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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: June ::
Re: Pronunciation
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0664.  Monday, 16 June 1997.

[1]     From:   Ron Ward <
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        Date:   Saturday, 14 Jun 1997 00:15:55 +1200 (NZST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0660  Re: Pronunciation

[2]     From:   Dale Lyles <
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        Date:   Saturday, 14 Jun 1997 08:15:35 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0660 Re: Pronunciation


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Ward <
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Date:           Saturday, 14 Jun 1997 00:15:55 +1200 (NZST)
Subject: 8.0660  Re: Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0660  Re: Pronunciation

Accents in King John could be French as John probably knew little
English.  You can go too far, with a John Wayne accent for Macbeth as
one famous comic does it. Some contrast between the rustics and the
nobility needs to be maintained and this can highlight the variety that
existed.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Lyles <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 14 Jun 1997 08:15:35 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0660 Re: Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0660 Re: Pronunciation

David Richman recalls a Feste whose Sir Topas sounded like Billy
Graham...  Ours sounded like Ernest Angsley, and it worked even better:
the actor got the cadences, the shrieks, and even the smacks to
Malvolio's forehead ("Be HEALED!") exactly right.  That raised an
interesting frisson, actually: since Malvolio was a "kind of Puritan",
Sir Topas must have been Church of England, come to correct him.  Our
fundamentalist Sir Topas was exactly the opposite of what the script
indicated.

Oh, well, anything for a laugh, as Bill used to say.

Dale Lyles
Newnan Community Theatre Company
 

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