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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: July ::
Re: Identities; Thesis; Plagiarism
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0771.  Friday, 18 July 1997.

[1]     From:   Richard Regan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Jul 1997 21:44:46 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0767 Fake/Real Identities, SHREW-inspired

[2]     From:   Tanya Gough <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Jul 1997 12:57:36 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 8.0763  Help with Thesis

[3]     From:   John Velz <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Jul 1997 10:07:16 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Plagiarism


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Regan <
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Date:           Thursday, 17 Jul 1997 21:44:46 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0767 Fake/Real Identities, SHREW-inspired
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0767 Fake/Real Identities, SHREW-inspired

Presumably, there is a real Sir Topas (Feste) in Twelfth Night.  Walter
Blunt learns, along with "many marching in his coats," that it's not
always good to be the king in 1 Henry IV.  Masked balls provide
effective situations for disguise for the ladies in Love's Labor's Lost,
and  an unhappy one for Benedick, who is abused "past the endurance of a
block" in Much Ado. The Merry Wives is full of impersonation, as is The
Taming of the Shrew (Tranio for Lucentio, besides your own example.)

Richard Regan
Fairfield University

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 17 Jul 1997 12:57:36 -0400
Subject: Help with Thesis
Comment:        SHK 8.0763  Help with Thesis

 > I am looking for videotaped (VCR, Beta, Laser Disc) performances
(both
 > amateur and professional) of Shakespeare's Hamlet, Macbeth, and
Othello
 > in either the US or Great Britain in the past century for my thesis
on
 > Shakespeare's women in performance. I am especially interested in
early
 > productions of this century (prior to the late 1950's).

I own a CD & Video Shop in Stratford, Ontario, adjacent to the Stratford
Festival's Avon Theatre.  We carry an extensive (although not yet
complete) catalog of Shakespeare multimedia titles - I believe the
current list includes approximately 50 titles.  I'd be happy to e-mail
you our current list, if that will help.  You might be interested in the
following titles, which I do have in stock at the moment:

Midsummer's Night Dream - 1960's BBC (with Benny Hill as Bottom!) As You
Like It - 1936 (Elisabeth Bergner and Laurence Olivier) Taming of the
Shrew - 1950 (modern dress, w/ Charleton Heston and Lisa Kirk)

I also usually have the 1913 Italian Antony and Cleopatra (silent, b&w),
and the 1928 Tempest with John Barrymore. I'm out of stock at the
moment, but I can try to get them in again.  I've also got most of the
major studio productions, and I'd like to point out that many of the
Olivier and Welles productions fall into your time frame.

You can contact me through the list or directly:

Tanya Gough
Poor Yorick - CD & Video Emporium
89A Downie Street, Stratford, Ontario, Canada  N5A 1W8
voice: (519) 272-1999
fax: (519) 272-0979

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[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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Date:           Thursday, 17 Jul 1997 10:07:16 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Plagiarism

About plagiarism of scholarship & crit. on Shak.  What I used to do if I
did not recognize the source was to give the student a pop quiz on the
vocabulary of the doubtful passage(s); "Give a short definition of each
of the following words, and use each of them in a sentence that does not
appear in the paper, but which reveals the meaning of the word."  They
always failed it, sometimes cried.  I failed them in the course but did
not get them expelled from Uni.

John Velz
Quondam Prof. of English
U of Texas, Austin
 

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