1997

Shakespeare and Astrology

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0730.  Monday, 30 June 1997.

From:           Peter Nockolds <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Jun 1997 14:32:17 +0100 (BST)
Subject:        Shakespeare and Astrology

May I announce my web-site, EGMA, to SHAKSPERians.

It's now widely recognised that Chaucer constructed his narratives
taking account of the movements and positions of heavenly bodies on
certain dates.  My research shows that Shakespeare did the same.  You
don't have to believe in astrology to accept that Shakespeare may have
had an interest in this subject.

Once this is recognised it opens all sorts of possibilities.  In the
current posting I give a general introduction to the topic.  Further
articles show how The Winter's Tale was inspired by an event in
Bohemia,  how  it is possible to date Titus Andronicus from astrological
imagery, and how two words  usually amended by editors were not
misprints.

The URL is http://www.sonnet.co.uk/egma/

Best wishes,
Peter Nockolds

Re: Recent Editions: *Lear*; Hamlet's Madness

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0729.  Monday, 30 June 1997.

[1]     From:   Louis Marder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 6 Jul 1997 21:13:42 PST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0724  Q: Recent Editions

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 29 Jun 1997 13:42:50 -0700
        Subj:   RE: SHK 8.0721  Re: *Lear*

[3]     From:   Carl Fortunato <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 29 Jun 97 15:39:00 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Hamlet's Madness


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Marder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 6 Jul 1997 21:13:42 PST
Subject: 8.0724  Q: Recent Editions
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0724  Q: Recent Editions

Dear Barrett:  I can't place my hand on my copy at this moment, but
there was a book published a few years ago called Which Shakespeare.  It
lists the current issues, describes their virtues and shortcomings, and
makes recommendations.  The book costs $99!!!  There are many good
editions not mentioned there.  Your choice should depend on the level of
your students.  There are those with great glossaries or great notes.
Some give a lot of textual emendation.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 29 Jun 1997 13:42:50 -0700
Subject: 8.0721  Re: *Lear*
Comment:        RE: SHK 8.0721  Re: *Lear*

>I think in this play "the gods" function as God, and are being used to
>set a fine Druid mood (only half-successfully).  Your point is a *very*
>good one.  Sort of "weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in
>the morning."  This idea seems very strong during the storm ("you
>houseless poverty"), but it is certainly not made explicit, and one
>would think that it would be.

Thanks for your kudos.  I actually think that the joy which cometh in
the morning never comes in _Lear_, for the simple reason that it's set
in pre-Christian times.  Degradation, then, does not point towards
redemption in the world of the play, though it may very well imply
redemption to the Elizabethan audience.  They, after all, are Christian,
and can see the Deus Absconditus as implying a Deus Revelatus.  That
this insight is not expressed by any of the pre-Christian characters of
the play is only to be expected.

Cheers,
Sean.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carl Fortunato <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 29 Jun 97 15:39:00 -0400
Subject:        Re: Hamlet's Madness

> From:           E. H. Pearlman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

> On the subject of Hamlet's madness, the definitive statement was
> offered by Willima Schwenk Gilbert, who said, if I remember correctly,
> that Hamlet was "idiotically sane with lucid intervals of lunacy."  E.
> Pearlman

I think it was Oscar Wilde (if I'm wrong, correct me) who said, "The
question of Hamlet is, are the critics mad or only pretending to be?"

Accommodation in London

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0727.  Monday, 30 June 1997.

From:           Karen Bamford <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 29 Jun 1997 17:36:48 -0300
Subject:        Accommodation in London

Fully furnished London flat available Sept. 15-March 15; in Twickenham
(west end of Greater London), five minutes from British Rail station
(frequent service to Waterloo); 2 bedrooms, electric shower, automatic
washing machine; 495 pounds per month.

Karen Bamford
Dept. of English
Mount Allison University
Sackville, NB  CANADA
E0A 3C0
(506) 364-2543; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Terror and Magnificence

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0728.  Monday, 30 June 1997.

[1]     From:   Douglas M Lanier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 29 Jun 1997 15:08:04 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0722  Terror and Magnificence

[2]     From:   Carl Fortunato <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 29 Jun 97 15:39:00 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0722  Terror and Ma


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas M Lanier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 29 Jun 1997 15:08:04 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0722  Terror and Magnificence
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0722  Terror and Magnificence

In reply to Jimmy Jung's query about John Harle's Terror and
Magnificence:

I have heard it, and it is rather pleasant, though not particularly
memorable.  Elvis Costello's singing is, IMHO, the best reason to give
it a try;  it's not particularly illuminating in its setting of the
Shakespeare texts.

Cheers,
Douglas Lanier

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carl Fortunato <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 29 Jun 97 15:39:00 -0400
Subject: 8.0722  Terror and Ma
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0722  Terror and Ma

> I've been piling up SHAKSPER e-mails since early May, so maybe I
> missed it; but has anyone heard John Harle's new album Terror &
> Magnificence?
> "Elvis Costello sings three Shakespeare songs set to music by Jazz
> Saxophonist John Harle"

> I think the songs are from 12th Night and I was wondering how it
> sounded, especially after having to sing "Come away, death," once
> myself.

Why just that one song? Feste sings *all* the songs.

I'm playing Feste this autumn, and I have to write the music to the
songs myself.  I'm not sure I want to get an album, since I'd like the
music to be as original as possible, and I don't think jazz is what I
have in mind. Right now, I'm gravitating toward the blues for "Come
away, death" and country for "Oh, mistress mine."  I'm not sure *what*
to do with "The rain it raineth every day" but I think that one may have
to be traditional minstrel style.  I want 12th Night to seem like an
actual musical, if possible.

When you sang it, where did you get the music, and what kind of music
was it?

Plays Shakespeare Didn't Publish

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0726.  Saturday, 28 June 1997.

From:           Gwenette Gaddis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 27 Jun 1997 13:30:36 -0500
Subject:        Plays Shakespeare Didn't Publish (fwd)

Have a laugh, folks.


From:   Erik Yocum[SMTP:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.]
Sent:   Friday, June 27, 1997 1:16 PM
To:     This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Subject:        Top5 - 6/25/97 - Plays Shakespeare Didn't Publish (fwd)

                        June 25, 1997

       The Top 16 Plays Shakespeare Chose Not to Publish

16> Christopher Marlowe Can Kiss My Elizabethan Ass

15> Henry VIII, I Am, I Am

14> Fast Times at Verona High

13> A Midsummer Night's Nocturnal Emission

12> Om'let

11> Love's Fing'r Pulled

10> Romeo & Steve

 9> Twelfth Night, Children Stay Free

 8> Felines

 7> Henry VIII was a Big Fat Idiot

 6> Six Degrees of Francis Bacon

 5> Stratford-upon-Avon 90210

 4> Hamlet II - Where the hell is everybody?

 3> Romeo & Michelle's High School Reunion

 2> King Gump

And the Number 1 Play Shakespeare Chose Not to Publish...

 1> Booty Calleth

[ This list copyright 1997 by Chris White and Ziff Davis, Inc. ]

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