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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: June ::
Re: CSF MM; Textual Problem
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0681.  Wednesday, 18 June 1997.

[1]     From:   W.  L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Jun 1997 22:22:16 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0671  Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival Measure for
Measure

[2]     From:   Rosalind King <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Jun 1997 10:17:56 GMT0BST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0665  Re: Textual Problem in 1 Henry IV?



[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W.  L. Godshalk <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Jun 1997 22:22:16 -0400
Subject: 8.0671  Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival Measure for
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0671  Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival Measure for
Measure

I'd like to add a note on the conclusion of this production.  Isabella
(Marni Penning) removes her wimple in the last scene-a suggestion that
she will not be returning to the convent.  But the production ends with
a hesitation dance, as Kenney (the Duke) and Penning embrace, move
apart, and finally stand looking at each other (Kenney with longing
eyes) across the now empty stage. Will they, or won't they? The
ambiguity seems right on target.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rosalind King <
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Date:           Wednesday, 18 Jun 1997 10:17:56 GMT0BST
Subject: 8.0665  Re: Textual Problem in 1 Henry IV?
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0665  Re: Textual Problem in 1 Henry IV?

I encountered similar difficulties with the word 'which' when preparing
the text for the production of Damon and Pythias at the Globe last
summer. eg.

The old man is sober, the young man rash, the lover triumphing in joys,
The matron grave, the harlot wild and full of wanton toys -
Which all in one course they no wise do agree,
So correspondent to their kind their speeches ought to be.

Here 'which' obviously refers to the old man, the young man the lover ,
matron and harlot, not toys.

The following caused our actors some difficulty, but the repeated (to
us) odd usages of 'which' here are not exactly incorrect. In line 3 it
refers to Pythias but in line 6 it means 'about anyone who' (i.e. any of
the 'we' engaged in hot talk).   Eubulus is specifically referring to
Dionysius, but being a good courtier keeps his criticism suitably veiled
-the awkwardness is thus in keeping with the difficulty of addressing a
tyrant.

Nothing have I done but this: in talk I over-thwarted Eubulus
When he lamented Pythias' case to King Dionysius,
Which tomorrow shall die but for that false knave Damon -
He hath left his friend in the briars  and now is gone.
We grew so hot in talk, that Eubulus protested plainly
Which held  his ear open to parasitical flattery,
And now in the King's ear like a bell he  rings,
Crying that flatterers have been the destroyers of kings -
Which talk in Dionysius' heart hath made so deep impression,
That he trusteth me not as heretofore in no condition,

As is so often the case, the difficulty is for the reader, not (once the
performer knows how to point the line) for the listener - it simply
mirrors the slight dislocations prevalent in ordinary speech.

Yours,
Rosalind King
School of English and Drama
Queen Mary and Westfield College
University of London
 

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