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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: March ::
Literary Studies; Beaumont and Fletcher
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0203  Monday, 9 March 1998.

[1]     From:   Lee Gibson <
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        Date:   Sun, 8 Mar 1998 17:46:36 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Literary Studies

[2]     From:   Drew Whitehead <
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 >
        Date:   Monday, 9 Mar 1998 16:09:08 +1000 (GMT+1000)
        Subj:   Beaumont and Fletcher


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lee Gibson <
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Date:           Sun, 8 Mar 1998 17:46:36 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Literary Studies

I forward this from another list.

In the TLS for November 17, 1997, p. 3, the following paragraph appears
near the beginning of a long review by Robert Grant of a book by Raymond
Tallis, entitled "Enemies of Hope."

". . . scientists are accustomed to standards of evidence, deduction and
proof which are not only ferociously exacting, but also collectively and
spontaneously enforced. There is no place in science for something which
nowadays bulks unhealthily large in the humanities, and particularly in
the most intellectually vulnerable, literature, namely das
Fuhrerprinzip.

"A scientist may have a Nobel Prize, a vast academic following, media
celebrity, and the ear of the Prime Minister. Yet all those together
cannot secure the publication, in a reputable journal, of a piece of
work by him (or anyone else) that is not up to scratch. Nor can they
shield him from the well-founded criticism of even his most junior
fellow professionals. Contrast all that with literature, where, outside
certain highly specialist scholarly journals, the very notion of a
'reputable journal,' or indeed of any objectively valid intellectual
exercise, is almost extinct. The decline has been accompanied, indeed
caused, by the rise of various Modern Masters, whose intellectual
credentials it is for some reason thought improper to subject to normal
academic scrutiny.  (Philosophy has done so, and been vilified for its
pains.)"

Lee Gibson
Department of English
Southern Methodist University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Drew Whitehead <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 9 Mar 1998 16:09:08 +1000 (GMT+1000)
Subject:        Beaumont and Fletcher

While I realise that this is not perhaps the correct forum, I am
interested in speaking to anyone who wishes about the plays of Beaumont
and Fletcher.  I am presently beginning the research for a post-graduate
honours dissertation about marriage and patriarchal control in B & F
comedies.  One of the problems I've encountered is the selection of
plays.  The canon is vast and I have had difficulty in determining just
what the plays are about.  To date I have read: The Woman's Prize, Rule
a Wife, The Coxcomb,  The Wild Goose Chase, Wit Without Money, and The
Scornful Lady.  While this may be enough for my purposes, I am concerned
that I might be missing a crucial text due to my ignorance.

My apologies to those not interested, for this not being about
Shakespeare, but literary resources at my university are limited.  To
any who wish to reply personal e-mails will be welcome if you do not
want to clutter up this forum.

Thank you,
Drew Whitehead.
 

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