1998

Call for Manuscripts

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0153  Wednesday, 18 February 1998.

From:           Mike LoMonico <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 18 Feb 1998 10:54:14 -0500
Subject:        Call for Manuscripts

Announcement and Call for Manuscripts:

Getting through a Shakespeare play can sometimes be a daunting task for
a teacher and a reluctant class.  Over the past fifteen years, many
excellent new approaches have surfaced in the United States, Canada, and
England.  However, finding these ideas and sorting through them can at
times be even more daunting.

In response to requests from our readers around the world, Shakespeare
Magazine launched its Teaching Resource section at
http://www.shakespearemag.com on Friday, February 13.  At present, this
section contains twenty carefully selected teaching ideas for various
plays, but the editors plan to add many more and make it the definitive
location for quality Shakespeare lessons.

Martha Harris and Sheri Maeda, both experienced teachers who have served
as Master Teachers at the Folger Library's Teaching Shakespeare
Institute, will serve as editors for this section.  They both have a
keen eye for what works and what is a quality lesson. They are presently
calling for submissions of  original lessons, teaching ideas, or
approaches.

All lessons, ideas, or questions should be sent to the editors at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Mr. Magoo and MND

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0152  Wednesday, 18 February 1998.

From:           Dale Lyles <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesdayy, 18 Feb 1998 10:29:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Mr. Magoo and MND

I was surprised and delighted last night to stumble across a Mr. Magoo
feature film on the Disney channel last night, which concluded with *A
Midsummer Night's Dream*.  Mr. Magoo played Puck, and the story was
amazingly intact, even including much original text as its dialog.

My impression was that, as animations go, it was not very funny, but
that may have been because my awareness of it was focused on comparing
it to the original as it progressed.  The producers didn't yuck it up
for yucks' sake; it was pretty much Shakespeare, only very streamlined.
My 9-year-old son, who played one of the forest's denizens in our
production last fall, constantly corrected their paraphrases and
marveled at the amount they left out; I explained that this was for
"little kids."

Has anyone else seen this wonder?  I had been totally unaware of its
existence.

Dale Lyles
Newnan Community Theatre Company
http://shenandoah.peachnet.edu/nctc/

Re: Anti-Semitism

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0150  Wednesday, 18 February 1998.

[1]     From:   Charles Weinstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 16 Feb 1998 10:45:20 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0133  Re: Anti-Semitism

[2]     From:   Sean Kevin Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 16 Feb 1998 10:27:33 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0145  Re: Anti-Semitism

[3]     From:   Stevie Simkin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 16 Feb 1998 22:23:41 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0145  Re: Anti-Semitism


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charles Weinstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 16 Feb 1998 10:45:20 -0500
Subject: 9.0133  Re: Anti-Semitism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0133  Re: Anti-Semitism

Although Wesker originally called his play The Merchant, he now calls it
Shylock.  His recently-published diary of the ill-starred Broadway
production explains all this and more. Its title is:  The Birth of
Shylock and the Death of Zero Mostel.  So far, it's available only in
England.  It's a damned good read.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Kevin Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 16 Feb 1998 10:27:33 -0800
Subject: 9.0145  Re: Anti-Semitism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0145  Re: Anti-Semitism

Dear all,

Larry Weiss's suggestion that the 'hath not a Jew eyes' speech might be
read ironically ties in with an idea I've been entertaining for a
while.  Has anyone seen Shylock played as a Nazi?  Of course, this is an
offensive reversal of victim and victimizer, but offensiveness isn't
always a bad thing in theatre, and such a production might also tend
towards making Shylock a bad man, rather than just an Elizabethan
stereotype.  In fact, it could call into question many of our own
stereotypes, both of Jews as victims and as Nazis as evil.  This isn't
to say that such a questioning will lead to political progressiveness,
but subversiveness and leftiness aren't as inseparable as some people
like to think.

The parallel could work fairly well, I think.  After all, Shylock is
embittered by his treatment at the hands of his peers, much like the
Germans were embittered at their treatment by Versailles, and unleashes
a holocaust of suffering all around by way of asserting himself.  The
victim becomes victimizer, in turn.  In fact, the themes of
victimization being passed on, or of reasonably likable people being
turned by their appropriation of their own treatment at the hands of
others into bloodthirsty monsters might offer some larger issues and
more genuinely productive self-reflection than the
Shakespeare-as-holocaust-film reading, in which MoV is just an object
lesson in the depravity of the past.

Cheers,
Sean Lawrence.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stevie Simkin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 16 Feb 1998 22:23:41 -0000
Subject: 9.0145  Re: Anti-Semitism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0145  Re: Anti-Semitism

Larry Weiss discusses  the "Hath not a Jew eyes" speech and concludes
that

"Shylock argues that Jews are human.  Solanio and Salerio (and the
audience) never  denied that.  Their point was that Shylock and other
Jews in Venice (and, by extension, all Jews) were inhumane, not
non-human.  (Shylock,  of course, confirms that point, at least to the
satisfaction of the  original audience.)  Viewed in this fashion, the
speech was intended to be funny and was probably received as such."

I have also felt uncomfortable about the standard reading of the speech
which takes it as a plea for tolerance, as a claim that Jews are just as
human as Christians. There are many ways the speech could be read,
perhaps, but when I saw the recent RSC production what struck me was the
conclusion of that speech ("will we not revenge") - if we see the speech
as culminating in this threat, it becomes NOT an attempt at justifying
not Jewish humanity, but rather a justification of the savage vengeance
he has in mind.  If you work backwards from the speech's climax, it is a
much less cosy speech.

I agree with Larry that we shouldn't give up studying the play on
account of its anti-Semitism.  And as I've said before, it's not as if
we can really "blame" Shakespeare for being anti-Semitic.  But the worst
thing we can do is try and claim for Shakespeare a PC-ness 400 years
ahead of his time and pretend the anti-Semitism isn't there at all.

Q: Religious Imagery in Measure for Measure

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0151  Wednesday, 18 February 1998.

From:           Karen E. Bruhn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 18 Feb 1998 08:43:51 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Religious Imagery in Measure for Measure

I'm revising and updating a seminar paper on religious imagery in MfM
into a chapter of my dissertation.  "The Shakespeare person" on my
committee is incommunicado (I'm in Religious Studies) and I need some
guidance on updating my bibliography.  I wrote the seminar paper in '93,
so I have the "classics" but would appreciate any advice/comments on
newer stuff.  I have every intention of doing an MLA search; that well
may be all I need.  I post this at the request of my advisor, who is a
worrywart.

Thanks in advance,
Karen Bruhn

Re: Shakespeare Study in England

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0149  Wednesday, 18 February 1998.

[1]     From:   Ted Nellen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 16 Feb 1998 11:20:56 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0143  Q: Shakespeare Study in England

[2]     From:   Franklin J. Hildy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 16 Feb 1998 14:27:43 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0143  Q: Shakespeare Study in England

[3]     From:   Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 16 Feb 1998 21:52:16 +0000
        Subj:   SHK 9.0143 Q: Shakespeare Study in England


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ted Nellen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 16 Feb 1998 11:20:56 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 9.0143  Q: Shakespeare Study in England
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0143  Q: Shakespeare Study in England

The Shakespeare Institute in Stratford is great.  Get a room and go.
Being in Stratford, hobnobbing, dropping in on lectures, using the
libraries there, seeing the theaters etc etc will be studying enough.
Just get a room in Stratford and go.

Good luck,
Ted

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Franklin J. Hildy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 16 Feb 1998 14:27:43 -0500
Subject: 9.0143  Q: Shakespeare Study in England
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0143  Q: Shakespeare Study in England

Yes, The Teaching Shakespeare Through Performance course at the
International Shakespeare Globe Center runs July 5-July 25 and it is
ideal for High School Teachers. Your local English Speaking Union offers
scholarships. Since you are in the eastern region, contact Jason
Rosenbaum at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 16 Feb 1998 21:52:16 +0000
Subject: Q: Shakespeare Study in England
Comment:        SHK 9.0143 Q: Shakespeare Study in England

In answer to request about Shakespeare study, try the Shakespeare
Institute in Stratford-on-Avon, an outreach for Birmingham University.
BUT they don't have accommodation facilities. Other than that, cheap
accommodation is sometimes available in Oxford in a college - worth
writing to the Assistant Secretary of St. John's College, Oxford. There
is a big vacation American study scheme at St. John's but taken by a
regular mission group. Nevertheless, they may know of a place. in which
case, you would then need to get relevant library tickets to get access
to the Bodleian, and Radcliffe Libraries. American university / college
supervisors can frequently arrange access through 'trade' links, worth a
try. If not, try London. Plenty of cheapish accommodation, decent study,
but horrendous travel. Swings and roundabouts, I guess.

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