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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: July ::
Re: New Globe; Radio; Birthday
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0804.  Thursday, 31 July 1997.

[1]     From:   John McWilliams <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 12:50:38  +0100
        Subj:   The New/Old Globe

[2]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 14:57:58 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Shakespeare on Radio; John Barrymore

[3]     From:   Paul Nelsen <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 09:24:45 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0803  Juliet's Birthday


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John McWilliams <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 12:50:38  +0100
Subject:        The New/Old Globe

To go back to the old debate about The New Globe, I went yesterday and
it was fairly poor. They performed 'The Winter's Tale' which was a
pretty silly choice in the circumstances: the atmosphere generated by
tourists continually walking through the standing room in front of the
stage, putting their rucksacks down for a few minutes, looking bored and
then going away again hardly allows you to be carried away by this
magical 'old tale'. And the production wasn't great anyway. It was quite
interesting actually to see the thing reconstructed having seen
pictures/diagrams etc.  and this did give some idea of atmosphere and
staging (and a well performed comedy might work well here), but
otherwise it did seem very Disneylandesque.

Has anyone seen anything else there that worked better?

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 14:57:58 -0400
Subject:        Re: Shakespeare on Radio; John Barrymore

I have a set of the 1937 radio broadcasts on the Ariel label.  Although
I have not listened to them in many years, I recall that they are worth
the trouble to find-for the amusement, not for any brilliant acting or
interesting insights.  Bogart. for example, presents a uniquely
slow-speaking Hotspur.  I admit it was a novel approach.

By the way, anyone who has a chance to see Christopher Plummer's
"Barrymore" at the Music Box theater in New York will find the effort
most rewarding.  The play (a monologue, really) portrays the has-been
Jack Barrymore trying to make a comeback in 1941 in a one-night only
reprise of his first and greatest legitimate triumph, Richard III.
Plummer has captured Barrymore's style, voice, mannerisms and appearance
perfectly.  On the night I attended he received a 10 or 15-minute
standing ovation which, so far as I can see, was enthusiastically joined
by everyone in the audience.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Nelsen <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Jul 1997 09:24:45 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0803  Juliet's Birthday
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0803  Juliet's Birthday

> Has anyone any suggestions on how I can obtain further information on the
>saints days which might have been known to Shakespeare?

A fertile source to begin with is Francois Laroque's *Shakespeare's
Festive World: Elizabethan Seasonal Entertainment and the Professional
Stage* available in a translation by Janet Lloyd (Cambridge: Cambridge
U.P. 1993).  The bibliography itself will prove very helpful in
developing an expanded reading list. A terrific index enhances the
usefulness of this volume.

I'd add that Michael Bristol's *Carnival and Theatre* (1985) and Robert
Weimann's *Shakespeare and the Popular Tradition in the Theatre* are
also key references.

Paul Nelsen
Marlboro College
 

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