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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: January ::
Qs: Lear & Arthur; Julius Caesar
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0091  Friday, 30 January 1998.

[1]     From:   Andrew Mathis <
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        Date:   Thursday, 29 Jan 1998 23:33:25 -0800
        Subj:   Lear & Arthur

[2]     From:   Albert Misseldine <
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        Date:   Friday, 30 Jan 1998 10:40:35 -0500
        Subj:   Julius Caesar, general and specific


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Mathis <
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Date:           Thursday, 29 Jan 1998 23:33:25 -0800
Subject:        Lear & Arthur

Hello group:

I attended a lecture given by Prof. Harold Bloom a few years ago wherein
he spoke about the use of tropes by Lear that can also be found in the
Wisdom of Solomon, an intertestamental, Apocryphal book purportedly
written by Solomon (and still in the Douay Catholic canon).
Unfortunately, for the life of me, I can find neither my notes nor the
tropes themselves. I do remember that the references to Wisdom are in
Act IV somewhere. Anyone out there have a lead? Prof. Bloom's mailbox at
Yale is full, and he's not here at NYU this semester.

 Thanks in advance.

 Andrew Mathis
 http://pages.nyu.edu/~aem0608

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Albert Misseldine <
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Date:           Friday, 30 Jan 1998 10:40:35 -0500
Subject:        Julius Caesar, general and specific

Two questions, one general, one specific.

General: we are putting on JC this spring at our college, the director
wants to do it in modern (30's) dress, and we would welcome any hints,
suggestions, pitfalls to avoid, etc. We have noticed that there seems to
be no heroes here - and lots of BS. Even Antony's last speech, 'noblest
Roman' is hard (isn't it?) to take seriously, after all the
self-important and stupid things Brutus has done.

Specific: Riverside ed. has an unusual gloss on a line of Brutus in the
quarrel scene. I always thought "O Cassius, you are yoked with a lamb"
meant Brutus was likening himself to a lamb - slow to anger, etc. But
Riverside says 'yoked with' means 'like' - so Brutus is comparing
Cassius to a lamb, not himself. Any comments?
 

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