Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: June ::
Re: Pronunciation
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0677.  Wednesday, 18 June 1997.

[1]     From:   Anna I. Mueller <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Jun 1997 09:45:14 MET
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0673  Re: Pronunciation

[2]     From:   Andrew Walker White <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Jun 1997 11:15:47 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0673 Re: Pronunciation


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anna I. Mueller <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 18 Jun 1997 09:45:14 MET
Subject: 8.0673  Re: Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0673  Re: Pronunciation

Now that we're still talking pronunciation: are there any recordings at
all  of actors reading (attempting to read) Early Modern English (as
there are for  Middle and Old English)?

Any suggestions welcome.

Thank you,
Anna I. Mueller

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 18 Jun 1997 11:15:47 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0673 Re: Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0673 Re: Pronunciation

A friend of mine here in Arlington, VA, toured England with a
Shakespeare troupe in the late 60's (the one that spawned Ms.
Linklater's work in voice production, it turns out), and he distinctly
recalls using his home-grown Kentucky mountain dialect in a scene from
one of the histories in front of John Barton.  Rhymes that seemed
impossible suddenly began to appear, and Barton was left scrambling for
the text.

Given the colorful Scottish dialects which are still in use today, and
that dialect's subsequent evolution here in the States, I'm all for the
idea of producing plays at the New Globe with the thickest of brogues;
where else in the English language can you find "love" rhyming with
"move", for instance?

It's my understanding that RP is a form of English that is utilitarian
in nature, whose sole virtue is that it can be universally understood.
Given Shakespeare's love of dialect and certain character types, I hope
we can look forward to more productions under Mr. Rylance's direction
that chuck the BBC's diction out the window.

Andy White
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.