1998

Q: Audio Macbeth

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0407  Thursday, 30 April 1998.

From:           Armando Guerra <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Apr 1998 19:55:54 -5000
Subject:        Audio cassette

Hello to all,

I am looking for audio cassettes of Shakespeare's Macbeth. Would any one
suggest any in particular? Thank you.

With best regards,
Armando Guerra
School of Foreign Languages
University of Havana
e-mail:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Shakespeare Yearbook: Call for Submissions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0406  Thursday, 30 April 1998.

From:           James L. Harner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 28 Apr 1998 09:47:15 -0500
Subject:        Shakespeare Yearbook: Call for Submissions

_The Shakespeare Yearbook_, edited from volume 4 (1993) by Holger Klein
(Salzburg), will devote volume 11 (2000) to Shakespeare in the Visual
Arts. This volume will be co-edited by James L. Harner (Texas A&M).

We are inviting studies of up to 25 double-spaced pages (including
notes) and 4-6 black-and-white illustrations on the reception of
Shakespeare by visual artists. We hope to print articles on a wide
spectrum of the field, ranging from book illustration to stage design,
sculpture to painting, photography to popular culture, numismatics to
philately, advertising to cybermedia. (Except for animated shorts, we
are excluding film.)

If you intend to submit an article, please send a brief description as
soon as possible to either of the editors. Completed articles must be
submitted by 1 November 1999.

Holger Klein
Institut fur Anglistik und Amerikanistik
Universitat Salzburg
Akademiestr. 24
A-5020 Salzburg
+43-662-8044-422 (voice)
+43-662-8044-613 (fax)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

James L. Harner
World Shakespeare Bibliography
Department of English
Texas A&M University
College Station, TX 77843-4227
409-845-3400 (voice)
409-862-2292 (fax)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
James L. Harner
Editor, World Shakespeare Bibliography
Department of English
Texas A&M University
College Station, TX 77843-4227

Re: Amazing Anagram

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0404  Thursday, 30 April 1998.

[1]     From:   John V Robinson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Apr 1998 19:06:54 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0398  Amazing Anagram

[2]     From:   Louis Marder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Apr 1998 10:18:20 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0398  Amazing Anagram


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John V Robinson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 28 Apr 1998 19:06:54 EDT
Subject: 9.0398  Amazing Anagram
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0398  Amazing Anagram

>Here's a truly amazing anagram for fans of The Soliloquy:

 >To be or not to be: that is the question, whether tis nobler in the
mind
 >to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune....
 >=
 >In one of the Bard's best-thought-of tragedies, our insistent hero,
 >Hamlet, queries on two fronts about how life turns rotten.

WHAT?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Marder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Apr 1998 10:18:20 -0500
Subject: 9.0398  Amazing Anagram
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0398  Amazing Anagram

Tom Gandy:  I don't get it!  Lou Marder This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

More Answers; Second Maiden's Tragedy

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0405  Thursday, 30 April 1998.

[1]     From:   Melissa D. Aaron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Apr 1998 09:38:08 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0396  Assorted Answers

[2]     From:   Melissa D. Aaron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Apr 1998 09:43:53 -0500
        Subj:   Second Maiden's Tragedy


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa D. Aaron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 28 Apr 1998 09:38:08 -0500
Subject: 9.0396  Assorted Answers
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0396  Assorted Answers

>H.R. Greenberg asks, "if there any extensive audios or videos available
>of Sir John Gielgud in major Shakespearean roles."
>
>I'm not sure about audio performances, but the IMdB lists Gielgud's
>performances as Julius Caesar (1970, with Charlton Heston as Marc
>Antony, Jason Robards as Brutus, and Diana Rigg as Portia) and as
>Cassius in the Mankiewicz version (1953) as readily available on video.
>In addition (and this is in response to your second question as well),
>Gielgud played John of Gaunt opposite Derek Jacobi in Richard II in
>1978. This is also available on video.

He's also Clarence in the Olivier RIII.

>In response to Drew Whitehead: the version of the R[educed]
>S[hakespeare] C[ompany] complete works I saw took a couple of hours, but
>could no doubt have been cut even further.  They did a 15-minute, then a
>5-minute, then a 1-minute *Hamlet*, each funnier than the last, though
>the most memorable moment, in my judgment, occurred when one of the
>actors did "To be or not to be" absolutely straight, in a rather quiet
>and understated way: it was remarkably moving.  I do not know whether
>they have published any version of the script (I think it changes over
>time).

It's *The Compleat Works of Wllm Shkspr (abridged)*  Applause, 1994.
Wouldn't be without it.  And don't forget the *backwards* Hamlet.  The
group was on NPR and did their version of Hamlet in 34 seconds.  And, in
response to another question, the script also includes a version of
*Titus Andronicus* as a cooking show.

Melissa Aaron

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa D. Aaron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 28 Apr 1998 09:43:53 -0500
Subject:        Second Maiden's Tragedy

Thought I should mention it, since no one else has:

NeXt Theater in Evanston Illinois is doing a really nice production of
*The Second Maiden's Tragedy* by that great Jacobean playwright Anon.
Of course, they're mentioning that it *might* be *Cardenio* and
therefore *might* be partially Shakespearean.  It doesn't matter-it's a
talented young cast and they handle the ghost sequences and the
overtones of necrophilia really well.  This is its last weekend, May 1
and 2, so those in the Chicago area should hurry if they want to see
it.  I drove all the way from Madison Wisconsin to see it-three
hours-and thought it was well worth it.

Melissa Aaron

Re: the Onlie Begetter

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0403  Thursday, 30 April 1998.

[1]     From:   Joe Shea <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Apr 1998 07:59:57 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0399 Q: Sonnets

[2]     From:   David Joseph Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Apr 1998 19:26:12 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0399  Q: Sonnets


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joe Shea <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 28 Apr 1998 07:59:57 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 9.0399 Q: Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0399 Q: Sonnets

Maybe, the Onlie Begetter is Shakespeare, and the editor printer was
inscribing it to him as a familiar name-W.H. being the equivalent of
say, JP for JP Jones.  Did anyone have middle names back then?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Joseph Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 28 Apr 1998 19:26:12 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 9.0399  Q: Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0399  Q: Sonnets

An Sonjae wrote:

> Some time before Christmas a question was posted to the list asking
> about the current status of the suggestion (made some years ago in PMLA)
> that the mysterious W.H. of the Sonnets' Dedication is a typo for WS and
> (let me add) that Begetter means author. It was noted that Katherine
> Duncan-Jones in her new edition showed no interest in (or awareness of?)
> the PMLA article's suggestions. Her edition has not yet reached me
> (Korea is another planet sometimes) but I do not recall seeing any
> replies to that December query and wonder if I missed something? Or was
> everyone too busy?

Duncan-Jones does not cite Foster's article or mention him by name, but
she does allude to his article in the following sentences (pp.57-8):

"The financial aspect of patronage, in this period, should never be
overlooked.  After three years in which London's public theatres had
been closed because of plague, Shakespeare must have been looking for
the best possible reward for his precious sonnets.  It is most
improbable that he would have wished the book to be dedicated,
sentimentally, to some obscure actor or sea-cook (the mythical 'Willie
Hughes'), or a penniless kinsman (his infant nephew William Hart, or his
presumed brother-in-law William Hathaway) -- least of all to 'William
Himself' or 'William [S]h[akespeare]'.  None of these could offer him
prestige and protection, or, more crucially, a substantial cash
reward."  [She then goes on to argue that 'W.H.' stands for William
Herbert, the Earl of Pembroke.]

Duncan-Jones makes the perhaps unwarranted assumptions that (1) The
dedication was Shakespeare's doing, despite the initials 'T.T.' at the
end; and (2) Shakespeare would have needed a financial reward, even
though he was very well-off by this time.

G. Blakemore Evans, in his New Cambridge edition of the Sonnets (1996),
cites Foster's article and summarizes his arguments (p.115), but adds,
"But Foster's argument founders on what I feel is a forced
interpretation of God as 'our.ever-living.poet'."

Walter Cohen, in the Norton edition of Shakespere (1997), writes
(p.1920): "The Sonnets' dedication is to 'Mr. W.H.," Pembroke's initials
and the reverse of Southampton's.  But neither is likely to have been
addressed as "Mr.", there may well be chronological problems with the
attributions, and 'W.H.' could be a misprint for 'W.SH.' (William
Shakespeare)."  He does not, however, cite Foster's article.

Dave Kathman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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