Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: June ::
Re: Accents and Pronunciation: N. Broadsides, H5, H6,
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0707.  Wednesday, 25 June 1997.

[1]     From:   Gabriel Egan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 24 Jun 1997 14:10:16 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0702   Accents and Pronunciation

[2]     From:   Wes Folkerth <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 24 Jun 1997 10:01:11 -0400
        Subj:   Accents and pronunciation

[3]     From:   Bill Gelber <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 24 Jun 1997 09:46:25 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0702  Re: Accents and Pronunciation

[4]     From:   Joseph Tate <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 25 Jun 1997 00:04:11 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Shylock's Speech


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 24 Jun 1997 14:10:16 -0600
Subject: 8.0702   Accents and Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0702   Accents and Pronunciation

I can't make a contribution on accents, but Dave Evett solicits comments
on Northern Broadsides.

The best show in the Wanamaker Globe 'prologue' season (autumn 96) was
the Northern Broadsides Midsummer Night's Dream. An especially thrilling
moment was when Bottom, in support of the claim "I could play 'Erc'les",
noticed and pointed to the keystone of the central opening upon which
was depicted Hercules supporting the globe. In imitation of this
picture, Bottom raised his joint-stool over his head, and his theatrical
colleagues looked back and forth between the boastful clownish claimant
to the role and the ideal embedded in the fabric theatre.

The company arrived at the Globe in the morning, rehearsed in the
afternoon, and performed in the evening. (Presumably that's what an
Elizabethan touring company would do in a new town). The metatheatrical
resonances of Pyramis and Thisbe were undoubtedly amplified by authentic
staging conditions.

Gabriel Egan

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Wes Folkerth <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 24 Jun 1997 10:01:11 -0400
Subject:        Accents and pronunciation

Speaking of accents and pronunciation, I was wondering if anyone on the
list knew whether or not the real Henry V spoke French?  One would
imagine, given his noble upbringing, and time spent on the Continent,
that he could probably have managed at least a little "franglais."

Wes Folkerth

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Gelber <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 24 Jun 1997 09:46:25 -0700
Subject: 8.0702  Re: Accents and Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0702  Re: Accents and Pronunciation

Lisa Hopkins was talking about the possible French accents in Henry VI,
and I was reminded of Peggy Ashcroft's French accent in the Wars of the
Roses which I thought very effective (although at times the "w" sound
which replaced the "r" reminded of parodies of Barbara Walters).  She
also played the character on the Caedmon recording of Richard III with
Robert Stephens and used the accent for Margaret again there. What
struck me though was the idea that she was now speaking English but
retaining some of her former accent.

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joseph Tate <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Jun 1997 00:04:11 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Shylock's Speech

In regards to the recent postings on pronunciation, I have a question
regarding Shylock's English.

Although certainly speaking a fluent English, Shylock's speech often
repeats words and sounds to an extreme that a character feels justified
to mock.

In 1.3.1-7 Shylock simply repeats all that Bassanio says and ends each
line with "well." The scene with Tubal in 3.1 especially: "What, what,
what? Ill luck, ill luck?" and "I am very glad of it. I'll plague him,
I'll torture him. I am glad of it." Those are only two of the lines of
many from 3.1. In 4.1 his long speech responding to the Duke repeats the
words pig, cat, answer, reason, etc. a number of times.

Shylock's repetition is even mocked by Solanio in 2.8:

As the dog Jew did utter in the streets:
"My daughter! O, my ducats! O, my daughter!
Fled with a Christian! O, my Christian ducats!
Justice, the law! My ducats, and my daughter! ...

Could this repetitive speech that Solanio mocks be an instance of rage
unable to find other words or possibly a foreigner unable to find other
words?

Joseph Tate
Graduate Student
Department of English
U. of Washington, Seattle
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.