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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: January ::
Re: Modern Adaptations
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0064  Tuesday, 20 January 1998.

[1]     From:   Gerda Grice <
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        Date:   Monday, 19 Jan 1998 11:40:23 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0059 Re: Modern Adaptations

[2]     From:   Tanya Gough <
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        Date:   Monday, 19 Jan 1998 12:03:04 -0500
        Subj:   Shakespeare on Film

[3]     From:   Hugh Howard Davis <
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        Date:   Monday, 19 Jan 1998 13:49:48 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0059  Re: Modern Adaptations

[4]     From:   David Small <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 20 Jan 1998 11:36:51 -0500
        Subj:   Books on Shakespearean films


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gerda Grice <
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Date:           Monday, 19 Jan 1998 11:40:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 9.0059 Re: Modern Adaptations
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0059 Re: Modern Adaptations

Has anyone mentioned Maxwell Anderson's play _Winterset_ (1935)?  It is
an adaptation of _Romeo and Juliet_.

Gerda Grice
Ryerson Polytech University
Toronto, Canada

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <
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Date:           Monday, 19 Jan 1998 12:03:04 -0500
Subject:        Shakespeare on Film

Yes, yes, here I am.  A few notes on the Shax film titles flying about:

Kurosawa's brilliant (and I might add, on my all-time personal top 5) is
sadly out of print.  They just re-released a bunch of Kurosawa titles,
but Ran was not among them.  Send an e-mail to me at 
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  if
you want this title released NOW.  (Don't mail to the list - Hardy hates
sorting my mail.)

Hugh asked about Jarman's _Tempest_ .  It's not available through any of
my channels, so perhaps one of you would be so kind as to lend it to
him.

Of the Richard Nathan list, the plays "Boys from Syracuse" and "Your Own
Thing" are not currently available.  Kiss Me Kate is, and West Side
Story just became available again.

If anyone knows of a print of Joe Macbeth for sale, please let me know.
A Thousand Acres is still high price, and I have not been able to trace
either Catch My Soul or Jubal.  Our Relations is also not available
right now.

By the way, Gus Van Sant's My Own Private Idaho is in fact based on HIV
parts 1 and 2, but the influence is actually via Orson Welles' Chimes at
Midnight.  The entire section of the Van Sant film became infinitely
more palatable for me once I figured that out.

Hope that helps.

Tanya Gough

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[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hugh Howard Davis <
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Date:           Monday, 19 Jan 1998 13:49:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 9.0059  Re: Modern Adaptations
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0059  Re: Modern Adaptations

On the subject of adaptations, I have read Richard Nathan's vaudevillian
Shakespearian turns, and they are quite enjoyable.  I don't know how
they read for those less acquainted with the particular acts/schtick of
the comedians (and, as such, how performances would go), but, as a fan
of old time performers, I thought Mr. Nathan did an expert job.  I look
forward to "Abbot and Costello meet MacDuff."  These are highly
recommended to all.

Hugh Davis

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Small <
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Date:           Tuesday, 20 Jan 1998 11:36:51 -0500
Subject:        Books on Shakespearean films

With the recent postings about Shakespearean films and modern
adaptations, I thought I would refer people to a few of the books I have
on the subject.

WALKING SHADOWS: SHAKESPEARE IN THE NATIONAL FILM AND TELEVISION
ARCHIVE.  Edited by Luke McKernan and Olwen Terris.  Published by the
British Film Institute.  ISBN 0-85170-486-7.   As its title implies, its
a directory of Shakespearean films in the National Archives, including
adaptations like Throne of Blood.  The collection is so extensive, it
even includes non-Shakespearean films that incorporate Shakespearean
elements.  Each listing comes with a mini review.

FILMING SHAKESPEARE'S PLAYS by Anthony Davies.  Cambridge University
Press.  ISBN 0-521-39913-0.  Mr. Davies reviews the films of Welles,
Olivier, Kurosawa, and others, with particular attention to
cinematography and set design.

SHAKESPEARE AND THE MOVING IMAGE edited by Anthony Davies and Stanley
Wells.  Cambridge University Press.  ISBN 0-521-43573-0.  A collection
of essays.

SHAKESPEARE THE MOVIE edited by Lynda E. Boose and Richard Burt.
Routledge [Books]  ISBN 0-45-16585-7.  Also a collection of essays.

These are all thought-provoking books, well worth adding to your
Shakespeare libraries.

Also of interest are the published screenplays of Ian Mckellen's RICHARD
III and Branaugh's HAMLET, HENRY V (just published), and MUCH ADO ABOUT
NOTHING.  Regardless of what you may have thought about any of these
films, if you are struggling with adapting Shakespeare for the screen
(as I am), they are veritable gold mines, with notes and diaries from
the productions.

Regards to all,
David Small

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