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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: March ::
Re: AYL and Robin Hood
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0263  Friday, 27 March 1998.

[1]     From:   Sara Vandenberg <
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        Date:   Thursday, 26 Mar 1998 08:47:55 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0262  Q: As You Like It

[2]     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Thursday, 26 Mar 1998 11:54:06 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 9.0262  Q: As You Like It

[3]     From:   Sara Vandenberg <
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        Date:   Thursday, 26 Mar 1998 10:49:49 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0262  Q: As You Like It

[4]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Thursday, 26 Mar 1998 16:31:24 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0262  Q: As You Like It

[5]     From:   Jim Shaw <
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        Date:   Friday, 27 Mar 1998 10:10:37 GMT
        Subj:   SHK 9.0262  Q: As You Like It


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sara Vandenberg <
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Date:           Thursday, 26 Mar 1998 08:47:55 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 9.0262  Q: As You Like It
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0262  Q: As You Like It

You might check Malcolm Nelson, _The Robin Hood Tradition in the English
Renaissance_ (Salzburg, 1973) and Tom Wilson Hayes, _The Birth of
Popular Culture: Ben Jonson, Maid Marian, and Robin Hood_ (Pittsburgh,
1992).  Herford and Simpson long ago discussed the possible identity, or
at least links between Jonson's _The May Lord_ (ca. 1619?) and his play
about Robin Hood, _The Sad Shepherd_ (1629?).  See H&S II.213 ff.

Sara van den Berg

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Thursday, 26 Mar 1998 11:54:06 -0500
Subject: Q: As You Like It
Comment:        SHK 9.0262  Q: As You Like It

Re Robin Hood: There's a lot of information about Robin Hood and the
theatre of the 1590s in Stephen Knight, Robin Hood: a Complete Study of
the English Outlaw, Blackwell 1994, pp.115-34.

T. Hawkes

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sara Vandenberg <
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Date:           Thursday, 26 Mar 1998 10:49:49 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 9.0262  Q: As You Like It
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0262  Q: As You Like It

Here's a supplement to my previous message about Robin Hood.

In addition to Ben Jonson's "The Sad Shepherd," you might check the play
by Anthony Munday, "The Downfall of Robert, Earle of Huntington,
afterwards called Robin Hood" (1601) [with additions by Henry Chettle].

On the importance of the legend for Elizabethan political issues, I
would recommend Peter Stallybrass, "'Drunk with the Cup of Liberty':
Robin Hood, the Carnivalesque, and the Rhetoric of Violence in Early
Modern England," in _The Violence of Representation: Literature and the
History of Violence_, ed Nancy Armstrong and Leonard Tennenhouse
(Routledge, 1989).

See also two essays on Robin Hood and late Elizabethan issues: Michael
Brennan, "Foxes and Wolves in Elizabethan Episcopal Propaganda,"
_Cahiers Elisabethains 29 (1986) 83-86; and Andrew Wawn, "Robin Hood and
the Elizabethans," _Cahiers Elisabethains 22 (1982), 87-91.

You might also want to check William Simeone, "Renaissance Robin Hood
Plays," _Folklore in Action_, ed. Horace Beck (1962).

Sara van den Berg
University of Washington

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Thursday, 26 Mar 1998 16:31:24 -0500
Subject: 9.0262  Q: As You Like It
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0262  Q: As You Like It

There is a Ph.D. thesis on the Robin Hood plays, a thesis I read back in
the early 60s, and about which I remember nilch,  accept that it
exists.  I assume that I found a reference to it (in 1965) in the
standard bibliographies, and I further assume that this thesis might be
helpful in tracking down the history of Robin Hood in the 16th century.
How's that for vague?

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Shaw <
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Date:           Friday, 27 Mar 1998 10:10:37 GMT
Subject: Q: As You Like It
Comment:        SHK 9.0262  Q: As You Like It

In addition to Anthony Munday's play, 'The death of Robert, Earle of
Huntington' (1601), the following anonymous ballad of c.1560 was
reprinted in c.1590;

    A merry jest of Robin Hood, and of his life, vvith a newe play
    for to be plaied in May-games. Very pleasant and full of pastime
                                                (STC 13691, 13692)

And although it cannot be not classed as a 'resurgence of interest'
Robin Hood is also mentioned in the anonymous play 'The rare triumphs of
love and fortune' (1589).

Regards,
Jim Shaw
 

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