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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: January ::
Three Questions
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0033  Thursday, 8 January 1998.

[1]     From:   Mary Jane Miller <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Jan 1998 13:05:45 -0500
        Subj:   Two Unrelated Qs

[2]     From:   John Cox <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 07 Jan 1998 13:09:07 -0500
        Subj:   Measure for Measure and Luther


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Jane Miller <
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Date:           Wednesday, 7 Jan 1998 13:05:45 -0500
Subject:        Two Unrelated Qs

Having finally seen (out of season) the new Globe this Christmas, as far
as I could make out from walking around the lower gallery and the pit no
scene could be fully staged in the 'within' . A scene could begin there
but the sightlines are really dreadful and I assume the scene would have
to move out onto the stage quite quickly - or am I missing something
which seeing a performance would demonstrate?

Has there been any discussion on the list about Bates' new book on
Shakespeare's Genius?

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Cox <
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Date:           Wednesday, 07 Jan 1998 13:09:07 -0500
Subject:        Measure for Measure and Luther

I was reading Luther yesterday and came across this "analogue" (to use
Geoffrey Bullough's term) of *Measure for Measure*:

There is a story told of Duke Charles of Burgundy.  A nobleman captured
his enemy.  The wife of the captive came to ransom him.  The nobleman
said he would give the man back to her if she slept with him.  The woman
was virtuous, but wanted her husband released, and so she went and asked
her husband whether she should do it to get him freed.  The man wanted
to be free and to save his life, and permitted it.  But the day after
the nobleman had slept with the woman, he had her husband beheaded, and
gave him back to her dead.  The woman complained of this to Duke Charles
who summoned the nobleman and order to take the woman as his wife.
After the wedding day, he had the man beheaded, placed the woman in
possession of his goods and restored her honour.

Bullough does not include this story in *Narrative and Dramatic Source*,
though he does include one from St. Augustine that bears some
similarities to Luther's story.  I don't have time at the moment to
check other lists of sources (I read the Luther while preparing for a
class).  Does anyone know if this analogue has been noticed before?

John Cox
Hope College
 

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