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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: March ::
Re: Hamlet's Oath
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0279  Monday, 30 March 1998.

[1]     From:   Sean Kevin Lawrence <
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        Date:   Saturday, 28 Mar 1998 13:23:58 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0273  Re: Hamlet's Oath

[2]     From:   An Sonjae <
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        Date:   Monday, 30 Mar 1998 09:15:39 +0900 (KST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0273  Re: Hamlet's Oath


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Kevin Lawrence <
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Date:           Saturday, 28 Mar 1998 13:23:58 -0800
Subject: 9.0273  Re: Hamlet's Oath
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0273  Re: Hamlet's Oath

> I see Hamlet as following his father's voice, not avoiding it; as for
> his whimsical responses (hic et ubique?) that would seem to be a more
> personal choice on the part of the actor.  I find a sense of dread,
> overlaid by the 'antic disposition' for which this scene is just a
> rehearsal.

Maybe.  But calling a king "yon fellow in the cellarage" or a "worthy
pioner" certainly isn't respectful, at any rate.  Apart from the need to
joke, I think we have to find some reason for Hamlet to be so insulting
when he jokes.

Cheers,
Sean.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           An Sonjae <
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Date:           Monday, 30 Mar 1998 09:15:39 +0900 (KST)
Subject: 9.0273  Re: Hamlet's Oath
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0273  Re: Hamlet's Oath

I really do think that the long notes on this topic in Harold Jenkins'
1982 edition of Hamlet for the Arden edition (pages 457-9) cover
virtually every question raised and deserve close reading (like all the
other long notes of that extraordinary edition). Not that he answers
every question, of course. Personally, I have always found Hamlet's use
of 'boy' and 'catchpenny' most unexpectedly belittling if he really
identifies the ghost with his father (but does he?). Jenkins seems to
agree with Bradley that there are three different oaths taken in three
different locations.

An Sonjae, Sogang University, Seoul.
 

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