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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: February ::
Re: Mr. Magoo; Summer Program; Lamb/JC
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0161  Monday, 23 February 1998.

[1]     From:   John Walsh <
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        Date:   Thursday, 19 Feb 1998 11:05:09 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0152  Mr. Magoo and MND

[2]     From:   Harry Keyishian <
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        Date:   Thursday, 19 Feb 1998 17:45:15 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Summer Program in England: Wroxton College (nr Banbury)

[3]     From:   John Velz <
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        Date:   Sundayy, 22 Feb 1998 19:26:43 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: Your 3 February 1998 posting on "Julius Caesar"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Walsh <
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Date:           Thursday, 19 Feb 1998 11:05:09 -0500
Subject: 9.0152  Mr. Magoo and MND
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0152  Mr. Magoo and MND

>I was surprised and delighted last night to stumble across a Mr. Magoo
>feature film on the Disney channel last night, which concluded with *A
>Midsummer Night's Dream*.
(snip)
>Has anyone else seen this wonder?  I had been totally unaware of its
>existence.

Wasn't it great? I remember seeing that on TV when I was just a tyke,
and really enjoying it. It wasn't until high school, when I first read
MND, that I realized it wasn't an original story. (All right, I'm a
little slow.  But I'm cheerful.)

I was very glad that the characters didn't "yuck it up" for the sake of
a few laughs. It's every bit as satisfying as Mr. Magoo's Christmas
Carol, which is my favorite holiday film, ever.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Keyishian <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 19 Feb 1998 17:45:15 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Summer Program in England:  Wroxton College (nr Banbury)

        Summer Study in England:  Shakespeare at the Source

Wroxton College of Fairleigh Dickinson University, located 15 miles from
Stratford-upon-Avon, is offering an opportunity to study Shakespeare in
the lovely environment of a fully modernized Jacobean mansion, Wroxton
Abbey.  The four-week undergraduate and graduate sessions are conducted
by Dr. Pamela Mason, a fellow of the Shakespeare Institute.
Three-credit courses offered this summer (June 29-July 24) are:

        GRADUATE LEVEL:
        "This Rough Magic":  Explores the ways plays work in
        performance;  keyed to RSC performances at Stratford

        "I'll Mark the Play...":   A further exploration of the material
        covered in "This Rough Magic," including close textual study.

        UNDERGRADUATE LEVEL:
        Shakespeare on Page, Stage, and Screen:  An assessment of the
        different experiences offered by stage and screen performances.

        "All the World's a Stage":  (Co-requisite course):  An extension
        of "Shakespeare on Page, Stage, and Screen" offering further
        exploration of Elizabethan and Jacobean drama.

During the fall and spring semesters, Wroxton College also offers
courses in literature, history, political science, fine arts, economic,
business, sociology and education.   Graduate courses are also offered
for degree and non-degree students.

For more information and a prospectus, contact Seth Weisleder:

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
  or call (973) 443-8086

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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Date:           Sundayy, 22 Feb 1998 19:26:43 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Re: Your 3 February 1998 posting on "Julius Caesar"

With the concurrence of John Andrews I forward our correspondence about
the lamb passage in the quarrel scene of *JC* to Hardy so that the whole
list can see what we have said to each other about it.  Thanks for
patience in our delay in getting it to you.  JWV


From: John Velz to John Andrews:

John, I must confess that I'm rather surprised that you, and Gwynne
Evans, and apparently others, assume that Brutus must necessarily be
referring to himself as a lamb in the passage in question. I wouldn't
rule out that possibility by any means, but I think that the context
provides at least equal support for an inference that Brutus is
referring to the softer side of Cassius' own nature. Cassius has just
offered Brutus his "naked breast," after all, in a self-sacrificial
gesture that could well have suggested the sacramental symbolism that
the word "lamb" would have had for a Christian audience. What Brutus may
be saying, then, is that for all his vituperation, that part of
Cassius's personality that might suggest a ferocious wolf is yoked to
another part that proves, when challenged, to be as gentle as a lamb.


From: John Andrews to John Velz:

In my note on the passage in the Everyman paperback edition of the play,
I observe that, in characteristic fashion, though "Brutus is excusing
and forgiving Cassius' 'Anger' . . . he does so in a manner that demeans
Cassius' manhood." I suspect that the way one reads this exchange
depends in large measure on how one reads the relationship between these
two men in general. My own take on Brutus is that he holds the upper
hand throughout (to his own detriment as well as that of the weaker
Cassius), and that he is even more overbearing in this scene than he is
elsewhere in the play.


From John Velz to John Andrews:

Glad to have your note about JC 4.3.110; have passed it on to Joe
Candido for possible Variorum inclusion.  I cannot agree 1) that Cassius
could be described by Brutus as slow to anger (that same humor that his
mother gave him was choler, and he has a short fuse).  2) that anyone
could neglect the apologetic tone in Brutus' attempt here at
peacemaking.  O Cassius you are paired with a man who has a temper not
easily roused, but likely enough to blow at some point, afterwarding
returning to its normal quietude.  On the yoking of generals of
different temperaments, cf. Paul Jorgensen  *Sh's Military World*
passim.  J. argues that temperamental differences between military
officers is a favorite theme of Sh.'s political plays, and this passage
in 4.3. of JC is a clear instance.  We are not likely to agree about
this passage, but all is o.k. all the same.
 

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