1997

Re: Middleton Edition

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0650.  Tuesday, 10 June 1997.

[1]     From:   Richard Dutton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 1997 11:39:00 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 8.0647  Q: Middleton

[2]     From:   Richard A Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 09 Jun 1997 12:14:38 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0647  Q: Middleton


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Dutton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Jun 1997 11:39:00 +0100
Subject: 8.0647  Q: Middleton
Comment:        RE: SHK 8.0647  Q: Middleton

Gareth Euridge asks about the Oxford Middleton. I am a somewhat
interested party myself, since I am doing a (completely separate)
edition of Four Middleton Plays for the World's Classics. So I asked
Gary Taylor when I met him in Washington, immediately after the
Shakespeare Association meeting, in April. He told me then that he
expected to submit final copy this summer. So I imagine it will be some
time before the edition is
published.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 09 Jun 1997 12:14:38 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0647  Q: Middleton
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0647  Q: Middleton

Re: Gary Taylor's Middleton edition.  Last Gary told the contributors
and editors (SAA), there is no expected date of publication.  Gary says
that the edition and companion volume of criticism will be published.
He just can't say when at this point.

Best,
Richard Burt

Re: English Xenophobia; Nationalism

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0649.  Tuesday, 10 June 1997.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 09 Jun 1997 07:50:52 +0000 (HELP)
        Subj:   English Xenophobia

[2]     From:   Andrew Murphy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 97 15:44:18 BST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0647 Q: Nationalism


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 09 Jun 1997 07:50:52 +0000 (HELP)
Subject:        English Xenophobia

When I made it down to the last eight out of three hundred for a
directing apprenticeship at Granada Television in Manchester in 1963, I
saw clearly the prevailing elitism of the English, when I from Aberdeen
and another lad from Leeds were passed over in favour of six Oxbridge
boys.  Of course I suppose they may have been better..

When my Aberdonian friend Mildred Imray was hired as the BBC "continuity
girl" her first name was changed to June and her vowels went through the
same sort of training as Eliza Doolitle.

The superb North American actor Douglas Campbell's Glasgow "u"'s had to
soften themselves a bit. Nowadays, however, a provincially accented
speech is considered colo[u]rful, thank heavens.

My own recording of "A Funeral Elegy" has one Aberdeen vowel in it that
a Canadian colleague noticed...to my shame, as I thought I'd anglicized
the whole thing.

        Harry Hill

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Murphy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Jun 97 15:44:18 BST
Subject: 8.0647 Q: Nationalism
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0647 Q: Nationalism

Actually, Philip Edwards wrote about the anomaly of England's becoming a
'sceptred isle' in _RII_ as long ago as 1979 (_Threshold of a Nation_).
There is now quite a rich literature on Shakespeare & nationalism-see,
eg, the relevant sections of Richard Helgerson's _Forms of Nationhood_
and very interesting recent work on Renaissance lit & the 'British
problem' by Willy Maley. A new collection of essays on _Shakespeare &
National Culture_ was published just recently, edited by John Joughin
and published by Manchester University Press (UK) / St Martins Press
(US).

Andrew Murphy

Qs: Rhyming; A&EB; Middleton; Nationalism

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0647.  Monday, 9 June 1997.

[1]     From:   Ron Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 06 Jun 1997 10:24:14 -0400
        Subj:   Historic Question--rhyming

[2]     From:   John Robinson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 6 Jun 1997 23:27:02 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   A&EB

[3]     From:   Gareth Euridge <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 08 Jun 1997 10:58:37 -0400
        Subj:   Middleton

[4]     From:   Ron Ward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 8 Jun 1997 10:04:23 +1200 (NZST)
        Subj:   Nationalism in S


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 06 Jun 1997 10:24:14 -0400
Subject:        Historic Question--rhyming

Looking at the rhyming in Othello (Iago to Desdemona, Brabantio & the
Duke), I'm wondering if, in Shakespeare's day, this would have
represented a typical kind of English discourse, an "elite" type of
English discourse, or rather something that only the super subtle
Venetians would engage in.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Robinson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 6 Jun 1997 23:27:02 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        A&EB

Does anyone know if the journal Analytical & Enumerative Bibliography
(Northern Illinios U.) is still active. I have tried to e-mail the
editor William P. Williams but my e-mail is always returned undelivered.
Please don't give me his e-mail address...IT DOESN"T WORK.

Thanks for your time.

John Robinson

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gareth Euridge <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 08 Jun 1997 10:58:37 -0400
Subject:        Middleton

Does anyone know when Gary Taylor's _Complete Works Middleton_ is going
to hit the shelves?  BIP is silent, OCLC mute, and Ohiolink dumb.  I've
just noticed a few mentions here and there.
Thanks,
Gareth M. Euridge

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Ward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 8 Jun 1997 10:04:23 +1200 (NZST)
Subject:        Nationalism in S

Has anyone noticed the peculiar parochialism in the famous  Act 2 scene
1 speech of Gaunt in Richard II. He talks of a sceptred Isle and talks
as if the whole Island is England, when of course it was not, even if
there were claims against Scotland it seems a strange thing that he then
refers to England and not Great Britain or Britain. Is this a Freudian
slip. There is a long history of the English ignoring the Scots. In fact
there was considerable action after the Act of Union in 1707 to change
the name of the integrated country to England. Even in the 19th century
there was anti Scots feeling.

Was this deliberate on Shakespeare's part. Showing the limited view of
Gaunt or what? I think there may be references in Lear and Cymbeline to
Britain rather than England.

Re: Rhyming

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0648.  Tuesday, 10 June 1997.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 09 Jun 1997 07:29:38 +0000 (HELP)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0647  Q:

[2]     From:   Joseph Tate <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 1997 18:33:11 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0647  Qs: Rhyming


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 09 Jun 1997 07:29:38 +0000 (HELP)
Subject: 8.0647  Q: Rhyming
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0647  Q: Rhyming

The Sassenachs south of Hadrian's Wall have always seemed to have
appropriated the whole ruddy island. When Elizabeth was crowned at the
opening of the fifties, there were many households in Scotland bearing
celebratory shields proclaiming E I of Scotland and II of England. It
was still all but impossible to get a BBC job without a "London" accent,
and the successful Scots actors (Andrew Cruickshank, Duncan Macrae,
Alastair Sim etc.) either had to appear in Scots plays or amend their
modes of speech to be considered acceptable, ins spite of the fact that
greatly celebrated Sir Johnston Forbes-Robertson sported what the
English errob erroneously called a "brogue".

Unhappily, as can be seen form this posting, I learned typing on the
salt-edged North-East Scottish coast...

        Harry Hill

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joseph Tate <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Jun 1997 18:33:11 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 8.0647  Qs: Rhyming
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0647  Qs: Rhyming

Ron Dwelle writes:

> Looking at the rhyming in Othello (Iago to Desdemona, Brabantio & the
> Duke), I'm wondering if, in Shakespeare's day, this would have
> represented a typical kind of English discourse, an "elite" type of
> English discourse, or rather something that only the super subtle
> Venetians would engage in.

Rhyming, at least in Shakespeare's plays, was not limited to the
Venetians. Coriolanus speaks in heroic couplets in 2.3.113-124. Various
characters in *Henry V* end speeches with a series of heroic couplets:
King Henry in 1.2.307-310, again in 2.2.192-193, again in 3.3.42-43 and
57-58, etc.  Nearly the entire scene of 5.6 between King Henry,
Northumberland, Fitzwater, Percy and Exton of *Richard II* is in heroic
couplets. *Midsummer Night's Dream* is replete with couplets, abab
quatrains and other rhyme schemes. Romeo and Juliet exchange a rhymed
sonnet in 1.5. Hamlet ends his soliloquies in 2.2 and 4.4 with couplets.

The list goes on. Criticism has not been able to single out,
satisfactorily, a definitive character type that rhyme is limited to.
Much study has been done on the distinction between prose and verse in
the plays, but little seems to be around that concerns the distinction
between blank verse and couplets or rhymed verse, a distinction arguably
easier to perceive in performance.

I hope this is of some help...

Joseph Tate
U. of Washington

Re: MM Line; New Globe; Neutral; Pronunciation; Bad

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0646.  Monday, 9 June 1997.

[1]     From:   John Boni <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 6 Jun 1997 13:52:03 -0500 (CDT)
        0Subt:  Re: SHK 8.0643 Re: MM Line

[2]     From:   Peter Paul Schnierer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 6 Jun 1997 18:33:26 +0200 (MESZ)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0631 Re: New Globe Theatre

[3]     From:   Ron Ward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 8 Jun 1997 23:13:33 +1200 (NZST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0614  Re: Neutral Sh

[4]     From:   Tom Clayton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 6 Jun 1997 09:53:44
        Subj:   RE: SHK 8.0645  Q: Pronunciation of Cloten

[5]     From:   Ann Green <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 08 Jun 1997 09:04:29 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Fwd: SHK 8.0623  The Annual Bad Writing Contest


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Boni <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 6 Jun 1997 13:52:03 -0500 (CDT)
0Subject:       Re: SHK 8.0643 Re: MM Line

Dave Evett's reference to the RSC production of *MM* strikes a chord.
The play bears on issues of human fragility.  "Glassy" is among others
one of the images conveying that fragility.  Also, the sense of the
hazards of ice are referenced.  Since I am on the run, and working from
memory, I cannot continue with the catalogue.  However, one of the
several elements that brings the play nearer to what we regard as
tragedy is the serious sort of peripetia that undermines characters'
certainty about self, position, value system.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Paul Schnierer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 6 Jun 1997 18:33:26 +0200 (MESZ)
Subject: 8.0631 Re: New Globe Theatre
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0631 Re: New Globe Theatre

Terence Hawkes writes re the Globe Theatre:

> On its completion, the
> British government hastened to award its instigator the title of
> 'Commander of the British Empire'. I don't think he ever saw the joke.

It is a bit hard on Sam Wanamaker to accuse him of not seeing the joke.
After all, "on its completion" he'd been dead for a couple of years.

Cheers,
Peter

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Ward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 8 Jun 1997 23:13:33 +1200 (NZST)
Subject: 8.0614  Re: Neutral Sh
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0614  Re: Neutral Sh

>I also claim that an
>author has an intention, and that the intention is necessarily moral.

A comment on the above opinion may be helpful. It is unwise to presume
that an authors apparent neutrality is absolute. It may be just neutral
about judgements of the morality of others actions. "Judge not lest ye
be judged may be something some may actually practice. Others may think
that it can not be practiced. Not projecting either your own, or local
stereotypes of morality on to others may be a plug for compassion and
tolerance. That sounds a bit circular, but the difference is that
compassion and tolerance may be a way of life and nothing to do with any
formulated code ie moral codes are generalised rules needed for the
confused (which may be most of us). But like music the sound comes first
not the analysis.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Clayton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 6 Jun 1997 09:53:44
Subject: 8.0645  Q: Pronunciation of Cloten
Comment:        RE: SHK 8.0645  Q: Pronunciation of Cloten

This would be easier to respond to helpfully (or not at all) if one knew
what authorities were being drawn on for early pronunciation. In any
case, it would be helpful to many concerned if the International
Phonetic Alphabet were used to indicate the pronunciations.

Cheers,
Tom

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ann Green <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 08 Jun 1997 09:04:29 -0400
Subject: SHK 8.0623  The Annual Bad Writing Contest
Comment:        Re: Fwd: SHK 8.0623  The Annual Bad Writing Contest

YIKES!!

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