1997

Job at Folger Library

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0807.  Thursday, 31 July 1997.

From:           C. Jenise Williamson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, July 30, 1997
Subject:        Job at Folger Library

[Editor's Note: This announcement appeared July 17, 1997, on Associated
Writing Programs  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>. -HMC]

Dear AWP Job List subscribers:

Here is an update for a job posted last month. An extended job list will
be posted shortly.

REVISED Submission for AWP Job List

 -----------------------------
Poetry and Lectures Coordinator:  Salary mid to upper 20's.  Excellent
benefits.  Reports to Director of Museum & Public Programs.  B.A. in
English, advanced degree preferred.  In-depth and on-going knowledge of
modern literature required.  Three to five years' experience in arts
administration, including fundraising, grant writing, and budget
preparation and implementation.  As part of the Folger's Public
Programs, designs, administers and arranges the Folger Poetry and
Lecture Series.  Researches, selects and contracts speakers and poets
for series' programs.  As part of the Folger development effort,
identifies and solicits funding sources for programs, prepares grant
applications and proposals, and leads the Folger Poetry Advisory Board
in the organization of fundraising activities.  Responsible for
administration of poetry and lecture series budget.  Administers the
Hardison Poetry Prize Endowment fund and program and the Lannan Poetry
Fellowship Program with area universities.  Serves on the Board of
Directors of the Poetry Committee of the Greater Washington, D.C.  Area
and maintains contact with national literary organizations.  Supports
the promotion of the series and other Public Programs in the preparation
of announcements, invitations, and brochures.  Send cover letter and
resume to Folger Shakespeare Library, Attn:  Poet, 201 E. Capitol St.,
S.E., WDC 20003-1094.  No phone calls please.  EOE.  DEADLINE FOR
RESUMES HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO SEPTEMBER 2, 1997.

Qs: Actor's Identity; Harwood's _The Dresser_ and

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0806.  Thursday, 31 July 1997.

[1]     From:   Rodney G Higginbotham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 19:56:13 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Actor's  Identity

[2]     From:   Ching-Hsi Perng <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 31 Jul 1997 16:39:30 +0800
        Subj:   Harwood's _The Dresser_  and  _Lear_



[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rodney G Higginbotham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 19:56:13 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Actor's  Identity

I recently picked up an old print in an antique shop of an actor in the
role of Falstaff.  I haven't had any luck identifying the actor;
therefore, I seek the assistance of fellow list members.  I've scanned
the image to the following web page:

http://www.neiu.edu/users/urghiggi/fals.htm

Please take a look and let me know.  If you wish to contact me off-list,
I am at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Many thanks.
Rodney Higinbotham

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ching-Hsi Perng <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 31 Jul 1997 16:39:30 +0800
Subject:        Harwood's _The Dresser_  and  _Lear_

Does anyone know of any comment on the relationship between _King Lear_
and Ronald Harwood's _The Dresser_?  As a translator of the latter I
would appreciate any information on this.

Sincerely,
Ching-Hsi Perng
National Taiwan University
Taipei, Taiwan

Re: New Globe; Radio; Birthday

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0804.  Thursday, 31 July 1997.

[1]     From:   John McWilliams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 12:50:38  +0100
        Subj:   The New/Old Globe

[2]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 14:57:58 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Shakespeare on Radio; John Barrymore

[3]     From:   Paul Nelsen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 09:24:45 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0803  Juliet's Birthday


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John McWilliams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 12:50:38  +0100
Subject:        The New/Old Globe

To go back to the old debate about The New Globe, I went yesterday and
it was fairly poor. They performed 'The Winter's Tale' which was a
pretty silly choice in the circumstances: the atmosphere generated by
tourists continually walking through the standing room in front of the
stage, putting their rucksacks down for a few minutes, looking bored and
then going away again hardly allows you to be carried away by this
magical 'old tale'. And the production wasn't great anyway. It was quite
interesting actually to see the thing reconstructed having seen
pictures/diagrams etc.  and this did give some idea of atmosphere and
staging (and a well performed comedy might work well here), but
otherwise it did seem very Disneylandesque.

Has anyone seen anything else there that worked better?

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 14:57:58 -0400
Subject:        Re: Shakespeare on Radio; John Barrymore

I have a set of the 1937 radio broadcasts on the Ariel label.  Although
I have not listened to them in many years, I recall that they are worth
the trouble to find-for the amusement, not for any brilliant acting or
interesting insights.  Bogart. for example, presents a uniquely
slow-speaking Hotspur.  I admit it was a novel approach.

By the way, anyone who has a chance to see Christopher Plummer's
"Barrymore" at the Music Box theater in New York will find the effort
most rewarding.  The play (a monologue, really) portrays the has-been
Jack Barrymore trying to make a comeback in 1941 in a one-night only
reprise of his first and greatest legitimate triumph, Richard III.
Plummer has captured Barrymore's style, voice, mannerisms and appearance
perfectly.  On the night I attended he received a 10 or 15-minute
standing ovation which, so far as I can see, was enthusiastically joined
by everyone in the audience.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Nelsen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 09:24:45 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0803  Juliet's Birthday
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0803  Juliet's Birthday

> Has anyone any suggestions on how I can obtain further information on the
>saints days which might have been known to Shakespeare?

A fertile source to begin with is Francois Laroque's *Shakespeare's
Festive World: Elizabethan Seasonal Entertainment and the Professional
Stage* available in a translation by Janet Lloyd (Cambridge: Cambridge
U.P. 1993).  The bibliography itself will prove very helpful in
developing an expanded reading list. A terrific index enhances the
usefulness of this volume.

I'd add that Michael Bristol's *Carnival and Theatre* (1985) and Robert
Weimann's *Shakespeare and the Popular Tradition in the Theatre* are
also key references.

Paul Nelsen
Marlboro College

Call for Videos

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0805.  Thursday, 31 July 1997.

From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 08:34:21 -0400
Subject:        Call for Videos

Greetings to you all.

Many thanks for all your interest in my endeavor, and special thanks to
all of you who have already placed orders or made inquiries into our
Shakespeare multimedia list.

I am currently looking to expand our inventory to include festival and
community theatre productions.  Please contact me directly if you have
or know of any commercial videos produced in conjunction with any of
your local university, community or established theatre groups.

We have just acquired several copies of the Russian "Twelfth Night"
(1956), and we will be adding a range of audio spoken word and film
soundtracks to our list shortly.  Keep an eye on our website for
updates.

Thanks again,
Tanya Gough

Juliet's Birthday

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0803.  Wednesday, 30 July 1997.

From:           Peter Nockolds <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Jul 1997 23:09:54 +0100 (BST)
Subject:        Juliet's Birthday

30th July 1997

Juliet's Birthday

In Romeo and Juliet the nurse says

    Even or odde, of all daies in the yeare come Lammas Eve at night,
shal
    she be fourteen.

In a current French calendar of saints 30th July is the feast of St.
Juliette, so was Juliet really born on an even-numbered day, the 30th,
shortly before midnight?

I've managed to trace the feast day of this saint - under the name
Julitta - back to a calendar of saints from the 1660's, but no
further.   I've tried all the calendars of saints I could find in the
British Library, but these are clearly not comprehensive. There were
various reforms of the calendar of saints, with certain changes of
dates, in the late 16th and early 17th century. Has anyone any
suggestions on how I can obtain further information on the saints days
which might have been known to Shakespeare?

Peter Nockolds
Richmond, Surrey, UK

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