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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: April ::
Re: Mac. Curse; Vocabulary; look-glass
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0313  Saturday, 4 April 1998.

[1]     From:   Hugh Howard Davis <
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        Date:   Friday, 3 Apr 1998 10:30:24 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Macbeth Curse

[2]     From:   Thelma English <
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        Date:   Friday, 3 Apr 1998 10:02:45 -0800
        Subj:   Vocabulary on Exams

[3]     From:   David Crosby <
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        Date:   Friday, 3 Apr 1998 06:29:39 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0243  RE: R3's "amorous looking-glass"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hugh Howard Davis <
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Date:           Friday, 3 Apr 1998 10:30:24 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Macbeth Curse

I read in today's paper that Alec Baldwin nearly sliced off another
actor's finger in a duel in his current version of Macbeth.

The curse lives on.

Hugh Davis

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thelma English <
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Date:           Friday, 3 Apr 1998 10:02:45 -0800
Subject:        Vocabulary on Exams

This is in response to Professor Flannagan's post concerning vocabulary.

Professor,

Though I am only teaching at the high school level I always include
sections from each text studied in exams (which include difficult
vocabulary).    I require the students to paraphrase the text section,
place it in context, and define difficult words.  Knowing this will be
on each exam encourages students to read each play carefully and ask
questions when they do not understand.  I see no reason for not
continuing this method of examination at higher levels.

Respectfully,
Thelma English

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Crosby <
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Date:           Friday, 3 Apr 1998 06:29:39 -0600
Subject: 9.0243  RE: R3's "amorous looking-glass"
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0243  RE: R3's "amorous looking-glass"

A belated response about Richard's looking glass:

Shakespeare's Sonnet 22 plays with the extended image of the lover as
looking glass:

     My glass shall not persuade me I am old,
     So long as youth and thou are of one date;
     But when in thee time's furrows I behold,
     Then look I death my days should expiate.

The speaker reads his own age by looking not in a literal mirror but in
the face of the beloved.

John Donne's "The Good-Morrow" displays a similar image. The speaker
declares that he and his beloved become one by being reflected in each
other's eyes: "My face in thine eye, thine in mine appeares."

So it appears (and I suspect it was a common trope of the day) that an
'amorous-looking lass' (or 'lad' for that matter) and an 'amourous
looking-glass' were pretty much one and the same.

David Crosby
 

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