1998

Re: Postmodernism; RSC at BAM

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0072  Friday, 23 January 1998.

[1]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 22 Jan 1998 09:38:41 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Postmodernism

[2]     From:   Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 Jan 1998 09:37:19 -0500
        Subj:   RSC in NYC


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 22 Jan 1998 09:38:41 -0500
Subject:        Re: Postmodernism

The spectacle of Bill Godshalk rummaging through my old book reviews
offers more than a hint of desperation. Poor soul. Can the next
Cincinnatti Shakespeare Festival already be so barren of ideas?
Meanwhile, the silliness of  Robin Headlam-Wells's suggestion that I
might somehow deny the material reality of historical 'certainties' such
as the Holocaust, the Falklands, the Gulf War, Serbia, and Rwanda has a
perfection rarely matched outside the academy. How can he fail to see
that 'representation' of these appalling events-inseparable from their
occurrence-carries a powerful political and moral charge so potent that
it is irresponsible to ignore it?  In the circumstances, their
'textuality' takes on such vital importance that the very names we use
to refer to them turn out to be crucially significant. For instance, the
term 'the Holocaust'  has come, over the years, to embody an enormous
and heroic effort somehow historically to speak to, even to begin to
assess and gain some necessary purchase on, an otherwise overwhelming
modern horror. On the other hand, the words 'the Falklands' deal
thoughtlessly and glibly in the shabby terminology of empire. Similar
issues obviously fester away inside the other names so casually strung
together, such as 'The Gulf War, 'Serbia' and 'Rwanda'. Of course these
dreadful events happened. But how we represent them-latent in what we
call them-certainly reflects and often determines what we think and do
about them. I cannot see that postmodernism hinders analysis of this
kind one jot. In my view, it promotes and fosters it. It isn't that
human beings are 'incapable of communicating with each other', Robin.
Quite the reverse. They often communicate with each other all too well.

T. Hawkes
Jensen Probationary Fellow

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 Jan 1998 09:37:19 -0500
Subject:        RSC in NYC

Just in case you missed it, BAM (the Brooklyn Academy of Music) now has
complete listings for the RSC performances in New York in May.  The url
is:

http://www.bam.org

To find the listings, click on "What's Now", then on "Theatre".

Incidentally, for those of you who asked about the NY Shakespeare
Society I mentioned previously, they have just completed their press
packs, mission statement and compiling a comprehensive list of their
academic and artistic advisors.  I should have a copy soon, and I'll
post an official announcement when I do.

Yours,
Tanya Gough

Re: Modern Adaptations

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0071  Friday, 23 January 1998.

[1]     From:   Peter Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 22 Jan 1998 14:17:02 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0069  Re: Modern Adaptations

[2]     From:   Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 22 Jan 1998 11:24:00 -0500
        Subj:   Re: adaptations

[3]     From:   Chris Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 22 Jan 98 20:43:31 -0600
        Subj:   SHK 9.0069  Re: Modern Adaptations


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 22 Jan 1998 14:17:02 GMT
Subject: 9.0069  Re: Modern Adaptations
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0069  Re: Modern Adaptations

John Drakakis asks 'What about Tromio and Juliet?'

I don't know if he means 'is it available?' but it is easily available
here in the UK. My local video store had sold out - so it's obviously
popular. I particularly cherish the moment when Juliet's father is
beaten over the head with a copy of the Yale Shakespeare.  And, by the
way, to be pedantic, it's 'Tromeo and Juliet'.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 22 Jan 1998 11:24:00 -0500
Subject:        Re: adaptations

John Drakakis mentions that Joe Macbeth is "difficult" to get.  Does
that mean it is actually available somewhere?  I'd love to get my hands
on it for the store.  I'm trying a few new sources for Jubal (I've
received several helpful e-mails pointing the way).  Tromeo and Juliet
is also available - still high priced up here in Canada, but cheaper on
DVD.

Yours,
Tanya

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 22 Jan 98 20:43:31 -0600
Subject: Re: Modern Adaptations
Comment:        SHK 9.0069  Re: Modern Adaptations

Dear friends,

I am currently updating the "Shakespeare as Character" and "Spinoff"
bibliographies for SHAKSPER and have incorporated most of the recent
posts about various adaptations. Several people have mentioned an opera
of _Hamlet_, but I lack a few details, such as the author's full name
(the last name is Thomas, I believe) and the date of composition. Your
assistance would be appreciated. You can e-mail me directly at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Thanks for your help. The revised versions should
be available fairly soon.

Chris Gordon

[Editor's Note: I want to offer my grateful thanks to Chris Gordon for
volunteering to update the Spinoff (SPINOFF  BIBLIO) and Character
(CHARACTR BIBLIO) Bibliographies, both areas of continued interest since
SHAKSPER began. -Hardy]

Re: Modern Adaptations

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0069  Thursday, 22 January 1998.

From:           John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 21 Jan 1998 12:07:44 -0000
Subject: 9.0064  Re: Modern Adaptations
Comment:        RE: SHK 9.0064  Re: Modern Adaptations

Joe Macbeth is difficult to get, but Men of Respect (which is in art
based on the 1955 film) is available.  Also in the UK yo can pick up a
VHS print of Jubal (as I did recently) very cheaply indeed.

What about Tromio and Juliet?

Best wishes

John Drakakis

Re: Meaning (Was Postmodernism)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0070  Thursday, 22 January 1998.

[1]     From:   Ralph Gainey <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 21 Jan 1998 09:14:59 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Types of Language

[2]     From:   Norm Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 21 Jan 98 22:29:24 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0067  Re: Postmodernism


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ralph Gainey <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 21 Jan 1998 09:14:59 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Types of Language

Bill Godshalk wrote:

            " Let's face it: we don't know exactly how
             meaning is passed, via language, from
            brain to brain, but, day to day, we rely on
            this phenomenon. If we couldn't do it, pass
            meaning by language, this list would not,
            could not, exist."

I don't think it is so much a matter of not knowing how "meaning" is
communicated, as it is our general failure to appreciate the fundamental
manner in which all language is constructed and utilized, as a matter of
mutual agreement. As a species, H. sapiens has THREE FUNDAMENTAL TYPES
OF LANGUAGE, and each of them is built on a common schemata of ELEMENT,
OPERATION, CONSEQUENCE. We have, so far, invented these three types so
that they are consistent, one with another, although, because of their
disparate histories, the fundamental schemata has not been rigidly
adhered to, and the result does, indeed, resemble a chaotic pizza.

The situation, however, is not hopeless, and we can both reconstruct the
existing natural language(s), and invent/construct new ones.  In
addition, we need to generalize the Euclidean geometry so that it is
capable of exactly modeling natural systems, and also to provide a
common foundation for number theory, set theory, and logic. It can be
easily shown that any concept is readily expressed in any of the three
languages, and thus they are essentially equivalent in communicative
power. This should alert us whenever we posit what appears to be either
a unique description, or what appears as a paradoxical either/or
situation, such as in the wave/particle dichotomy.

Greetings from Little River

My very best regards,
Ralph Gainey
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norm Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 21 Jan 98 22:29:24 EST
Subject: 9.0067  Re: Postmodernism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0067  Re: Postmodernism

Oh my, oh my.  Your cyber-resident reader-response critic notes that the
discussion of Terence Hawkes postmodern rhetoric has lapsed into the
familiar problems that we get into when we assume that meaning is "in" a
text, to be pulled out by the midwife-critic.  Once we recognize that we
on the receiving end construct meaning by psychological processes well
known to the many psychologists who study the rudimentary acts of
reading by schoolchildren, village idiots, and postmodern critics.
There is little or no mystery in how we communicate.  You create an
aural or written text using the codes and canons of our shared language,
and you think it means what you think it means.  I construe it using the
codes and canons of our shared language, and I think it means what I
think it means.  And surprise, surprise! since we are using the same
codes and canons (although we apply them differently), we often
understand each other.  All this is explained in pre-postmodern language
in a book called _The Brain of Robert Frost_ (Routledge) by yours truly,
Norm Holland

Re: F and Q Productions of _King Lear_

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0068  Wednesday, 21 January 1998.

From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 20 Jan 1998 16:58:26 -0800
Subject: Q: F and Q Productions of _King Lear_ -Reply
Comment:        SHK 9.0063  Q: F and Q Productions of _King Lear_ -Reply


Mary,

I know of three Lears based on a non-conflated text.  Here are the
details as best my leaky memory can record them.

Last year the Oregon Shakespeare festival used the folio, slightly cut
by Barry Kraft.  The acting edition is available through their gift
shop.

Adrian Noble's Lear with Robert Stephens also used the Folio.  This was
at the RSC four(?) years ago.  Peter Holland gives it a good write up in
his hugely enjoyable new book, English Shakespeare, Cambridge University
Press.

Shakespeare/Santa Cruz also did a Lear three(?) years ago.  I can't
remember if it was the folio or quarto used, the folio I think.  It was
one of them.

All the best,
Mike Jensen

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