Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: January ::
Re: TN; Teaching; End of C; Price; Opera; McKellen
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0055  Friday, 16 January 1998.

[1]     From:   Bruce Fenton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jan 1998 07:49:36 EST
        Subj:   Review:  St. Augustine "Twelfth Night"

[2]     From:   Ron Dwelle <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jan 1998 08:22:46 -0500
        Subj:   Handling the "language problem"

[3]     From:   Peter Nockolds <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jan 1998 13:27:35 GMT
        Subj:   Re  End of 16th C

[4]     From:   Mark A Singer <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 15 Jan 1998 16:29:15 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.005  Qs: Price Check

[5]     From:   Barbara Silverstein <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 15 Jan 1998 11:00:37 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0051 Opera Version of Hamlet

[6]     From:   Mark Webster <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jan 1998 17:47:06 -0600
        Subj:   McKellen spelling

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bruce Fenton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jan 1998 07:49:36 EST
Subject:        Review:  St. Augustine "Twelfth Night"

I saw a production of "Twelfth Night" in St. Augustine Florida this
weekend.  The play was very well done- especially the second half (the
first half did drag a little at times)- overall funny and worthwhile.
There were some minor language changes but I believe the play was
presented in its entirety.  The theater is an outdoor amphitheater (with
fine Florida weather) and the production is every Sunday at 2pm for the
next couple of months, the cost is free (donations appreciated).  The
players perform a different play each quarter - I believe it is year
-round.  I am not sure of the name of the theater or   players but it is
right on the main Route on Anastasia Island.  It should be very easy to
find if you are going to be on vacation in Florida-the plays seem to be
very popular locally information should be available at many local
tourist info centers or by calling the Chamber of Commerce or the
English Department at Flaggler College (I would guess that they'd know).

Good luck,
Have Fun

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Dwelle <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jan 1998 08:22:46 -0500
Subject:        Handling the "language problem"

Following is an exercise I use frequently in my undergraduate
Shakespeare classes. It seems to work. (The text is from a hand-out that
I distribute at the beginning of each semester.)

Copy / Comment

One of the regular writing exercises we will do is a "Copy/Comment" on
assigned readings. This is a traditional writing exercise that has been
used for centuries, by advanced students learning how to write well-it
is similar to the method that Shakespeare used as a student.

You should follow a specific procedure.

1. As you read through the assigned work, keep an eye out for passages
that seem "interesting" to you (for whatever reason). Occasionally, I
will assign a certain aspect-such as "choose a passage related to a
major theme of the play" or "choose a passage that characterizes a major
character in the play."

2. Set aside a time adequate to do the exercise without interruption.
Depending on the length of the passage and your speed as a reader, 30 to
40 minutes will usually be ample.

3. Re-read the passage, as you normally would.

4. As soon as you're done, reflect for a moment and ask yourself what
was "most memorable" about the passage.

5. On a blank sheet of paper, copy the key passage--about one
handwritten page. You should do this in handwriting (not on the
computer). Your goal should be to copy the passage exactly, noting all
details, including word choice, sentence length, even punctuation.

6. As soon as you're done copying the key passage, write a brief comment
on it. You should feel free to comment on anything that comes to mind.
You will most likely focus first on the subject matter or content, but
in addition you should try to comment a little bit about the way the
passage was written. This comment part can be either handwritten or
typed into the computer.

7. Bring a copy of every copy/comment to class. They will often be the
beginning of discussion.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Nockolds <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jan 1998 13:27:35 GMT
Subject:        Re  End of 16th C

The end of the century may not have mattered so much to the Elizabethans
as there seems to have been a widespread belief that a new era would
begin with the Jupiter-Saturn conjunction of December 1603.  Such
conjunctions, which fall at 20 year intervals, move through the four
elements of the zodiac on a 795 year cycle and that of 1603 fell in a
fire sign, marking the beginning of a new such cycle.  There's a fair
amount of documentation for this. Given that the conjunction fell in the
year that Elizabeth died this must have contributed to the sense of a
new beginning with the accession of James.

At the end of September (Old Style) 1604 Mars, Jupiter and Saturn were
all bunched within seven degrees where a bright New Star appeared
between them.  The impact of this New Star on the consciousness of the
early 17th Century is worthy of a major study (We may still catch echoes
in the later works of Milton.)

The Jupiter-Saturn conjunction fell in the sign of Sagittarius near the
bright star Antares and there appears to be word-play on the event in
Othello 1, 3

Othello                 Send for the Lady to the Sagittary
                        . . . . . . . . . . . . .
                                        Of antars vast...
                        ...it was my hint to speake
                                .  . . . . . . . . . . . .
Iago                    Let us be coniunctive in our revenge

                                             lines 116, 140 & 142, 374-5
(Globe edition)

Peter Nockolds

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mark A Singer <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 15 Jan 1998 16:29:15 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 9.005  Qs: Price Check
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.005  Qs: Price Check

I just returned from the Folger Library with catalogues to current and
past exhibitions. The one concerning first Folios and the Folger
collection is fascinating, and answers your question about early 16th
century pricing (more complex than one might imagine).

Let me know if you want more specifics, otherwise call the Folger to
order it (about $ 11).

Mark Singer, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Barbara Silverstein <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 15 Jan 1998 11:00:37 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 9.0051 Opera Version of Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0051 Opera Version of Hamlet

This might be tough, because Thomas' opera does not get performed very
often.  However, your best bet might be to contact Opera America, the
professional service organization for producing companies.  They would
know about commercial recordings, but they may also be able to direct
you to a serviceable tape available through a member company.  According
to my (somewhat out-of-date) sources, the general e-mail address there
is 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Ask to have your message forwarded to someone in the Information Service
Department.  Normally, they provide data only for members, but since
your purposes are educational, and Opera America promotes activities
that might serve to introduce more people to opera, they may be willing
to help.  Do emphasize that your interest is educational/academic,
however.

Good luck!
Barbara Silverstein

[6]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mark Webster <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jan 1998 17:47:06 -0600
Subject:        McKellen spelling

I apologize in advance for being such an insufferable pedant, but I
can't help myself.  I have too often seen Sir Ian McKellen's name
misspelled in forums where accuracy should be more important, most
egregiously in a recent promotional advertisement for the film
*Restoration*.  To set the record straight, his last name does not
contain an *a* and is spelled McKellen (two *e*s).  I think he has
reached a sufficient stature in the acting community that we can get his
name right.

I realize that there are more burning issues for the list to consider,
but I just had to get this off my chest.  Maybe I should cut down on the
caffeine (or is it caffeine?)...

Mark Webster
Univ. of Texas

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.