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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: March ::
Re: The Curse of Mac.
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0181  Monday, 2 March 1998.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <
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        Date:   Sunday, 01 Mar 1998 11:20:12 +0000 (HELP)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0178 Re: The Curse of Mac.

[2]     From:   Heather Barnes <
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        Date:   Sunday, 01 Mar 1998 12:45:16 -0800
        Subj:   Re: The Curse of Mac.


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <
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Date:           Sunday, 01 Mar 1998 11:20:12 +0000 (HELP)
Subject: 9.0178 Re: The Curse of Mac.; MM
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0178 Re: The Curse of Mac.; MM

The curse continues. At Stratford, Ontario, three years ago, the fine
Irish/Canadian actress Joyce Campion fell from the Festival Stage's
treacherous balcony to the stage floor and her near death during a
blackout in the dress rehearsal of the dreaded play. She was playing one
of the witches, but instead spent the season in a hospital. Seanna
McKenna, the Lady Macbeth, came to the Centaur Theatre in Montreal fresh
from her success to play Cleopatra and had to cancel the second
performance because of her loss of voice. Dropping my character of
Lepidus, or perhaps living it, I recommended she take Bismatol, a
bismuth medicine that strangely has to be inserted in the opposite
orifice from the throat, and she regained her speech in time for the
third night.

        Hell is indeed murky.

In a letter I got recently from Ronald Harwood, in whose *Taking Sides*
I am presently appearing as Wilhelm Furtwaengler, he recounts how he
worried as the Dresser to Sir Donald Wolfit about the prodigious amount
of spit the great actor for some reason produced when playing Macbeth.
The role does have a slightly larger preponderance of sibilants than
some other of the tragic figures, coming after plethorae of pretty
powerful plosives. Anyway, I suppose we might add a damp first-few-rows
of public to the effects of the infamous MacCurse.

        Harry Hill

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Heather Barnes <
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Date:           Sunday, 01 Mar 1998 12:45:16 -0800
Subject:        Re: The Curse of Mac.

Yes, I would agree with Joseph on the basis of the "curse of Mac.".  In
the past, as I've listened to my schoolmates going on about the "curse",
I've sat quietly chuckling and shaking my head at their loss of reason.
 

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