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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: June ::
Re: Recent Editions: *Lear*; Hamlet's Madness
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0729.  Monday, 30 June 1997.

[1]     From:   Louis Marder <
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        Date:   Sunday, 6 Jul 1997 21:13:42 PST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0724  Q: Recent Editions

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Sunday, 29 Jun 1997 13:42:50 -0700
        Subj:   RE: SHK 8.0721  Re: *Lear*

[3]     From:   Carl Fortunato <
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        Date:   Sunday, 29 Jun 97 15:39:00 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Hamlet's Madness


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Marder <
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Date:           Sunday, 6 Jul 1997 21:13:42 PST
Subject: 8.0724  Q: Recent Editions
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0724  Q: Recent Editions

Dear Barrett:  I can't place my hand on my copy at this moment, but
there was a book published a few years ago called Which Shakespeare.  It
lists the current issues, describes their virtues and shortcomings, and
makes recommendations.  The book costs $99!!!  There are many good
editions not mentioned there.  Your choice should depend on the level of
your students.  There are those with great glossaries or great notes.
Some give a lot of textual emendation.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Sunday, 29 Jun 1997 13:42:50 -0700
Subject: 8.0721  Re: *Lear*
Comment:        RE: SHK 8.0721  Re: *Lear*

>I think in this play "the gods" function as God, and are being used to
>set a fine Druid mood (only half-successfully).  Your point is a *very*
>good one.  Sort of "weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in
>the morning."  This idea seems very strong during the storm ("you
>houseless poverty"), but it is certainly not made explicit, and one
>would think that it would be.

Thanks for your kudos.  I actually think that the joy which cometh in
the morning never comes in _Lear_, for the simple reason that it's set
in pre-Christian times.  Degradation, then, does not point towards
redemption in the world of the play, though it may very well imply
redemption to the Elizabethan audience.  They, after all, are Christian,
and can see the Deus Absconditus as implying a Deus Revelatus.  That
this insight is not expressed by any of the pre-Christian characters of
the play is only to be expected.

Cheers,
Sean.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carl Fortunato <
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Date:           Sunday, 29 Jun 97 15:39:00 -0400
Subject:        Re: Hamlet's Madness

> From:           E. H. Pearlman <
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> On the subject of Hamlet's madness, the definitive statement was
> offered by Willima Schwenk Gilbert, who said, if I remember correctly,
> that Hamlet was "idiotically sane with lucid intervals of lunacy."  E.
> Pearlman

I think it was Oscar Wilde (if I'm wrong, correct me) who said, "The
question of Hamlet is, are the critics mad or only pretending to be?"
 

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