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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: January ::
Qs: End of 16th C; Maps; Calvinism; Teaching Advice
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0046  Monday, 12 January 1998.

[1]     From:   Mark Morton <
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        Date:   Saturday, 10 Jan 1998 19:03:44 -0600
        Subj:   The end of the sixteenth century

[2]     From:   Charlie Mitchell <
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        Date:   Saturday, 10 Jan 1998 09:27:10 -0800
        Subj:   The failure of maps

[3]     From:   Heidi Sue Webb <
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        Date:   Friday, 9 Jan 1998 17:26:52 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Tragedies & Calvinism

[4]     From:   Tery Taylor <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 Jan 1998 11:24:05 +0200 (EET)
        Subj:   Advice on Teaching


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mark Morton <
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Date:           Saturday, 10 Jan 1998 19:03:44 -0600
Subject:        The end of the sixteenth century

Hello-I'm curious about what Shakespeare and his contemporaries thought
about the turn of their century. That is, did the last day of the
sixteenth century, or the first day of the seventeenth, prompt any
Elizabethans to remark upon that "century transition"-to write a poem
about it, to note it in their diary, etc?  It seems obvious that the end
of our own century is going to be met with tremendous hoopla, but I
don't recall encountering any Elizabethan texts that even allude to the
end of their century as something worthy, in itself, of being noticed.
Am I correct, also, in thinking that for them the last day of the
century would be March 31, not December 31? And did they consider the
last year of their century to be 1599 (as most people living now will
celebrate 1999 as the last year of this century) or did they consider
the last year of their century to be 1600 (as the Victorians considered
1900 to be the last year of the nineteenth century). Any thoughts on
this matter, or suggestions for Elizabethan texts that might be
pertinent?

Mark Morton

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charlie Mitchell <
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Date:           Saturday, 10 Jan 1998 09:27:10 -0800
Subject:        The failure of maps

Does anyone know of a good, detailed map of Elizabethan/Jacobean
London?  Not a panoramic view or a sketchy map showing the theatres but
a map that names streets, liberties, and major landmarks?  Surprisingly,
I'm finding it difficult to locate.  Any leads would be greatly
appreciated.

Cheers.
Charlie Mitchell

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Heidi Sue Webb <
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Date:           Friday, 9 Jan 1998 17:26:52 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Tragedies & Calvinism

I would be interested to know if anyone on the list shares an interest
in Calvinism (particularly the issues of merit and natural law) as it
pertains to the big guy's tragedies.  Two essays from _Shakespeare
Studies_ vol. 20, 1987, by Michael Keefer and John Stachniewski, are
very worthwhile, but I disagree with their claims that we've got a
theologically mainstream playwright in W.S.

Responses off list are welcome.

Cheers,
Heidi

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P.S.  I think it would be great if I had enough knowledge and skill to
be accused of the malevolence (translate: academic success) worthy of
being threatened to be kicked off the list.

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tery Taylor <
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Date:           Monday, 12 Jan 1998 11:24:05 +0200 (EET)
Subject:        Advice on Teaching

I am teaching in a University English department in Turkey.  I have been
teaching drama for the past semester and next semester I will start my
Shakespeare courses.  I would first of all like to ask the advice of all
you, who have taught this before.

My students are not native speakers of English and I expect many
comprehension difficulties for my students.  They are eager for the
class, but I am concerned that they will not understand and I want to
help them appreciate not only the stories, but also the style.  I have
planned to let them read the Lambs' collection of stories since it
better than cliff notes, but I am not sure how to approach my subject,
and any advice you could give me would be greatly appreciated.  (please
forgive my misspellings - Turkish keyboard)

Thanks in advance

Teri Taylor
Erciyes University
Kayseri, Turkey

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