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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: April ::
Re: Paul Scofield
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0318  Tuesday, 7 April 1998.

[1]     From:   Stanley Wells <
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        Date:   Monday, 6 Apr 1998 13:36:02 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0315  Re: Paul Scofield

[2]     From:   Stuart Manger <
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        Date:   Monday, 6 Apr 1998 17:23:07 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 9.0315 Re: Paul Scofield


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stanley Wells <
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Date:           Monday, 6 Apr 1998 13:36:02 +0000
Subject: 9.0315  Re: Paul Scofield
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0315  Re: Paul Scofield

Before anyone offers more speculations, it should be understood that
honours (only a few of which are the prerogative of the Queen) are not
infrequently refused, sometimes on grounds of principle, sometimes pure
modesty. Paul Scofield is not only a great actor, one of the most highly
respected in and out of the profession, but also an exceptionally modest
man of unimpeached integrity.

Stanley Wells

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stuart Manger <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 6 Apr 1998 17:23:07 +0100
Subject: Re: Paul Scofield
Comment:        SHK 9.0315 Re: Paul Scofield

Scofield is undoubtedly one of the finest actors to have strode the
boards here in UK since the war. It would be entirely in character for
him to refuse a knighthood: he is an actor of fierce integrity,
uncertain temper at times, definitely non-establishment, and not-luvvie
at all. He can be difficult to work with, so introverted, intense, and
uncompromising is he. He can blow you away on stage, and is pretty
intimidating to play opposite, but riveting to watch on stage.  The film
Lear that started all this emerges from the famous Brook Lear for the
RSC, a ground-breaking, Beckett-like production with the wonderful
Patrick Magee as Gloucester - as in the film - and that mighty sonorous,
grating, trombone of a voice of Scofield, that encompass a pathetic
whisper, child-like feebleness and intense lyricism all within the same
speech. I was fortunate enough to see it on its original run when I was
a mere 17 or so. Totally, took me out!  Yes, one of the truly greats,
but clubbable, a Branagh, a Jacobi, an Olivier, greedy for fame and
status in the profession? No.
 

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