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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: June ::
Re: Speaking the Verse
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0619.  Monday, 2 June 1997.

[1]     From:   Stephen Schultz <
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        Date:   Friday, 30 May 97 12:04:18 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0610  Re: Speaking the Verse

[2]     From:   Charles Frey <
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        Date:   Friday, 30 May 1997 11:33:54 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0610  Re: Speaking the Verse


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen Schultz <
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Date:           Friday, 30 May 97 12:04:18 EDT
Subject: 8.0610  Re: Speaking the Verse
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0610  Re: Speaking the Verse

Before we get too far down the tempting paths pointed to by the
Gross/Tate exchange, would someone propose definitions of "rhythm,"
"meter," and "style" which will distinguish each from the other two and
perhaps also propose ways of making clear when we are meaning "style of
speech or acting" as opposed to "style of writing"?  These words  seem
to me to get easily confused.  Or we (meaning "the whole world") seem
to get easily confused when using these words.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charles Frey <
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 >
Date:           Friday, 30 May 1997 11:33:54 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 8.0610  Re: Speaking the Verse
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0610  Re: Speaking the Verse

Concerning the question raised as to whether the new Norton Shakespeare
provides guidance to students about relations of meter and content in
Shakespeare, I think the answer is:  no, it does not.  While its editors
in their preface concede a need for pedagogical apparatus expected in an
edition oriented toward students, they don't provide, so far as I can
tell, any explanation for students of Shakespeare's meter, blank verse,
or rhythmic effects.  Considering the amount of authorial energy that
went into the creation of metrical rhythms and considering the
importance of those rhythms to our cognitive and emotive responses, this
editorial omission seems to me little short of astounding, a bit like
telling students in a music course to listen for the meaning of the
music but not notice the rhythms.  Some may view the omission as the
inevitable result of an anti-esthetic bias among new historicist
editors, but the Norton General Introduction does purport to introduce
Shakespeare's "play of language.."  It just ignores meter and rhythm
Why?

Charles Frey
 

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