performance  of JC probably in
> the early autumn of 1599.

Assuming John means the Platter account, then "probably" is misplaced in
this sentence. Platter certainly saw the play on 21 September, but
described it only as "the tragedy of the first Emperor Julius Caesar"
and the venue as "the straw-thatched house". Both the first Globe and
the Rose had thatched roofs, and the Admiral's men did plays about
Julius Caesar in 1594-5 and 1602. The Swan too had a thatched roof but
it was closed.

So, the tricky bit is eliminating the possibility that Platter saw
Henslowe's players doing a play about JC at the Rose on 21 Sept 1599.
Steve Sohmer draws upon the Henslowe's account book receipts which
appear to show a dip in takings at the Rose when, according to Sohmer,
the Globe opened. But the receipts are a confusing and possibly
incomplete record. Henslowe's receipts end on 3 June and start again on
6 October, which might mean the Rose was closed for the summer.  (Carol
Chillington Rutter takes this view in _Documents of the Rose_).  But
records of the Admiral's men touring seem to START again in autumn 1599
(Gurr _The Playing Companies_ p255) and they get paid for performing in
Coventry on 28 Dec 1599 two days before Henslowe records a weekly take
for the Rose.

Must we give up Henslowe's records being takings at the Rose? Did the
company split into two groups, one of whom toured while the other worked
at the Rose? Did Henslowe record the takings of the touring company?

If the Henslowe record falls under suspicion then a major reason for
thinking that Platter saw Shakespeare's JC-the absence of such a play in
Henslowe's records for 1599--disappears.

Gabriel Egan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Nockolds <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 6 Aug 1997 11:16:05 +0100 (BST)
Subject:        'JC' at the Globe

Steve Sohmer appears to have misread one of his sources.  According  to
Thomas, 'Religion and the Decline of Magic' (p352, as cited, Sohmer
para.18),the traditional time for new ventures was 'the rising Moon',
that is when the Moon is increasing in light.  This seems to be borne
out by the quotations which Sohmer supplies (note 6).

According to rules given under the entry 'Elections' in de Vore's
'Encyclopaedia of Astrology' (Littlefield, Adams & Co. Totowa, New
Jersey, 1977) the best part of the lunar cycle for new ventures is from
three days after the conjunction of Moon and Sun to three days before
the full Moon, that is on those days when the Moon is increasing in
light most rapidly. The conjunction of Moon and Sun was not necessarily
an auspicious time for the launch of a new venture.

The conjunction which Sohmer has selected fell in square to the malefic
Saturn. (Venus and not Saturn which was the fifth planet in the stellium
in the constellation of Gemini noted in para.16) If the play began
between noon and ten to three Saturn would have been in the ascendant.
Both these indications are traditionally unfortunate, as confirmed both
by de Vore, by William Lilly's Christian Astrology of 1647, and
doubtless by many other sources.

If the proprietors of the Globe were following 'standard' astrological
doctrine of their day I would think it unlikely that they would have
chosen 12th June 1599 as an opening date.

Yours sincerely
Peter Nockolds

Richmond, Surrey, UK.

(I imagine that the 40 volumes of papers of Simon Forman give many
indications of Elizabethan astrological practice.)

Re: Shakespeare at Stratford; Shakes&Co

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0819.  Wednesday, 6 August 1997.

[1]     From:   Tom Simone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Aug 1997 09:42:42 +0100
        Subj:   Alex Jennings in Stratford

[2]     From:   Don Rowan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Aug 1997 14:22:16 GMT-400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0818  Q: Shakespeare at Stratford

[3]     From:   Virginia M. Byrne <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Aug 1997 18:01:11 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0818 Q: Shakespeare at Stratford

[4]     From:   G. L. Horton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 05 Aug 1997 10:01:38
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0816  Re: Actors at Shakes&Co. , New Globe


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Simone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Aug 1997 09:42:42 +0100
Subject:        Alex Jennings in Stratford

This is a brief reply to the inquiry of Sylvia Schmidt about Alex
Jennings.  I have also seen him in PEER GYNT (fabulous John Barton
production at the Swan in 94), DREAM, MEASURE, and also his first RSC
lea, I believe, as Richard II in ?1992.

This year in Stratford he is doing both Benedick in ADO and Hamlet.  I
found the ADO to be a very good production, a bit melancholy, but that's
ok given the tragi/comic mix.  There was large unit set that seemed to
represent vanishing sight line a la renaissance perspective.  The visual
theme of on stage portraits was interesting with one rather vulgar and
cheap usage to depict the supposed infidelity of Hero.

Jennings was  a strong and engaging Benedick although I found the
Beatrice of ?Sinead Redman to be unconvincing.  The 82/83 production
with Jacobi and Sinead Cusak is my favorite version.

The HAMLET, directed by Matthew Warchus, is certainly untraditional with
a modern setting, deletion of 1.1, and the use of various cinematic
images.  The opening with Hamlet pouring a libation at his father's tomb
with a loudspeaker voice over of Claudius' opening lines of 1.2 was
startling to a traditional Shakespearean like myself.  On the gray wall
backdrop there was a large projection of a home style movie of old
Hamlet (the splendid Edward Petherbridge) and the young boy Hamlet.  I
learned at a workshop that the boy in the movie is Alex Jennings's son.

My first response was guarded, but I found that Jennings delivered an
amazingly articulate and passionate Hamlet.  By far the best portrayal
of Hamlet I've ever seen.  And while I am generally a supporter of
Branagh's film efforts, I found Jennings a clearly superior Hamlet.
Speaking of film, I found a notable influence of the Zeffirelli HAMLET
on various aspects of this production, partly echoed by the recurring
film elements.

Part of the strength of this HAMLET  was its defamiliarizing the play
for devotess of the play.  It seemed like a different work in many ways
than I read in the text(s), but I ultimately found that good.  This was
an unconventional but passionate and intelligent encounter with HAMLET
with a superb Hamlet.  I would consider going back to England to see it
again.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Rowan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Aug 1997 14:22:16 GMT-400
Subject: 8.0818  Q: Shakespeare at Stratford
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0818  Q: Shakespeare at Stratford

Dear Sylvia: I would be extremely grateful if you could send me your
reactions to the MND at Stratford. I am an Associate Editor of the
Variorum MND responsible particularly for staging and stage-history.
Anything you can tell me about the production, which for a number of
reasons I shall not be able to see, would be most welcome. D.F.  Rowan,
"Don", This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Virginia M. Byrne <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Aug 1997 18:01:11 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0818 Q: Shakespeare at Stratford
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0818 Q: Shakespeare at Stratford

I saw Alex Jennings in both also...didn't care for him...hated his
Hamlet too frenetic...Benedick a bit better but I was tainted after
seeing his Hamlet and being disappointed...best Hamlet I've seen was in
Boston two seasons ago ..Cambell Scott...did you see the mysteries this
year?

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           G. L. Horton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 05 Aug 1997 10:01:38
Subject: 8.0816  Re: Actors at Shakes&Co. , New Globe
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0816  Re: Actors at Shakes&Co. , New Globe

Steve Neville said
>What impressed me most, however,
>was Edward Petheridge's portrayal of Krapp in  Beckett's _Krapp's Last
>Tape_  a mere hour and a half after his fine performance as Cymbeline.
>Brilliant.

I just saw Shakespeare & Co.'s (Lenox, MA)  and     go from Hal and
Hotspur in Henry4 pt 1 to Jerry and Robert in Pinter's "Betrayal", from
performances scaled for an outdoor stage the size of a football field to
the intimacy of Wharton's drawing room theatre, seating perhaps 50.  I
also saw the student company's MND, and a small-cast WT.  All
excellent.  I will be reviewing these productions for AisleSay, but I
write slowly (about 1 review per week) and I want to recommend them to
SHAKSPERians while there is still time to see them all.

Re: New Globe

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0820.  Wednesday, 6 August 1997.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 05 Aug 1997 07:45:19 +0000 (HELP)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0816 Re: New Globe

[2]     From:   Eric Armstrong <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Aug 1997 20:49:30 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: Globe and not being a groundling.

[3]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 6 Aug 1997 05:07:10 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 8.0816  Re: New Globe


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 05 Aug 1997 07:45:19 +0000 (HELP)
Subject: 8.0816 Re: New Globe
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0816 Re: New Globe

Krapp right after Cymbeline

It may have been a `brilliant' performance of Krapp an hour and a half
after playing Cymbeline, but the actual feat is rather easy, if I may
say so, since to act Krapp is a strangely relaxing process once one has
left the rehearsal weeks. There is a great deal of that gripping
motionlessness that so affects the spectator, for instance; the extreme
focus needed to play with the meanings of one's eyes and their telling
brows is akin to the concentration of meditation or prayer that leaves
one elevated and exhausted afterwards and promotes a beautifully sound
sleep once at home and the audience tossing in their newly existential
beds.

        Harry Hill

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eric Armstrong <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Aug 1997 20:49:30 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re: Globe and not being a groundling.

I saw Henry the Fift at the new Globe and had a problem that I believe
hasn't been mentioned so far: I got a really bad sunburn. My wife and I
had (rather uncomfortable) seats in the second gallery, right in the
middle, the day that Hillary Clinton came to see the show. Not only did
we not get in until her Highness had taken her seat, keeping us from
seeing the theatre until the last moment, amidst a crush of people
struggling to get in, but she only stayed for the first act. The stage
is carefully placed so the actors don't have the sun in their eyes, but
as a result, the audience DOES. This makes it quite difficult to see the
stage. Because of fire regulations (which are stiff, the Globe being the
only thatched building in London) you are not allowed to stand in the
aisle to get into the shade and can't move down to the cool confines of
the groundlings with out a ticket.  For this reason I think that the
groundlings had the best seats in the house and they were far cheaper
too!

Grumblingly,
Eric Armstrong

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 6 Aug 1997 05:07:10 -0400
Subject: Re: New Globe
Comment:        SHK 8.0816  Re: New Globe

The 'New Globe' is wholly and delightfully an American venture and
should be applauded as such. It embodies an American view of history
(that the past can be coralled, domesticated, and thus escaped from).
This strikes me as entirely admirable, provided its audiences realize
that what's on offer is an experience as quintessential -and as
remarkable- as the Grand Canyon, Times Square or the singing of Bessie
Smith. Unfortunately, it is being marketed as something quite different.
This suggests that, whereas the inscription over the entrance to the
'original' Globe was "Totus Mundus Agit Histrionem", the one over the
entrance to its successor should read "Caveat Emptor". Either that, or
"Play It Again, Sam".

Terence Hawkes

Q: Shakespeare at Stratford

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0818.  Tuesday, 5 August 1997.

From:           Sylvia Schmidt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, August 5, 1997
Subject:        Shakespeare at Stratford

I would be interested in hearing some thoughts and observations from
people who have seen "Hamlet" and "Much Ado" in this year's RSC
productions - both about the productions as a whole and Alex Jennings in
particular. I saw him in "Measure for Measure" and "Midsummer Night's
Dream" as well as "Peer Gynt" in 1994 and he was superb, especially in
his portrayal of Angelo as a stiff-necked puritan horrified by his own
baser urges and torn apart by his inner conflict.

Thank you,
Sylvia Schmidt

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