1998

Re: Anti-Semitism

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0133  Friday, 13 February 1998.

[1]     From:   Roger Gross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Feb 1998 15:48:47 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0121  Re: Anti-Semitism

[2]     From:   David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 12 Feb 1998 11:56:28 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0121  Re: Anti-Semitism


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Gross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 11 Feb 1998 15:48:47 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 9.0121  Re: Anti-Semitism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0121  Re: Anti-Semitism

The Arnold Wesker Shylock play is titled THE MERCHANT, not SHYLOCK.  My
copy is a Penguin Books publication, WESKER, V. 4

There is also a 'school edition' with lots of commentary, historical
background, etc. and a Preface by Wesker, published by Methuen Student
Editions.

In his Preface, Wesker says: 'The Jew in Shakespeare's play is meant to
embody what he wishes to despise.  That he gives Shylock lines with
which to defend and explain himself has more to do with his dramatic
instinct for not making the opposition too black, which would lessen
credibility and impact, than it has to do with a wish to be kind to a
poor Jew....There is no evidence anywhere else that Shakespeare was
distressed by anti-Jewish feeling.  The portrayal of Shylock offends for
being a lie about the Jewish character...like Shylock, I'm unforgiving,
unforgiving of the play's contribution to the world's astigmatic view
and murderous hatred of the Jew.      I ceased finally to be a
'forgiver' when, in 1973, watching Laurence Olivier's oi-yoi-yoi
portrayal of Shylock in Jonathan Miller's production at The National
Theatre, I was struck by the play's irredeemable anti-semitism.  It was
not an intellectual evaluation but the immediate impact I actually
experienced..   Here was a play which, despite the poetic genius of its
author-or who knows, perhaps because of it!--could emerge as nothing
other than a confirmation of the Jew as bloodsucker.  Worse, the
so-called defence of Shylock-'If you prick him doth he not bleed'-was so
powerful that it dignified the anti-semitism.  An audience, it seemed to
me on that night, could come away with its prejudices about the Jew
confirmed but held with an easy conscience because they thought they'd
heard a noble plea for extenuating circumstances.'

This sounds right to me.

In his book of essays, DISTINCTIONS (Jonathan Cape, 1985), he includes
'Extracts from a New York Journal Kept During Rehearsals of THE
MERCHANT' and a piece called 'Why I fleshed out Shylock'.

THE MERCHANT is a very good 'antidote' or corrective to Shakespeare's
version of the Jew in Venice.


(Historical tidbit:  Zero Mostel was cast as Shylock in the American
production of THE MERCHANT but died on opening night of the out of town
tryout in Philadelphia, 8 Sept.,1977.)

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 12 Feb 1998 11:56:28 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 9.0121  Re: Anti-Semitism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0121  Re: Anti-Semitism

I am familiar with Halio's admirable edition of *The Merchant of Venice*
and I have some familiarity with the play's stage history.  I would be
grateful for responses to specifically theatrical questions.  How did
the recent R.S.C. production treat these-if at all?  How have other
productions you have seen or heard about treated them?

1. Shylock's speaks of being kicked and spat upon.  Ought the audience
to see Antonio or others kicking, spitting upon, or otherwise physically
abusing Shylock?  Is there such staging in some productions?  Is there
no such staging in others?

2. What do Salanio and Sararino do during the "hath not a Jew eyes?"
speech?  Do they listen respectfully?  Do they laugh and taunt the
speaker?

3. Is Jessica's running away with Lorenzo-staged perhaps as a
satyrnalian masque-a love-scene, an abduction, something between the
two?

4. How is Shylock's last exit staged.  "I am not well."  Is he on- or
offstage, or leacing slowly, or hurrying off, or pushed off, or walking
off with dignity, as Gratiano makes his speech about the "gallows not
the font?"

I'd be especially curious to know from Stevie Simpkin how these matters
were handled in the London production.

David Richman

Qs: Adriana in COE 2.1.101; Was Shakespeare a Catholic

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0132  Friday, 13 February 1998.

[1]     From:   Eric Armstrong <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Feb 1998 16:32:30 -0400
        Subj:   Adriana in COE 2.1.101

[2]     From:   David N. Beauregard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 12 Feb 1998 19:58:22 EST
        Subj:   Re: Was Shakespeare a Catholic?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eric Armstrong <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 11 Feb 1998 16:32:30 -0400
Subject:        Adriana in COE 2.1.101

        But, too unruly deer, he breaks the pale,
        And feeds from home; poor I am but his stale.

When working with an actor on this speech, we looked for information on
the word "stale". The word is glossed in most places as "a dupe" or
"laughing stock" and this is what Schmidt suggests. However, when we
read other uses of "stale" in Schmidt, I found that I liked version 3
best - "that which has become vapid and tasteless, or is worn out by use
(Err.II,  1, 101?); hence almost equivalent to a prostitute:" I also
liked Schmidt's quibble on deer=dear.

My question is why the "dupe" theory? Stale links to the metaphor of
"feeding", doesn't it? I can see that being worn out with use, treated
like a prostitute,  might then make you feel like a dupe, but isn't that
reaching? Am I missing something etymological here?

eric

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David N. Beauregard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 12 Feb 1998 19:58:22 EST
Subject:        Re: Was Shakespeare a Catholic?

I'm very late to this discussion, but I would like to point out that the
late 17th C tradition coming from Richard Davies that Shakespeare "dyed
a papist" is confirmed by Prospero's Epilogue in The Tempest. Prospero's
request for intercessory prayers in view of his eventual death concludes
with the lines "As you from crimes would pardoned be,/Let your
indulgence set me free." In view of the preceding lines having to do
with prayer, the play on the word "indulgence" almost forces a
theological reading. Moreover, the overall dramatic "posture" of
Prospero is distinctly Roman Catholic in that we have a figure facing
death "working" out his salvation in fear and trembling (not calm
faith), asking for intercessory prayers (not simply God's mercy), and
conceiving of prayer from others as "relieving" him from despair (aka
the doctrine of "works"). Compare the Council of Trent with the Homilies
(Exhortation vs. the feare of death). For the complete argument, with
fuller evidence, see my article "New Light on Shakespeare's Catholicism:
Prospero's Epilogue in The Tempest" in Renascence 2.3 (Spring 1997). If
anyone can convincingly answer my argument, or even offer a
counter-argument, I would be greatly interested.

David N. Beauregard

Announcements

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0130  Wednesday, 11 February 1998.

[1]     From:   Mike LoMonico <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesdayy, 10 Feb 1998 21:38:36 -0500
        Subj:   Shakespeare Magazine

[2]     From:   Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Feb 1998 09:29:41 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   New web site: "Cultural Readings"

[3]     From:   Norm Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Feb 98 14:21:12 EST
        Subj:   Please pass along this announcement


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike LoMonico <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesdayy, 10 Feb 1998 21:38:36 -0500
Subject:        Shakespeare Magazine

SHAKESPEARE MAGAZINE announces the publication of volume two, issue
one-the winter 1998 issue.  In its pages readers will find several
classroom exercises to help students to find solid ground amid the
swirling sea of Shakespeare's language, Jeffrey McQuain's article about
the more than 1500 words Shakespeare coined, an interview with Patrick
Doyle-the composer for Kenneth Branagh's Shakespeare movies, a feature
on Shakespeare and Company's famous education program, strategies for
how to teach the sonnets, an excerpt from Rex Gibson's new book of
language exercises, and the usual roundup of information about
Shakespeare productions, books, and conferences.

For subscribers who are counting the days-the magazine left the
mailhouse today via bulk mail.  With luck, you will get it in a few
weeks.  For more details about this issue or to subscribe, go to
http://www.shakespearemag.com or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Mike LoMonico
Nancy Goodwin
editors

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 11 Feb 1998 09:29:41 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        New web site: "Cultural Readings"

--PLEASE EXCUSE MULTIPLE POSTINGS; PLEASE CIRCULATE--

                ANNOUNCING A NEW ON LINE EXHIBITION

    "CULTURAL READINGS: COLONIZATION AND PRINT IN THE AMERICAS"

 http://www.library.upenn.edu/special/gallery/kislak/index/cultural.html

This collaborative web site presents and interprets a wide variety of
texts-books, manuscripts, illustrations, maps, and artifacts-generated
by Europe's colonization of the Americas. Comparative and broad in
scope, the exhibition investigates Spanish, French, English, and Dutch
"readings" of the New World and the "readings" of Europeans made by many
Native cultures.

Topics covered include the literature of colonial promotion; printed
images of Natives; Native responses to print; missionary activities;
Indian languages; the geographies of the New World; and captivity
narratives.  The web site also contains essays by Louise Burkhart,
Sabine MacCormack, Michael Ryan, Daniel Slive, and Karim Tiro;
bibliography; and web links.

Materials shown in "Cultural Readings" are drawn from the collections of
the Jay I. Kislak Foundation; the Rosenbach Museum & Library; the
University of Pennsylvania's Department of Special Collections; and the
University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norm Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 11 Feb 98 14:21:12 EST
Subject:        Please pass along this announcement

From: Louie Crew <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

I have compiled an E-Mail Directory of Lesbigay Scholars, listing over
700.  To be included, fill out the form below and return it to me:

              This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Do NOT send by snail mail.

Be sure that you have 1+ meg of free space to receive the full
directory. It will arrive in 7 or more messages.

Note:  All are welcome.

The E-Directory helps lesbigay and transgendered scholars connect
regarding on-going manuscripts, conferences, and other scholarly
projects.   I send the Directory to all who agree to be listed, with
periodic updates.

This is not a discussion list but rather, a resource list.

Please share this announcement with any friends who might be interested
and with any other e-networks where forthright lesbigay or transgendered
scholars might assemble qua scholars.

Also:  please freely visit the e-directory's web pages, where
approximately 40% of those listed in the total directory have agreed to
be listed publicly:

     http://newark.rutgers.edu/~lcrew/lbg_edir.html

I also post to that site announcements of interest to lesbigay scholars
everywhere.  Please send me by private mail any material which you would
like for me to put there.

Thank you.
Louie Crew
Associate Professor, English Department, Rutgers University/Newark
Chair of the Rutgers University Senate, Member Board of Governors
Author/editor of _The Gay Academic_ and 1,200+ others
Co-founder of the Lesbigay Caucus of the National Council of Teachers of
English
Founder of Integrity, the lesbigay justice ministry of the Episcopal
Church
Member of the Episcopal House of Deputies
Member of the Episcopal Church Commission on Anglican and International
Peace with Justice Concerns
Member of the Standing Committee of the  Diocese of Newark
(Snail mail:   P. O. Box 30, Newark, NJ 07101)

=============================================================

                 Entry Form for E-Directory of Lesbigay Scholars

Name:

Institutional affiliation:
       Department:
       Position:
E-mail address(es):
My www homepage:
Snail mail:
Phone(s)
FAX:

Here, ranked in order of preference, are up to four keywords to name my
scholarly area, e.g.  historyenglish linguistics heteroStudies
politicalscience englishliterature

1st:
2nd:
3rd:
4th:

Citations of a sample of yr. previous lesbigay scholarly projects:

List/description of yr. on-going lesbigay scholarly projects:

Indicate your preference: I understand that the directory itself goes
only to listed persons.  Other persons listed in this directory

   ___DO      have my permission to share my entry with others for
scholarly purposes,

              and if they do, they may share my entry

  (Note:  If you say yes to the next blank, you are presumed to be
giving me permission to include your entry among those published in the
www version of the e-directory, available for all the world to see.)

              ___at their discretion.

              ___only if they query me first.

   ___DO NOT  have my permission to share my entry.

Re: Riverside JC

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0131  Friday, 13 February 1998.

[1]     From:   Albert Misseldine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Feb 1998 15:01:13 -0500
        Subj:   Riverside Changes

[2]     From:   John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Feb 1998 16:10:41 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Riverside JC


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Albert Misseldine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 11 Feb 1998 15:01:13 -0500
Subject:        Riverside Changes

Larry Weiss asks about other amendments in the Riverside Shakespeare. In
the 1974 edition , intro to JC (p.1103, first column) we read "For
Plutarch, Caesar is already virtually a king, and Brutus'  an act of
deposition; it is not so for Shakespeare, who does not even mention that
Caesar, if he got it, was to wear the crown only outside Italy."

I, and a few thousand others I expect, wrote to Riverside and pointed
out I,iii,87-88. I noticed in a subsequent edition that this error was
corrected, but I don't have the later eds, so can't quote.

And may I add to this message my heartfelt thanks for all who responded
to my plea for help in producing JC. What a wonderful network this is.

Cheers, Albert Misseldine

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 11 Feb 1998 16:10:41 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Riverside JC

>Evans also pointed out the following changes to the footnotes:
>T/S,IV.ii.157; M/M,I.ii.129 & IV.i.1-6.  Nothing about JC,IV.iii.110.

Thus Larry Weiss.  But the copy of Riverside 1974 that I own reads
"yoked with: like".  It may have been the first printing of the 1974
edn. No indication of any rpt. involved on copyright page in my copy.  I
wrote the date "1974" and my signature on its flyleaf when I bought it,
so it came to me in that first year.  G. B. Evans may have forgotten
this change in footnote, or more likely he emended it long before the
1997 edn was dreamed of and the emendation of the note appeared in all
the rpts. that followed.  Until Bevington's later edns, 1980 amd 1992
appeared, RIV (-EVNS) was the edn. most often cited by U.S. scholars as
their textual authority-what Peter Alexander's (noteless) text pubd. by
Collins was in the Br. Isles.  I have no idea how many printings RIV
went through, but it must have been many.  Evans prob. didn't even
remember what had once been said about Cassius in the original note when
he compiled his list of textual and commentary note variants for you.

This, incidentally, may be the first time in all the years I have been
writing my name and date or putting a bookplate in newly purchased Sh.
books that it turns out to be useful.  (Wry smile.)

I sent John Andrews a reply to a private note he sent me about my
preference for the lamb as Brutus' vision of himself.  If he agrees to
share his view with the listserv, either he or I could forward our
correspondence to all.  A good idea, I think, because he argues the
matter strongly and cites his *Everyman's Sh.* notes on the alleged
crux.

A kindly older scholar once said we should all be part bloodhounds.
Smelling out and explaining strange things in texts is a delightful way
to spend one's life.

Yours, Larry, with admiration,
John Velz

MLA Teaching *Hamlet* Questionnaire

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0129  Wednesday, 11 February 1998.

From:           Bernice W. Kliman  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 10 Feb 1998 21:35:02 -0500
Subject:        MLA Teaching *Hamlet* Questionnaire


[Editor's Note: Please send responses directly to Bernice W. Kliman at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. -HMC]

Dear SHAKSPERians,

Re: Approaches to Teaching Hamlet, ed. Bernice W. Kliman.

For the above volume in their Approaches to Teaching series, MLA has
sent questionnaires to about 250 randomly selected members who indicated
Shakespeare as one of their interests. For those who received that
notice, or for others who would like to write about teaching Hamlet, I
am appending the questionnaire so that you can download it, respond to
it, and send it via the Internet. Respondents are acknowledged in the
text. Please include your resume if you would like to write an essay for
the collection. In addition to the volume's overview (developed from the
answers to the questionnaire) and the essays (selected from among those
proposed), I hope to include a section called "short takes"-brief
descriptions of techniques and strategies that work.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Questionnaire for Approaches to Teaching HAMLET

Name _______________      Department _______________

School ______________      Address __________________

Phone(s) _____________     Fax ______________________

E-mail _______________

Please feel free to use as much space for your response as you need,
keying your answers to the questions below. I would be most grateful to
receive supplementary materials (course descriptions, syllabi,
bibliographies, and study materials, including assignments. In the
published volume, I will acknowledge all respondents. Thank you.

Please describe the course(s) in which you teach Hamlet. Please indicate
the level of the course (high school, including grade level;
undergraduate, general survey, upper division; graduate; or mixed).
Indicate the time you allot to this play (number of sessions or hours or
percentage of total course time).  Is there anything about your
particular institution or teaching assignments that makes teaching
especially challenging?

1.  In your teaching of Hamlet, do you relate parts (or all) to other
Shakespeare plays? If so, identify them and describe the relationships.

2.  Do you relate Hamlet to works by writers/ artists other than
Shakespeare? Describe the relationships.

3.  For Hamlet, which editions, anthologies, textbooks, or books do you
use
in the classroom and why?  Which editions do you use for your own study
and
why? Do you incorporate textual studies in your teaching? How?

4.  Which reference works and critical works would you recommend to
teachers of this play? What are the indispensable texts for the
teacher's library? Why?

5.  Which reference or critical works do you recommend (or assign) to
students? Why?

6.  What sorts of assignments (classroom, group, written, oral, library
or Internet research) do you require your students to complete in this
play? Have any proven particularly successful? unsuccessful?  How do you
design assignments to avoid plagiarism and to give students
opportunities for learning independently.

7.  What is the relation, if any,  between your own scholarly work and
your teaching?

8.  What features of Hamlet do your students find most engaging  or
stimulating?  most difficult or challenging? How do you meet and exploit
these challenges?

9.   What do you consider the most important features of Hamlet for your
students to understand? Have recent changes in the make-up of your
clientele affected your pedagogy? How?

10.  How do you deal with such matters as rhetorical tropes,
versification and language overall?

11.  Which critical approaches or theoretical issues have you found most
helpful or stimulating in teaching the play? Please indicate why you
find them helpful.

12. Do you incorporate performance in your teaching of Hamlet? How so?

13.  Do you integrate the following into your teaching on Hamlet: (1)
Q1, Q2, or F1 facsimiles; (2) Renaissance cultural studies; (3)
twentieth-century cultural studies; (4) Aristotelian and other analyses
of tragedy; (5) New Criticism; (6) Old or New Historicism, including
source studies; (7) gender studies; (8) queer studies; (9) Marxist or
materialist
studies; (10) psychoanalytic; (10) other. If so, please specify and
describe how you use these in teaching.

14.  Identify audio-visual materials (especially video) useful in
teaching Hamlet. Do you use illustrations? audio recordings? What is
your source of material (1) private library, (2) school or public
library, (3) other.  What amount of class time do you use for
audio-visual materials?  Do you use CD-ROMs or other technologically
sophisticated materials? How to you use any or all of these materials?

15.  Do you make use of e-mail, the Internet, or other electronic
technology in your teaching? Describe.

16.  Are there any other issues in teaching Hamlet you would like to
address? Please do so.

If you would be interested in contributing an essay to the proposed
volume, please indicate what your topic might be, your theoretical or
critical orientation, and a clear statement about how you would make
your topic immediately useful to teachers. Please include a current
curriculum vitae.

Please return by 30  April 1998 to Bernice W. Kliman, 70 Glen Cove
Drive, Glen Head, NY 11545 or via e-mail to klimanb40sunynassau.edu.

Bernice W. Kliman
70 Glen Cove Drive
Glen Head, NY 11545
516-671-1301 (h)
516-572-7185 (o)
516-759-5978 (f)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.