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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: June ::
Re: Accents and Pronunciation
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0691.  Friday, 20 June 1997.

[1]     From:   Joseph Tate <
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        Date:   Thursday, 19 Jun 1997 19:41:55 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0686  Re: Accents and Pronunciation

[2]     From:   Syd Kasten <
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        Date:   Friday, 20 Jun 1997 08:02:52 +0200 (IST)
        Subj:   Pronunciation


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joseph Tate <
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Date:           Thursday, 19 Jun 1997 19:41:55 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 8.0686  Re: Accents and Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0686  Re: Accents and Pronunciation

If Jonathan Hope is addressing the lack of commentary on accent in the
plays, I'd suggest a look at *Henry V*, a play which is very aware of
the accents of its characters.

Joseph M. Tate
U. of Washington, Seattle

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Syd Kasten <
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Date:           Friday, 20 Jun 1997 08:02:52 +0200 (IST)
Subject:        Pronunciation

Anthony Burgess wrote a book, whose name I don't remember, about the
death of the poet Keats, in which among other things he discussed the
pronunciation of the poet's name.  He suggested that it should be closer
to "kates" than to "keets", basing himself on what he perceived as
Shakespearian pronunciation.  He proposed that this vocalization of
"ea", persisting today sometimes before the letter "r" (wear, bear tear
etc.) would illuminate puns otherwise hidden.  One selection he offered
that sticks in my mind (I am not Shakespearian enough to remember the
source) goes "love has its reasons" where love is compared to a cake
with its raisins.

Best wishes,
Syd Kasten
 

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